History The Second World War

Semper Paratus – An Unofficial History of The Brockville Rifles

Semper Paratus

 

 

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SEMPER PARATUS
THE BROCKVILLE RIFLES ROYAL CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS (Allied with The King’s Royal Rifle Corps)
SEMPER PARATUS
AN UNOFFICIAL HISTORY
Editor LT. COL. W. S. WATSON, S.St.J.
Associate Editors MAJ. H. S. WHITE CAPT. W. E. Row
Published by authority of:
LT. COL. R. C. Tıvy, C.D. Commanding Officer The Brockville Rifles
Brockville, Ontario, Canada
1966
Published by The Recorder Printing Company of Brockville Limited
CONTENTS
CONTENTS
Pages
Pages
45 45
* * * *
94
Dedication, Preface and Acknowledgements Messages on Occasion of Centennial-Sr. Officers Centennial Year The Badge of The Regiment Alliance, Motto, Affiliations, Perpetuation Battle Honors, Regimental Marches Traditions In Memoriam Origin of The Regiment War of 1812-1814 Battle of Crysler’s Farm Upper Canada Rebellion Battle of The Windmill First Postmaster General of Canada Brockville Volunteer Rifle Company 1856 Foot Artillery Company 1856 Brockville Infantry Company 1861 Fenian Raids 1864. Troops Organized by Railways, The 41st Battalion, Brockville Rifles 1866 The Boer War The Brockville Armoury Constructed The Regiment Represented at King George V Coronation The Regiment 1910-1912 The Regiment 1912-1914 The Regiment–World War I First Contingent from Regiment in World War I The 156th Leeds and Grenville Battalion Honors and Awards World War I. Between Two Wars 1919-1939 Alliance with K.R.R.C. (Now Royal Greenjackets) Depositing of Colours, 156 Battalion Affiliation of 113 Cadet Corps The Regiment in World War II A Company to The S.D. and G. Highlanders
The Training Centre at Brockville G.O. 139 of 1939 Personnel Leaving for Active Service 1940-41 The Regiment in 1941-1942 The Regiment offers a Company to Royal Rifles The Regiment is Mobilized Enlistments for Active Service 1942-1945 The Reserve Battalion 1943-1945 The First Battalion Brockville Rifles C.A. (A.F.) Honors and Awards World War II Roll of Honor World War II Post World War II Era The 60th L.A.A. Regt. (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A. The 32nd Loc, Bry. (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A. The Brockville Rifles R.C.I.C. Re-Established The Brockville Rifles 1961 The Brockville Rifles 1962 The Brockville Rifles 1963 The Brockville Rifles 1964. The Brockville Rifles 1965 The Officers’ Mess The Sergeants’ Mess The Riflemens’ Canteen The Regimental Museum
100 104 110
|
113
117 123 127 128 132 132
Badge of the 41st Battalion.
HEAD-QUARTERS.
DEDICATION This history is dedicated to the men and women of The Brockville Rifles, and the units it officially, and unofficially, perpetuates.
Their devotion to the Crown, their Country, and their Regiment, ensured that there is a Regiment in Brockville to celebrate a Centennial, and that freedom remains to enjoy such a significant occasion.
Some of them fell in battle in many lands in the navy, army or airforce. Others never fired a shot in battle. All of them served the Regiment.
May all who read this be reminded of their duty to their Queen and Country.
MILITIA ORDER NO.1
Whereas Her Britannic Majesty’s Government with feelings of indignation, condemns the gross insult committed
upon the British flag, “That Flag that braved a Thousand Years
The Battle and the Erecze.” By the recent capture of Mason and Slidell, from a British steamer upon the high Hean, by Commodore Wilkes of the United States Navy:
And Wherean, reparation, and immediate surrender of the said persons have been, or no doubt will be made by the British Government, and fears are entertained that the United States Government will not comply with the said demand, in the event of which war will no doubt ensue:.
These are therefore to request that, in order to prepare for the coming event, the OFFICERS und NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS of the 2nd Battalion of Leeds Militia will meet at the Village of
Brockville, Ontario 1966
PREFACE The purpose of this history, being published at the time of the Centennial of The Regiment, is twofold: first to provide a permanent record of the origin and progress of The Brockville Rifles; secondly, to enable present officers and men to learn of the achievements of those who have preceded them. Thus they will realize that there is a tradition to preserve.
All ranks should also realize that it is within their power to injure, or to enhance the reputation of the Regiment. Therefore it is the duty of those who serve to display gallantry and devotion in the field, and in time of peace to carry out their duties in a soldierly manner being ever mindful that the Regiment is judged by their conduct.
I would like to acknowledge my debt to those who have carefully recorded in numerous books, pamphlets, and papers the military events of their day and earlier days. In many instances I have copied their records verbatim. Serap books of recent years and annual historical reports have been of great help. The files of “The Recorder and Times” were valuable sources of information.
I would also like to record my indebtedness to the present and several former Commanding Officers, and to present and former members of the Regiment, for a great deal of information and advice.
W. S. W.
AY MED 97
Instant, at 12 o’clock, noon, for the purpose of making preliminary arrangements for DRILL and other
Militia duty. Any Officer belonging to the said Battalion who does not feel inclined to Fall In and join freely his brother Officers in said Drill, will please send in his resignation at once in order that another may be appointed in his place ; or any officer who from inability is unable any longer to perform Militin duty cai be relieved by signifying the same to his Commanding officer, Colonel McCREA with his officere of the FIGHTING 5th, hai kindly consented to join with the GALLANT 2nd in this DRILL.
“ENGLAND EXPECTS EVERY MAN TO DO HIS DUTY.”
J. L. SCHOFIELD,
Lieut. Col. Commanding 2nd Bat. Leeds Milicia. Brockville Monitor Print
A Militia Order of 1861 confirms the existence of an organized battalion of Militia in Brockville at that time.

MESSAGES ON THE OCCASION OF THE CENTENNIAL OF THE REGIMENT OCTOBER 5, 1966
H
THE HONORARY COLONEL
As Area Commander it was my privilege to have the Brockville Rifles under my command from 1955 to 1960. Throughout this period I was greatly impressed with its efficiency and it was undoubtedly one of the best units in the area. I am extremely proud of being the Honorary Colonel of such a splendid Regiment and take very great pleasure in adding my tribute to the excellent short history written by Lt. Colonel Watson. May this fine Regiment go forward from strength to strength and continue to uphold the proud traditions of its past.
Brig. T. E. D’O. Snow, O.B.E.,
C.St.J., C.D.
Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D., C.D.
THE HONORARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL
Having joined the Regiment on Re-Organization after World War I it was my privilege to serve as an active officer until 1948. During my term as commanding-officer I was responsible for conversion to the 60th L.A.A. Regiment (The Brockville Rifles) R.C.A.
I was proud, in 1960, to be selected as Honorary Lieutenant Colonel of my own Regiment to which I have been closely associated for fortyseven years.
On its past record, the Regiment has earned the right to enter its second century of service to Queen and Country, not only as a major unit of the Militia, but as one which has gathered greater strength and efficiency with every change of role and Corps which has been imposed upon it.
To all serving members and former members I extend my congratulations and warm wishes on this historic occasion.
THE COMMANDING OFFICER
Those of us now serving realize that it is a signal honor to be active in the Regiment during the Centennial year. This honor carries with it the responsibility of ensuring that the Regiment enters the second century of service with enthusiasm, efficiency and with attention to the traditions that have made the Rifleman famous among soldiers everywhere. Brockville, Ontario 1966
Lt. Col. R. C. Tivy, C.D.

CENTENNIAL YEAR On October the fifth, eighteen hundred and sixty-six, the Regiment officially came into being authorized under the name of the “41st ‘Brockville Battalion of Rifles'”. This battalion was formed from six independent rifle companies authorized 27 September 1855 to 11 December 1862. These companies were as follows: No. 1 Company-Brockville, No. 2 Company-Gananoque, No. 3 Company-Perth, No. 4 Company-Merrickville, No. 5 Company-Carleton Place and No. 6 Company-Pakenham. Major James Crawford was promoted to lieutenant-colonel and given command. Capt. Robert Bowie became the acting adjutant, and Lieutenant W. H. Cole was promoted to captain and took command of No. 1 Company.
Thus in this year 1966 we celebrate the centennial of our Regiment which is recognized by The Department of National Defence as having been authorized in 1866, one year before Confederation.
In this Regiment we trace our history from much earlier beginnings in an area where service to the Crown was a way of life as early as 1796.
KOA
Officers of Provisional Battalion, 1866.
Standing, from left-Ensign Joshua Legge, Ensign Matheson, Ensign Geo. Windeat, Lt.-Col. James Crawford, Ensign Geo. Redmond, Lt. and Adjt. R. Bowie. Lt. A. J. Matheson Seated–Lt. H. S. McDonald, Capt. Henry Starr, Lt. Moffatt, Capt. Spellman, Capt. McCrum,
Capt. J. D. Buell, Capt. W. H. Cole, Surg. Capt. E. B. Sparham.
THE BADGE The black badge of The Brockville Rifles, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps, has its origin in the Maltese Cross of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, with whom the Brockville Rifles is allied. The crown which surmounts the badge is St. Edward’s Crown which became the official heraldic representation of the Crown for the Commonwealth by command of Her Majesty the Queen in 1952. Two of the battle honors won in the first world war, “Amiens” and “Pursuit to Mons” are emblazoned on the badge. The bugle, or horn, as it is sometimes called, came like the Maltese Cross from the 60th Rifles of the K.R.R.C. It is fairly well established that the Maltese Cross was introduced in the British Army by Lt. Col. Baron de Rottenbury who was in command of the Sth Battalion of the 60th Rifles in 1797.
CL4. LA
FENCIE
ALLIANCE Our alliance with the K.R.R.C. dates from 1926. At that time Major F. C. Curry, V.D., submitted a design for the badge to conform with the K.R.R.C. customs. Major Curry’s design was approved by His Majesty King George V.
AGARRY
ESDGE
GUBAS
UGA
THE MOTTO The motto of the Regiment is “Sem per Paratus” (Always Ready)
The Badge of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps.
The Badge of the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders
AFFILIATED UNITS The Cadet Corps of The Brockville Collegiate Institute and Vocational School, and The South Grenville District High School are affiliated with the Regiment,
PERPETUATION A study of the history of The Brockville Rifles suggests that it perpetuates many units but officially its perpetuates the 15 6th Battalion, and 32nd Battery, C.F.A., Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919.
BATTLE HONORS The First World War 1914-1919: “Amiens”, “Arras, 1918”, “Hinden
burg Line”, “Pursuit to Mons”. The first and the last are approved
for emblazonment. The Second World War 1939-1945: “Honorary Distinction, Second
World War, The Badge of the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders with the year dates 1944-45 to be emblazoned.”
AMIENS TO MONS Acting as the spear-head of the allied thrust on the western front commencing on August 8th and concluding at Mons on November 11th, 1918 the Canadian Corps effected captures which totalled over 32,000 prisoners, 750 field and heavy guns, and 3,500 machine guns. The advance attained a depth of 95 miles, representing 100 towns and villages, and 450 square miles of territory. More than 300,000 French and Belgian civilians were liberated from German domination.
In this period the Canadian Corps sustained 46,100 casualties but encountered and defeated decisively approximately 50 German divisions, or nearly one quarter of the total German forces on the western front.
These notable victories of the final three months of fighting will ever rank among the proudest achievements of British arms.
Brockville Collegiate Institute and Vocational School receive Colors from the Brockville Rifles 2nd (R) Bn. May 10th, 1946.

IN MEMORIAM No record exists of the names of all the men who served in this Regiment, and who subsequently met death on active service. We have taken this list of men who served with 1st Battalion Brockville Rifles in World War II. Death came to these men in many lands – Canada, the Aleutians, Sicily, Italy, France, Germany, Belgium, Holland, Jamaica. Let them represent our dead! Capt. L. M. Yates
Rfn. G. G. Brooks Lt. R. J. Demille
Rfn. D. Henderson Lt. J. M. Carroll
Rfn. G. N. Holdright Lt. C. F. Heald
Rfn. E. J. Hunter Lt. V. J. O’Brien
Rfn. F. J. Johnston Lt. S. Vessey
Rfn. C. Low C.Q.M.S. G. W. Hone
Rfn. J. B. Legary Sgt. E. W. Baker, M. M.
Rfn. Wm. Rhamey Sgt. W. G. McKee
Rfn. O. J. Sabourin Sgt. J. M. Storey
Rfn. C. N. Throop Rfn. A. R. Bensley
Rfn. J. A. Zip Rfn. W. G. Buell
TRADITIONS The Regiment to-day preserves the traditional distinctive characteristics in dress, drill and training of rifle units.
The first rifle units were organized in America as the 62nd Regiment in 1755 “The Loyal American Provinciale”. They later became the famous 60th and fought valiantly at Quebec, Louisbourg, and Kingston, and in all Colonial encounters. Specially trained as sharpshooters and skirmishers for action against the French and Indians, their value
was soon recognized and they became one of the most celebrated units in the British Army during the Peninsular War, and the Indian Mutiny. The black buttons on rifles uniforms date from 1808 when, after the historic rearguard action at Corunna in the Peninsular War, the men blackened their buttons in mourning for their beloved leader, Sir John Moore. The sombre but smart rifle green uniform was adopted as protective camouflage during skirmishing. It is the colour of the “dress” uniform to-day in the age of battledress. The fast marching pace of the Rifles – the famous “140” — first attracted attention in the great
march of the Rifles to Talavera. On that occasion “in their haste to reach the battle, in heavy marching order under a burning sun, and with insufficient food, they marched fifty miles in twenty-five hours with only two short halts”. Drill is often done at the double. Short words of command and quick silent drill are in keeping with employing principles on the parade square which are best suited for the battlefield.
The early role of the Rifles prevented them from carrying colors into battle. This rule still stands. Rifle Regiments never carry colors. Battle honors are shown on the cap badge and drums.
As far as can be determined, battalions of the 60th received the first rifles issued to the British Army. This probably accounts for the title “Rifle Regiment”. Bayonets were not provided with the first rifles so the men carried swords. As a result bayonets are called swords in Rifle Regiments to this day. Even though the officers may be parading with swords drawn on a ceremonial parade, swords (bayonets) are never fixed.
Pioneers were originally employed in advance of the Regiment to clear brush and permit movement. This accounts for the tradition of the pioneers marching at the head of the Regiment, and for the special brush clearing equipment they carry.
The Brockville Rifles are proud of these traditions which set them apart from the infantry. They are trained to-day with the most modern
weapons available in the Militia, and as their motto suggests they are as prepared for battle to-day as they have always been in the past.
REGIMENTAL MARCHES March Past-Bonnie Dundee Slow Marches—Green Sleeves and the Slow March of the Royal Regiment
of Canadian Artillery.
“Of all these men not one showed weakness or sought to avoid peril. When they could not clearly see their way, they were full of hope; in action, and when the danger was now manifest, they trusted in their own stout hearts. Thus doing, they avoided all reproach and, with their bodies encountering valiantly the danger, were transformed in the twinkling of an eye from the scene of their glory, not their fear.”
— Pericles’ speech on the Athenians dead
in battle, from Thycydidas
GENESIS Although we are not permitted to claim officially that we are more than one hundred years old, a history of the Regiment which did not record the military events in this area which are known to have taken place as early as 1796 would not be acceptable. Military service seems to have appealed to men in this area for over one hundred and seventy years.
Following the capitulation of the French at Montreal in 1760 the whole of North America came under British rule. Little attention seems to have been paid to the possibility that subsequent to that date Canada would have to be defended from aggression. The early laws of the land did provide for a loosely organized form of Militia, based on the old French system, whereby every able-bodied man between sixteen and fifty was liable for service.

IN MEMORIAM No record exists of the names of all the men who served in this Regiment, and who subsequently met death on active service. We have taken this list of men who served with 1st Battalion Brockville Rifles in World War II. Death came to these men in many lands – Canada, the Aleutians, Sicily, Italy, France, Germany, Belgium, Holland, Jamaica. Let them represent our dead! Capt. L. M. Yates
Rfn. G. G. Brooks Lt. R. J. Demille
Rfn. D. Henderson Lt. J. M. Carroll
Rfn. G. N. Holdright Lt. C. F. Heald
Rfn. E. J. Hunter Lt. V. J. O’Brien
Rfn. F. J. Johnston Lt. S. Vessey
Rfn. C. Low C.Q.M.S. G. W. Hone
Rfn. J. B. Legary Sgt. E. W. Baker, M. M.
Rfn. Wm. Rhamey Sgt. W. G. McKee
Rfn. O. J. Sabourin Sgt. J. M. Storey
Rfn. C. N. Throop Rfn. A. R. Bensley
Rfn. J. A. Zip Rfn. W. G. Buell
TRADITIONS The Regiment to-day preserves the traditional distinctive characteristics in dress, drill and training of rifle units.
The first rifle units were organized in America as the 62nd Regiment in 1755 “The Loyal American Provinciale”. They later became the famous 60th and fought valiantly at Quebec, Louisbourg, and Kingston, and in all Colonial encounters. Specially trained as sharpshooters and skirmishers for action against the French and Indians, their value
was soon recognized and they became one of the most celebrated units in the British Army during the Peninsular War, and the Indian Mutiny. The black buttons on rifles uniforms date from 1808 when, after the historic rearguard action at Corunna in the Peninsular War, the men blackened their buttons in mourning for their beloved leader, Sir John Moore. The sombre but smart rifle green uniform was adopted as protective camouflage during skirmishing. It is the colour of the “dress” uniform to-day in the age of battledress. The fast marching pace of the Rifles – the famous “140” — first attracted attention in the great
march of the Rifles to Talavera. On that occasion “in their haste to reach the battle, in heavy marching order under a burning sun, and with insufficient food, they marched fifty miles in twenty-five hours with only two short halts”. Drill is often done at the double. Short words of command and quick silent drill are in keeping with employing principles on the parade square which are best suited for the battlefield.
The early role of the Rifles prevented them from carrying colors into battle. This rule still stands. Rifle Regiments never carry colors. Battle honors are shown on the cap badge and drums.
As far as can be determined, battalions of the 60th received the first rifles issued to the British Army. This probably accounts for the title “Rifle Regiment”. Bayonets were not provided with the first rifles so the men carried swords. As a result bayonets are called swords in Rifle Regiments to this day. Even though the officers may be parading with swords drawn on a ceremonial parade, swords (bayonets) are never fixed.
Pioneers were originally employed in advance of the Regiment to clear brush and permit movement. This accounts for the tradition of the pioneers marching at the head of the Regiment, and for the special brush clearing equipment they carry.
The Brockville Rifles are proud of these traditions which set them apart from the infantry. They are trained to-day with the most modern
weapons available in the Militia, and as their motto suggests they are as prepared for battle to-day as they have always been in the past.
REGIMENTAL MARCHES March Past-Bonnie Dundee Slow Marches—Green Sleeves and the Slow March of the Royal Regiment
of Canadian Artillery.
“Of all these men not one showed weakness or sought to avoid peril. When they could not clearly see their way, they were full of hope; in action, and when the danger was now manifest, they trusted in their own stout hearts. Thus doing, they avoided all reproach and, with their bodies encountering valiantly the danger, were transformed in the twinkling of an eye from the scene of their glory, not their fear.”
— Pericles’ speech on the Athenians dead
in battle, from Thycydidas
GENESIS Although we are not permitted to claim officially that we are more than one hundred years old, a history of the Regiment which did not record the military events in this area which are known to have taken place as early as 1796 would not be acceptable. Military service seems to have appealed to men in this area for over one hundred and seventy years.
Following the capitulation of the French at Montreal in 1760 the whole of North America came under British rule. Little attention seems to have been paid to the possibility that subsequent to that date Canada would have to be defended from aggression. The early laws of the land did provide for a loosely organized form of Militia, based on the old French system, whereby every able-bodied man between sixteen and fifty was liable for service.

the southern or American channel, (they were taking no chances on an ambush in the Lost Channel), the scout vessels hastened back to Kingston
with the news. Lt. Col. Morrison of the 89th Regiment gathered what forces he could spare from that important post and started in pursuit. It was one of the most remarkable races in history.
Travelling down the southern channel were the 300 bateaux and 8,000 men of Wilkinson’s Army. Racing to meet them down the northern one were Morrison’s men, a bare 600, both regulars and militiamen. Wilkinson had a head start, but when nearing the place where the river narrows his flotilla was sighted by a Lieutenant Elliott who had been posted for this purpose on the headland at Fulford Point. He galloped to Brockville and on to Prescott spreading the alarm; but Wilkinson was able to ontinue unmolested down river. Near Ogdensburg he landed his troops, and marched them past that town by night to avoid the guns of Fort
Wellington, then he sought to land on the Canadian shore but was driven off by Jacob Brouse and some volunteers near Hoople’s Creek. He continued down stream, but being constantly harassed by the Militia, landed near Chrysler’s Farm “to beat off this petty interference”, before attempting to run the Long Sault Rapids.
He had a strong position on a little rise of ground, and two guns posted near the river. A small gully behind him was a disadvantage, but he had no intention then of retreating. The positions of the various troops is well shown in an excellent panorama of the battle exhibited at the Chrysler Memorial Park. It is unnecessary to give further details of the battle here. He not only failed to drive off the British but lost 102 killed, 237 wounded and 100 prisoners of war, a total of 439 of the 1600 men he landed for the battle. He withdrew hurriedly toward Cornwall and recrossed the river, and the Great Invasion of Canada was over; for the force coming up the Lake Champlain Route to attack Montreal had been just as definitely defeated.
In the period following the war command of the 1st Battalion Leeds Militia passed to Colonel Levius D. Sherwood who trained his unit in this quiet provincial town from 1822 to 1830. He was succeeded by Colonel Adiel Sherwood who retired in 1846.
On 28 August 1913 a company of the Regiment under Capt. H. H. Edwards took part in the Centenary Celebration of the Battle of Crysler’s Farm near Morrisburg. This is a sketch of the memorial as it appeared at that time.
UPPER CANADA REBELLION The Upper Canada Rebellion of 1837 aroused the military spirit of the citizens of Brockville. The town was said to be in arms” a state which one gathers was enjoyed by all concerned.
William Lyon MacKenzie’s abortive rebellion in Upper Canada was of short duration. He escaped to The United States when even the failure of his attempt to set up a Republic at Navy Island did not discourage him. He travelled through Northern New York where memories of the War of 1812 made it easier to find people who were attracted by the possibility of striking a blow at England.
w
Sketch of position at Battle of the Windmill.
12

The Battle of The Windmill One of the sharpest encounters of the rebellions took place about thirteen miles east of Brockville near Prescott. On 12 November, 1838 a large number of armed men from Syracuse, Watertown, French Creek, Oswego and Ogdensburg gathered under a Polish officer Nils von Schoultz. They embarked at Sackett’s Harbour and Oswego for an invasion of Canada. They possessed two vessels one of which was commanded by “Commodore” Bill Johnston. Descending the St. Lawrence, Johnston succeeded in running his schooner aground near Ogdensburg. The other schooner drifted past Prescott, finally anchoring near the town. One historian reports that these schooners were towed by a tug whose captain cut them adrift near Morristown when he learned of the purpose of their expedition. Von Schoultz landed below Prescott and took possession of a stone windmill and several stone houses in the neighbourhood. It had been the intention to strike at Fort Wellington but they were sighted by a sentry of Colonel Plomer Young, in command at Prescott. When the schooner failed to answer the challenge to the satisfaction of the Colonel he fired his sentry’s rifle at her. The element of surprise being lost von Schoultz drifted past the fort to Windmill Point.
The windmill and surrounding buildings formed a natural defensive position. A small vessel, the Experiment, commanded by Lieutenant Power, rushed from Brockville to help but she carried only two small guns and was able to do little to prevent the reinforcement of the bridgehead at the windmill by another vessel obtained by the invaders. Colonel
North the commanding officer at Ogdensburg was made aware of the actions of the rebels but for reasons best known to himself did nothing to stop the rebel invasion. Captain Sandom, who, along with 200 seamen from the British warships at Quebec had been sent to re-open the Kingston naval base, promptly despatched two armed steamers and a force of 70 marines and regulars to Prescott. They arrived the next day.
Meanwhile the Queen’s Own Volunteers, also known as the Brockville Invincibles, a militia unit, organized and commanded by Lt. Col. O. R. Gowan, who had formed the Grand Orange Lodge of British North America in 1830, marched from Brockville in the pouring rain and took up positions around Fort Wellington. At the same time militia from Glengarry, Dundas and Grenville arrived at the scene of battle. Although they were in unfavourable positions for attack and very much exposed, these militia forces succeeded in driving the invaders from their forward positions behind stone fences and outbuildings into the adjacent stone buildings, one of which was like a Martello tower about 100 feet in circumference, 80 feet in height and with walls three and one half feet thick. The cannon balls fired from the armed steamers failed to pierce the walls and it became obvious that heavier artillery would be required. Two days passed with little activity except the exchange of shots between the militia and defenders, but with the arrival of four companies of the 83rd Regiment, and a detachment of Royal Artillery with several guns, the attack re-opened. Under the fire of the guns the buildings near the
windmill were soon on fire. The defenders hung on bravely although with the river now commanded by British vessels they knew they would receive no further help from the United States. Von Schoultz and several others made an effort to escape in the darkness but were captured. The remaining defenders agreed to a demand for unconditional surrender. The fighting had lasted four days with the surrender on November 16th. The British troops and militia suffered 80 casualties. About 50 invaders were killed and 160 prisoners were taken. In the pocket of one of the invaders was found a list of the proscribed persons in Prescott who were to be put to death.
Some of the invaders were very young and were returned to the United States. Von Schoultz and many of his followers were roped together in pairs and marched through Prescott and embarked on the steamer “Brockville” and sent to Kingston. On arrival in Kingston, tied together in pairs with a rope running between them they were marched to Fort Henry with von Schoultz in the lead while a band played Yankee Doodle. In spite of advice to the contrary by the young lawyer John A.
Macdonald, who defended him, von Schoultz and his men pleaded guilty and were sentenced to die by hanging. Before his execution on the glacis of Fort Henry he made his will, drawn up with the help of the future Prime Minister of Canada. He left £400 to the dependents of the militia who had been killed at the windmill and £100 to the newly founded College of Regiopolis at Kingston. He acknowledged the kind treatment received at the hands of the officers and men of the 83rd Regiment and the sheriff of Kingston.
It must have been a source of satisfaction to the Brockville men who participated in this battle to know that they assisted in the defeat of a brave and determined enemy. The performance of the militia in this battle did much to stimulate interest in the militia and on 30 December, 1837 a Militia General Order authorized the embodiment of 700 militia volunteers for four months. Owing to continued tension and raids the last of the units thus raised were not disbanded until 1850.
POSTMASTER GENERAL COMMANDS The Leeds Militia continued to train in spite of the lack of opportunity for action. Their commanding officer from 1846 to 1856 was Lt. Col. (The Hon.) James Morris, who afterwards became Canada’s first Postmaster General.
THE BROCKVILLE VOLUNTEER RIFLE COMPANY
The Regiment’s name became even closer to its present form when in April 1856 the unit ceased to be known as The 1st Battalion Leeds
Militia and was officially gazetted as The Brockville Volunteer Rifle Company. The commanding officer at the time of the change was Lt. Col. (The Hon.) George Sherwood, a member of that famous family so

11
prominent in The Family Compact. Appointments included T. D. Smyth, M.D., captain, Allan Turner, lieutenant, Andrew Thompson, ensign, R. A. Kelly, adjutant, Henry A. Jones, Solomon Sheppard and John Roebuck, sergeants, Zacchary Lewis, Robert Lipsett and B. Colborne, corporals. The company drilled in an improvised armoury on Court House Avenue, just below the old post office. In December 1856 a Militia General Order authorized the formation of a Foot Artillery Company in Brockville to be attached to the Volunteer Rifle Company. Lt. W. H. Jackson, afterwards lieutenant-colonel and D.O.C., M.D. No. 1, commanded the gun detachment. In 1860 The Brockville Volunteer Rifle Company acted as a guard of honour to H.R.H. The Prince of Wales (King Edward VII) on the occasion of his visit to Brockville.
At this time a wooden blockhouse armed with two guns stood in the park, now called Block House Island, to protect the harbour.
After a few weeks relief from duty they were sent to Cornwall in July to guard the canal, where they remained until relieved in November. At Cornwall the company was part of a Provisional Battalion commanded by the now Major James Crawford, with Capt. R. Bowie acting as adjutant. The Infantry Company remained on duty here.
It is recorded that the armoury about this time was located in the Metropolitan Block on King Street. When the Rifle Company returned there was still considerable anxiety about the possibility of a raid by the Fenians. The one police constable, Thomas Mowat, was not considered an adequate guard for Brockville. Therefore the armoury was fitted out for sleeping and the Company ordered out for night service as home defence. Sixty members slept at the armoury and forty at their homes. Each of the three banks was provided with a sentry, another was placed at the opera house, another at the Electric Light dock (foot of Thomas Street), another where Victoria Building now stands, and two at the C.P.R. wharf. The pay was described as a windfall amounting to two
BROCKVILLE INFANTRY COMPANY During the year 1861 when hostilities between the north and south across the border threatened to extend to Canada another unit was formed in Brockville, by Capt. Jacob D. Buell. It was known as the Brockville Infantry Company. With three units in Brockville the citizens had reason to feel secure. A provincial portfolio of defence was created with John A. Macdonald of Kingston as Minister of Militia Affairs.
BEST COMPANIES In 1863 the Government offered four prizes for the best drilled companies between Belleville and Quebec. Col. Earl of the Grenadier Guards conducted the competition awarding first prize to the Brockville Rifle Company, and second prize to the Brockville Infantry Company. Even in those days the Rifles kept a step ahead of the Infantry.
THE FENIAN RAIDS The success of the northern armies in the American Civil War caused great concern in Canada about the possibility of invasion by what was the strongest army in the world at that time. Canadians were relieved to see this army demobilized but they had another cause for alarm. A group of Irish Americans known as The Fenian Brotherhood was gathering recruits from the ranks of the discharged American soldiers.
The scare caused by the possibility of a Fenian Raid near home gave the local volunteers the hope of active service. In 1864 the Brock ville Rifles Company under command of Capt. James Crawford was sent to Amherstburg for defence duties lasting several months. They returned to Brockville in the spring of 1865. While at Amherstburg they formed part of The Western Battalion under command of Lt. Col. w. Osborne Smith, late of H.M.’s 39th Regiment.
Non Commissioned officers in the early sixties left to right F. W. Conway, R.S.M., Geo. A. Dina, Robt. G. Bowie, Mike J. Reid, Henry A. Starr, W m. C. Smart, Geo. Redmond.

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dollars a week. The officers gave their service gratis. On Wednesday 7 March 1866 a story spread that the town was to be attacked. The local telegraph operator, Mr. Murray, was on duty all night to receive orders regarding the disposal of volunteer rifle companies. The Rifle Company was standing by, and Capt. Buell was ordered to call out his Infantry Company. In Brockville all was enthusiasm and every man was eager for the fray. A considerable force was concentrated in Brockville which took on the appearance of an armed camp. Crawford, Bowie and Sergeant-Major Conway, a British Regular attached as an instructor, formed the headquarters for five companies, being a total of 330 rank and file. Brockville Rifles, 100 strongCapt. W. H. Cole, commanding, Ensign George Windeat Perth Rifles, 55 strong-Capt. Scott Gananoque Rifles, 55 strong–Capt. M. McCrumm, Lt. H. S. McDonald Brock ville Infantry, 65 strong-Capt. J. D. Buell, Lt. Henry Starr, Ensign George Redmond Carleton Place Rifles, 55 strong–Capt. Poole
The volunteers were billeted at the different hotels and boarding houses. The companies drilled every day, and Capt. Buell’s fife and drum corps added to the military atmosphere. Once a week the companies were exercised in battalion drill on Court House Square. One night a scow was noticed passing close to shore. As was the custom it was challenged by a sentry who received no response from the crew. The sentry was ordered to fire by Capt, Poole, the officer in command of the guard. The sentry hesitated and Capt. Poole took his rifle and fired at the scow’s lantern. The shot smashed the lantern and cut the halter securing a horse. The horse reared up and fell into the hold breaking a leg. The scow then came to shore and proved to be a smuggler, which is said to account for failure to answer the challenge. In the finest traditions of the service, and as expected of an officer and gentleman, Capt. Poole paid for the horse.
One of Canada’s greatest soldiers, Maj. J. M. Walsh of Brockville, whose courage and tact in the capture of the famous Indian chief, Sitting Bull, an important part of Canada’s history, served as a lieutenant in a Prescott company which helped to guard the frontier at this time.
It must have been a disappointment to the keen volunteers when no raid developed. The Fenians were fortunate to have been spared the defeat which they would have met at Brockville.
In his report at the end of the year, Colonel Lindsay, of the Imperial Army stated, “The Battalion in Brockville under Lt. Col. Crawford is the best in Canada.”
RAILWAY TROOPS The Militia were not alone in guarding property at this time. The Grand Trunk Railway Company and The Brockville and Ottawa Railway Company each had a company of troops to protect their property if necessary. Captains McKechnie and Young commanded the Grand Trunk Company, and Capt. Worsley commanded the Brockville and Ottawa Company.
THE 41st BATTALION, BROCKVILLE RIFLES
On 5 October, 1866 the 41st Battalion, Brockville Rifles was organized, and Major James Crawford was promoted to lieutenant-colonel to become the commanding officer. The new battalion had six companies each with 65 men, which were located as follows:
No. 1 Coy. — Brockville No. 2 Coy. — Gananoque No. 3 Coy. – Perth No. 4 Coy. — Merrickville No. 5 Coy. — Carleton Place
No. 6 Coy. — Pakenham (At the same time the 42nd Battalion (Infantry) was formed with one of its six companies at Brockville. Capt. Jacob D. Buell, father of Lt. Col. W. S. Buell, was given command, and promoted to lieutenantcolonel. He was succeeded in command of the Infantry Company in Brockville by Lt. Henry Starr.)
Lt. W. H. Cole was given command of No. 1 Company in Brockville. Some other well-known names of that era were Ensign A. J. Matheson (Hon. A. J. Matheson, Provincial Treasurer), Lt. H. S. McDonald (His Honour Judge McDonald), and Capt. Robert Bowie.
In 1870 there was another Fenian scare and the battalion was again called out to guard the canal at Cornwall. Upon their return in two weeks when the scare ended they were met by the fife and drum band of Col. Buell’s 42nd Battalion (later to become the Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Regiment). In 1871 Lt. Col. Wilmot H. Cole, who had served since 1862, was made commanding officer and held the appointment for twenty-seven years. He died in Brockville at a venerable old age during World War I and was buried at Brockville with full military honours by The 59th Battalion C.E.F. which was stationed in the city at that time. In 1870 the battalion supplied a small detachment of one officer and seven
men for service in the Red River Expedition. Later when the Red River Rebellion occurred, the whole battalion volunteered for service to subdue the uprising, but it was decided that no troops should be moved from the frontier.
In 1871 the Ontario Rifle Association sent its first team to compete at the world famous rifle matches at Wimbledon for what is known now as the Bisley Prize. Hugh Wilkinson and Major W. R. Buell were Brockville men who were on the team. Wilkinson stood sixth and Buell was close behind.
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On 1 January, 1898 The Rifles became a “City Corps” and lost the companies in the outlying centres. In the ensuing reorganization they acquired the band of the 42nd Infantry, and it is generally accepted that this is when “Bonnie Dundee” became the regimental march. On 28 June, 1898 Lt. Col. T. W. Sparham took command of the battalion with four companies in Brockville. The armoury at this time was in the skating rink at the south-east corner of James and Garden Streets, the site of the present curling rink.
OUR PRESENT HOME In 1900 the contract for the present armoury on the Worthington property, King Street East, was let to D. S. Booth and Albert Haggerty. it was completed in 1902 and the Regiment now enlarged to six companies (one of which was located at Lyn under Capt. W. S. Buell) moved into its present home.
The Armoury
41STBATT
BAND BROCKVILLE
First Band of the 41st Battalion, 1897.
THE BOER WAR With the outbreak of the Boer War in 1899 the battalion supplied one officer and twenty-one other ranks for service in that theatre. With the first contingent were privates Robert Hogan, C. A. Donaldson, Richard Turner, Harold Fraser, Harry Fisher and Fred Coons. These men participated in the Battle of Paardeberg. Pte. Allan Coburn was with Capt. Bruce Carruthers through the severe engagement at Hart’s River. Horace J. Robinson and Torrance Glazier, (whose medals were given to the Regiment), served with the Imperial Troops. Robinson who paid his own passage to Durban to enlist, was mentioned for conspicuous bravery on several occasions. Dr. F. B. Carron and W. G. Connolly of Caintown were also with the Canadian contingent. With the second contingent of artillery were privates Thomas Price, Robert Bellamy, Dr. E. L. Kenny, George Robinson, Lawrence Watson, Fred McIntosh, James Harper, Alex Sargent and Bert Andress. Dr. Anson Donaldson served with the Strathcona Horse
41st BATTALION, OFFICERS
3rd February, 1901 Front Row – Captain R. N. Horton, Lieut. W. C. MacLaren, Captain D. Strachan, B.A., Captain E. W. Jones,
Lieut-Col. T. W. Sparham, Lieut. W. S. Buell, Lieut-Col. V, H. Moore, Captain W. J. Wright. Back Row – Lieut. R. W. Stewart, Lieut. H. R. Sidley, Captain A. M. Patterson, Captain J. M. Power,
Lieut. E. H. Bissett, Captain A. A. Fisher, Lieut. R. A. McLelland

Col. Sparham was succeeded on 7 March, 1904 by Lt. Col. A. A. Fisher, who as Major Fisher had commanded No. 4 Company. The establishment was reduced to four companies. The battalion is reported to have taken on new life as a flourishing city battalion. The companies were required to complete twelve days drill by night work extending over a period of three months. To complete their training they visited the rifle ranges at Rockcliffe in 1904 and 1905. Col. Fisher later became a judge in Renfrew district.
In 1906 the Rifles paid a friendly visit to the 8th Royal Rifles in Quebec City for two days, an outing that was enjoyed by all ranks. The two regiments were inspected on the Garrison Parade Ground by Lt. Col. Roy, D.O.C., M.D. No. 8, on Dominion Day.
In 1907 the Regiment went to Niagara Falls for the unveiling of a tablet to Lt. Col. McDonnell at Queenston Heights on the site of his death while acting as aide-de-camp to General Brock
The Regiment was represented at the Coronation of His Majesty King George V and Queen Mary by Lt. Brister, R.S.M. Clarke, and Cpl. McMahon.
On 7 March, 1910 Lt. Col. W. S. Buell became the commanding officer and served until the outbreak of hostilities in 1914. In June of 1910 the Rifles were called out as “Aid To The Civil Power” during a riot in a Grand Trunk railway strike and remained on duty five days, after which they were relieved by a detachment of The Royal Canadian Regiment from Toronto.
On 2 June, 1911 the Regiment went into camp over the weekend at Fulford Point marching out from the Armouries on the evening of the 2nd and marching back on the evening of the 4th. On 1 July 1911 the Regiment took part in a manoeuvre with the 57th Battalion Peterborough Rangers who were paying a friendly visit to the city over the holiday. In August of the same year the Regiment again went to Niagara Falls on their annual outing.
In 1912 the Regiment went into camp from 6 June to 10 June at Barriefield being brigaded with the 14th P.W.O.R. Rifles (Kingston), the 43rd D.C.O. Rifles (Ottawa) and the 57th Peterborough Rangers, the work done belng tactical manoeuvres and musketry.
On 29 June the Regiment entrained for Peterborough where they were brigaded for Sunday 30 June and Monday 1 July with the 14th P.W.O.R. Rifles (Kingston) and the Peterborough Rangers. A most enjoyable outing was had and the Regiment marched back into the Armouries at Brockville early in the morning of 2 July 1912.
Representatives of the 41st Regiment at the Coronation of King George V, Lieut. Wm. H. Downey, Cpl. M. McMahon,
R.S.M. A. N. Clark
The Camp at Fulford Point June 1911.
Patrolling the G.T.R. Yards During the Railway
Strike, July 1910.
GRANDI
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On 19 August the Regiment provided a guard of honour to the Hon. Colonel Sam Hughes, Minister of Militia who came to Brockville to unveil the Brock Monument and Fountain erected by the General Brock Chapter of the Imperial Order of Daughters of the Empire. Following the ceremony the officers of the Regiment gave a garden party on the Armouries lawn.
On 29 October (Thanksgiving Day) the signallers of the Regiment attempted to get into communication by heliograph with Kingston via Blue Mountain. One post was placed on the roof of the Opera House while another party motored out to Charleston, ran down the lake by motor boat and climbed the mountain. No trouble was experienced in getting in touch with Brockville (19 miles away) but Kingston could not be seen owing to high ground intervening near Gananoque. The value of these experiments has been nullified by the development of wireless telegraphy since then, but at the time they were of great military importance. At that time there were no contoured maps or other guides to the heights that might intervene to simplify the search for other stations.
On 29 August a company of the Regiment under Captain H. H. Edwards took part in the centenary celebration of the Battle of Chrysler’s Farm near Morrisburg.
On 3 June 1914 the Regiment furnished a Guard of Honour to H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught on the occasion of his visit to the town as Governor General of Canada. The Guard was commanded by Capt. J. V. Browne.
Following the declaration of war with Germany on August 4th Lt.- Col. W. S. Buell offered his services in any capacity and on August 22nd the Regiment sent its first contribution to the Canadian Expeditionary force consisting of the following officers and men: Lt. Col. BUELL, W m. Senkler
Rfmn. MASON, Frank Licut. CURRY, Fred C.
Sgt. MATES, John A. Lieut. BRISTER, A. J.
Rfmn. McARTHY, John Lieut. EARLE, Rollo O.
Rfmn. MCDONALD, A. Rfmn. ACTON, Geo. D.
Rfmn. MCDOUGALL, L. C. Sgt. ABLARDE, H. C.
a Sgt. McGUIRE, J. T. Rfmn. ANDERSON, David
Rfmn. McGUIRE, Peter Corpl. ANDERSON, Alex
L Cpl. McGURK, Peter Rfmn. BABCOCK, Wm.
Rímn. MCLAUGHLIN, A. L. Rfmn. BALDWIN, Wm.
Sgt. MCMAHON, Michael Rfmn. BENDLOW, J.
Cpl. NOWLAN, Gordon Sign. BISNAW, Wm. A.
Rfmn. PASK, Clarence Rimn. BRADLEY, Edward
Rfmn. PENFOLD, John Rímn. BRALEY, Robt. E.
Rfmn. PIPE, Albert E. Rímn. BRAMLEY, P. A.
Rfmn. PORTER, Robert Sign. BRISTOW, J. J.
Rfmn. RAINEY, William Rímn. CARSE, Thomas
Rfmn. ROCHESTER, J. J. Rímn. CONN, Geo. D.
Rímn. ROCKETT, Gco. Rímn. COBURN, Allan L.
Rímn. RUSSELL, D. M. Rímn. COOPER, Thos.
Cpl. RUSSELL, T. D. Rímn. DORAN, Jeremy
Rímn. SAWYERS, D. M. Rfmn. DUNHAM, L. J.
Rfmn. SCOTT, Geo. H. Rfmn. DOW’N, James
Rfmn. SHEPPARD, W. J. a Sgt. FENNEL, George
Rfmn. SHOTTER, Wm. Rfmn. EASSON, J.
Rfmn. SIMPKINS, Ed Rímn. FLETCHER, Albert
Rfmn. SIMPSON, P. O. Sign. FREGO, John J.
Rfmn. STEWART, Norman Rfmn. GEARY, John
Rfmn. STEVENS, W. C. Rfmn. GLADMAN, Wm.
Rfmn. THORNTON, E. V. Rfmn. GLOVER, George
– Rfmn. TREVOR, Reginald Rfmn. GRANT, Harry
Rfmn. TYRRELL, A. J. Rfmn. GREGOIRE, J. A.
Rfmn. VINCENT, John M. Rfmn. GRIGG, A.
Rfmn. WADDY, H. C. Rfmn. GRIGG, B.
Rfmn. WARREN, Ennis Rfmn. GUMMER, Harry A.
Rfmn. WINES, Percy Rfmn. HAWKINS, Frank
Colr.-Sgt. WOODING, A. L. Sign. LING, Fred
Rfmn. WRIGHT, Harry V. Rfmn. MALONE, Edward
Rfmn. YARROW, C.
WORLD WAR I Lt. Col. W. S. Buell was in command when World War I broke out 4 Aug. 1914. He immediately offered his services and those of his Regiment. It is unfortunate that the Government did not accept the offer of the Regiment at this time. It was not to be the last such offer made, or the last declined.
On 22 August 1914 with three subalterns and thirty-nine other ranks, the full quota given to the Regiment, he left for Valcartier Camp
where the 1st Canadian Division was being mobilized. There this small detachment became part of the 2nd Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment. Lt. Col. Buell, however, went to the 4th Battalion, Central Ontario Regi
ment as second-in-command. Of the others who left the Rifles with their C.O., Lt. A. J. Brister and twelve men were killed in the gas attack by the Germans at St. Julien in April 1915. Lt. Col. Buell was wounded in the same engagement. Other enlistments soon followed.
When Lt. Col. Buell, the first man to enlist from Brockville, left the Regiment he was succeeded by Lt. Col. C. T. Wilkinson. Training continued in Brockville after the departure of the first contingent until the spring of 1915 when the Regiment functioned only as a training school for officers.
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(1567
CANADA
156th LEEDS AND GRENVILLE BATTALION
In the fall of 1915 the possibility of a County Battalion being raised for overseas service was mentioned, and in December 1915, authority was received from district headquarters to mobilize the 156th Leeds and Grenville Battalion C.E.E., by Lt. Col. C. T. Wilkinson. Lt. Col. J. A. McCammon was appointed provisional C.O. of the 156th Battalion and was in command until the latter part of December 1915. Lt. Col. Wilkinson took over until the end of April 1916, at which time Lt. Col. T. C. D. Bedell, lately returned from the 15th Battalion C.E.F. overseas, was given command, taking over 3 May, 1916. Other officers who at this early stage joined the battalion were Maj. A. M. Patterson, Maj. H. H. Ed
wards, Maj. R. J. Gill, Maj. G. W. Elliott, Maj. T. A. Kidd, Capt. G. R. Long, Capt. (Rev.) A. E. Hagar, Capt. P. B. Whiteley, Capt. W. N. Graham, and Capt. C. A. Donaldson.
On receipt of orders to mobilize, immediate action was taken to recruit members, and 14 recruiting offices were opened in the two counties. Recruiting Officers held meetings and men were brought to the Brockville Armouries for medical examination and the issue of uniforms with equipment, Battalion headquarters was at Brockville as well as “A” and “B” Companies whose men were drawn from Brockville, Gananoque, Lansdowne and Mallorytown and were provided quarters in the Brockville Fair Grounds. “C” Company area included Athens, Delta, Lyndhurst, Elgin, Newboro and Westport. The men of this company were trained in their own localities, where they were billeted by recruiting officers. “D” Company area included Prescott, Cardinal, Kemptville and Merrickville where the men received training while billeted in their homes. At Prescott, personnel were quartered in barracks at the Mansion House on Water street.
Recruiting efforts included meetings held at different points in the Counties at which civilian speakers were used.
In April 1916, the two Companies quartered at Brockville, with regimental band and stretcher bearers, left on a trek through Grenville County. The party stopped at Prescott the first night, Cardinal the second night, and through Shanly to Spencerville for the third night, Kemptville the fourth night, Burritt’s Rapids the fifth night, Merrickville the sixth night, and North Augusta the seventh night, returning to Brockville on the eighth day of trek.
One week later the other two companies left on a trek through Leeds County, going to Mallorytown, Lansdowne, Lyndhurst, Delta, Elgin, Toledo, Frankville, Athens, and returning to Brockville.
During both of these treks, the personnel were quartered in rinks, churches, town halls and fair grounds. Messing and cooking details were arranged for by quartermaster and staff of cooks. In many places the people of the Counties provided meals and did everything possible for the unit.
Through the generosity of the late Senator A. C. Hardy and family, instruments were presented to the Band.
During the early winter the unit was billeted in quarters at the Brockville Fair Grounds following the leaving for overseas of the S 9th Battalion, and in May the unit went to Barriefield, was placed under Canvas, and underwent training during the spring and summer of 1916.
Through the efforts of the General Brock Chapter 1.O.D.E., which carried on much work of value during the war, colors were presented at The Fair Grounds, Brockville on 17 August, 1916. The colors were procured through a subscription list opened by the Chapter of which Mrs. W. Fred Jackson was at the time Regent. After being inspected by Brig.-Gen. T. D. R. Hemming, Lt. Col. C. G. Williams, Chief Recruiting Officer, and Lt. Col. T. C. D. Bedell, the battalion formed a hollow square, the drums being piled in the form of an altar, from which the colors were presented to the color party by Lady White. The King’s color was received by L. K. C. Rowe, and the regimental color by Lt. George D. Woodcock. Other members of the color party were Bde. S. M. A. N. Clarke, C.S.M.’s C. H. Fox, E. J. Claxton and G. C. O’Shea.
Among those who spoke at the presentation were Sir Thomas White, M.P., Hon, Senator George Taylor, Hon. Dr. John D. Reid, M.P., Arthur C. Hardy, John R. Dargavel, M.P.P., A. E. Donovan, M.P.P., Andrew Ferguson, Warden of The United Counties, and Lt. Col. C. G. Williams,
During the proceedings the 1.O.D.E. presented Lt. Col. Bedell with a cheque for $160.00 to be used in buying comforts on arrival in England. Each man received a package of cigars, the gift of Mrs. G. T. Fulford, and a package of cigarettes, the gift of J. Gill Gardiner. In addition a barrel of tobacco, donated by well-wishers and gathered at MacDermott’s cigar store, was presented. Testaments were presented by Lady White.
On 11 November, 1916, the colors were placed on the memorial to General Wolfe in Westminster Abbey, the dedication ceremony conducted by the Dean in the presence of several officers and N.C.O.s of the battalion. There they remained until 1919 when they were brought back to Brock ville at the instance of the General Brock Chapter.
On 16 October the battalion entrained at Kingston for Halifax, sailing from that port on 19 October, 1916, on the SS Northland. The officers who accompanied the battalion were Lt. Col. T. C. D. Bedell,
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AIR FORCE CROSS Wickens, Capt. P., R.A.F.
HONORS AND AWARDS WORLD WAR I The following are some of the decorations won by Brockville men. Many of these men served with the Brockville Rifles or the units it perpetuates.
ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE Buell, Lt. Col. W. S., 4th Battalion
(Commander)
DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL Flanigan, Lt. J. E., 9 Bde. Sigs. Section Maloney, Pte. Mike, 38th Battalion Price, Maj. C. B., 14th Battalion Walton, Lt. H. B., Sth Cdn, Mounted Rifles
Maj. T. W. MacDowell, v.C., D.S.O.
VICTORIA CROSS MacDowell, Major Thain W., D.S.O., 38th Battalion
MILITARY MEDAL Angus, Cpl. A., 21st Battalion Barner, Pte, G. R., 2nd Battalion Clarke, Sgt. A. N., 21st Battalion Colville, C.S.M., A. M., 38th Battalion Cullum, Gnr. E. A., C.F.A. Fernie, Bdr. David, 33rd Bty. C.F.A. Flanigan, Lt. J. E., (with bar) 9 Bde. Sigs. Section Fraser, Sgt. W. A., R.A.F. Frego, Pte. John J., 2nd Battalion Grant, Cpl. G. H., 2nd Battalion Hourigan, Pte. Wilfred, 38th Battalion Lawson, Pte. James, 2nd Battalion McGuire, Sgt. James, 13th Battalion Mains, C.S.M. Thomas T., 26th Battalion Nicol, Pte. W. McL., 21st Battalion Saunders, Pte. A. B., P.P.C.L.I. Shotter, Cpl. F. C., 21st Battalion Simpson, Sgt. P. O., 1st Cdn. M. G. Battalion Smith, Cpl. D. W., 51st Battery C.E.A. Smith, Pre. H. E., 21st Battalion Sparling, H/Capt. J. Grant
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER Donaldson, Lt. Col. Anson S. (with bar) No. 3 Cdn. Fd. Ambulance Jones, Lt. Col. Elmer w. (with bar) 21st Battalion MacDowell, Maj. Thain W., V.C., 38th Battalion O’Donahoe, Lt. Col. J. V. P., 87th Battalion O’Donahoe, Maj. D. J., 47th Battalion Price, Maj. C. B., 14th Battalion
MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL Baker, Sgt. Maj. A. D., 4th Cdn. M. G. Battalion Snelson, Sgt. Robert, 11th Cdn. L.T.M. Battery Stephenson, C.S.M. Frank L., 21st Battalion
MILITARY CROSS Chapman, Lt. W. J., 2nd Battalion Fitzsimmons, 2nd Lt. H. H., R.A.F. Gill, Capt. R. J., 21st Battalion Gilmour, Capt. W. N., R.A.M.C. Graham, Capt. W. N., 31st Battalion Kincaid, Lt. H. R., R.A.F. Lewis, Lt. J. A., Royal Irish Regt. MacDowell, Lt. M. W., 4th C.M.R. MacLaren, Capt. J. H., C.F.A. Murphy, Capt. Sterndale, 3rd Battalion Richardson, Maj. R. H., (with bar) 8th Battalion
MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES Baker, Sgt.-Maj. A. D., 4th Cdn. M. G. Battalion Bowie, Lt. Col. R. A., C.A.M.C. Caldwell, Sgt. J. M., 75th Battalion Cockeram, Capt. A., 21st Battalion
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Donaldson, Lt. Col. A. S., C.A.M.C. Gilmour, Capt. W. N., R.A.M.C. Hiscox, C.S.M. W. N., 1st Battalion Jones, Lt. Col. E. W., 21st Battalion Kilgour, Lt. A. J., 4th Cdn. M. G. Company MacDowell, Maj. T. W., 38th Battalion Nichols, Pte. Frank J., P.P.C.L.I. O’Donahce, Maj. D. J., 47th Battalion O’Donahoe, Lt. Col. J. V. P., 87th Battalion Page, Flight-Lt. J. A., R.A.F. Stewart, Lt. Ross A., 21st Battalion Wilgress, Lt. G. K. K., 21st Battalion
BROUGHT TO NOTICE OF SECRETARY OF STATE FOR WAR Bowie, Lt. Col. R. A., C.A.M.C. Buell, Lt. Col. W. S., 4th Battalion
CROIX DE GUERRE (FRANCE) Carleton, Maj. Rev. W. B., C. Ch. S. Horan, Sgt. Thomas, American Expeditionary Force MacDowell, Lt. Cuyler M., Cdn. Siege Artillery O’Donahoe, Maj. D. J., 47th Battalion
LEGION OF HONOR (FRANCE) Lumb, Lt. Col. H. W., Suffolk Regiment
Gen. Williams appealed to the loyalty of all the officers present to assist in the reorganization, and a committee was nominated composed of Lt. Col. R. A. Bowie, Maj. R. J. Gill, M.C. and others to select an officer to act as Commanding Officer, subject to the approval of D.H.Q. Col. Bowie and his committee secured the consent of Lt. M. W. MacDowell, M.C. to accept the appointment, which was confirmed by M.D. No. 3 on 23 March 1920. Col. MacDowell commenced recruiting in the fall of 1920. Reorganization was authorized 1 November 1920 — General Order 253-1920.
When it came to deciding as to whether the new unit would be Rifles or Infantry, the officers were not unanimous, but as they had been informed that neither the 156th Battalion number, or colors could be secured it was decided to follow the Rifle traditions. Hardly had this been gazetted than the authorities reversed their decision and named us to perpetuate the 156th Battalion and to receive their colors. We thus became a Rifle Regiment with colors. It was subsequently decided to follow the Rifle traditions as far as colors were concerned, a policy which has persisted to this day.
A regrettable loss to the Regiment took place on 26 November 1920 when Lt. Col. R. A. Bowie was accidently killed by falling down an elevator shaft in St. Vincent de Paul Hospital. Following the death of Colonel Bowie, Captain E. B. Moles, who had served with distinction in France in World War I was appointed Medical Officer.
The first annual training following reorganization took place in January, February and March 1921 with the following establishment of officers: Commanding Officer:
Lt. Col. M. W. MacDowell, M.C. 2nd in Command:
Maj. J. R. Gill, M.C. Adjutant:
. Maj.
S. J. Montgomery Musketry Officer:
Capt.
G. F. Hollington Signalling Officer:
J. E. Flanigan, D.C.M., M.M. Quartermaster:
Capt.
R. F. Craig Medical Officer:
Capt.
E. B. Moles Paymaster:
. Maj.
A. M. Patterson Chaplain:
. Capt.
A. F. C. Whalley “A” Company:
Maj.
F. C. Curry Capt.
S. G. H. Steele, M.C. Lt.
W. R. Bannerman
A. J. Koehler Lt.
C. A. McCalpin Lt.
A. W. Reynolds “B” Company:
W. A. Delahaye, M.C. Capt.
W. H. Comstock Lt.
L. S. Beattie Lt.
C. E. Fraser Lt.
H. R. Starr
ORDER OF THE CROWN (BELGIUM) Lumb, Lt. Col. H. W., Suffolk Regiment
ORDER OF ST. GEORGE (RUSSIA) Dunham, Flight-Lt. L. J., R.N.A.S.
. Lt.
SERVICE MEDAL (ITALY) Giroux, Sgt.-Maj. A. P., R.A.S.C.
Lt.
BETWEEN TWO WARS 1919 – 1939 Following World War I the Militia was again reorganized.
A meeting of officers of the 41st Regiment, former officers, and officers demobilized from the C.E.F., was called by Brig. Gen. V. A. S.
Williams, C.M.G., D.0.C. M.D. No. 3, in the Officers’ Mess at the Brockville Armouries in January 1920 for the purpose of discussing the reorganization of the local Regiment.
Maj.
32
19

“C” Company:
Maj.
D. R. Fowler Capt.
J. R. McCullough Lt.
C. A. Beattie Lt.
W. E. Cowan Lt.
C. R. McHenry Lt.
C. F. Swayze
J. A. O’Donahoe Capt.
N. L. MacDowell Lt.
F. R. Gilbert Lt.
G. R. Johnston Lt. H. M. McLean Lt.
H. F. VanDusen
“D” Company:-
Maj.
On 17 September 1921 Maj. R. J. Gill, M.C. was seconded to 9th Inf. Bde. as Bde. Major and Major F. C. Curry was appointed 2nd in Command on 20 May 1922.
In December 1921 the strength was 30 officers and 312 other ranks. In June 1923 the strength was 31 officers and 243 other ranks and on 1 January 1924, 31 officers and 261 other ranks.
H.R.H. The Prince of Wales visited Brockville in October 1921 and a Guard of Honor was furnished by The Brockville Rifles under command of Maj. S. J. Montgomery. On 21 May 1925 His Excellency The Governor General Lord Byng visited Brockville and a Guard of Honor was provided by the Regiment under the command of Lt. Col. M. W. MacDowell, M.C.
For the training season 1924-1925 The Brockville Rifles Signal Section were the winners of the Dominion Challenge Cup. Capt. J. E. Flanigan, D.C.M., M.M., Lt. H. A. Taylor, Sgt. E. Shotter, M.M., Cpl. L. Dutton and Cpl. W. D. Wetherell with Riflemen A. Buell, S. Buell, E. Clark, R. Clark, De Wolfe, L. W. Ferguson, Hamilton, Henderson, Leeder, McClellan, Quirmbach, Robinson, R. Shorey, S. Shotter, Smith and W. J. Wetherell were members of the section.
The Brockville War Memorial was unveiled on Friday 23 May 1924 by the Rt. Hon. Geo. P. Graham, P.C., LLD., Minister of Railways and Canals. Through the efforts of Mayor W. B. Reynolds and Council the Memorial had been erected. Members of The Brockville Rifles under command of Lt. Col. M. W. MacDowell, M.C. attended the service. Three volleys were fired after which the Last Post was sounded. The B.C.J. and Public School Cadets paraded with the Regiment. The Memorial was dedicated by Hon. Capt. A. F. C. Whalley, Chaplain.
On 30 October 1925 Lt. Col. M. W. MacDowell, M.C., turned over command of the Regiment to Lt. Col. R. J. Gill, M.C., who returned to the Regiment from 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade. Lt. Col. MacDowell was transferred to and assumed command of the 2nd Reserve Battalion of The Regiment.
WINNERS OF DOMINION CHALLENGE CUP 1924-25
Standing: Lt. Col. M. W. MacDowell, M.C., Capt. J. E. Flanigan, D.C.M., M.M., Cpl. Dutton, Ptes. Robinson, Clark, Clark McCellan, A. Buell, Ferguson, W. J. Wetherell, G. Quirmbach, Cpl. W. D. Wetherell, Lieut. Taylor, Major Montgomery. Kneeling: Left to Right Ptes. S. Shotter, Leeder, Smith, Shorey, Hamilton, De Wolf, Henderson, R. Buell. Seated: Signal Sgt. C. Shotter, M.M.
34
20

Copy
An event of unusual and lasting interest to the Regiment occurred during this period. Reference is here made to the affiliation of The Brockville Rifles with The King’s Royal Rifle Corps of the Imperial Army. A letter had been received by The Regiment, just previous to the recent change in command, from Lt. Gen. W. Pitcairn Campbell, Colonel-Commandant, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps, inviting The Brockville Rifles to becor e affiliated with his corps. For purpose of record his letter and The Brock ville Rifles letter in reply thereto are herein set out.
The Armouries, Brockville, Ontario,
November 10th, 1925.
Lieut.-General W. Pitcairn Campbell, Colonel Commandant, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps, London, S.W.I.
THE CELER ET AUDAX CLUB GENERAL COMMITTEE, LTD. Telephone:
71 Eccleston Square Victoria 2116
London, S.W.I.
12th October, 1925. ne Officer Commanding The Brockville Rifles
Brockville, Ontario.
Sir,
With reference to War Office Letter 31/ General No. 2682 (A.G. 8.b) of 31st August last, I, as Colonel Commanding of The King’s Royal Rifle Corps, write to ask if your Regiment would wish to be affiliated to my Regiment. If so, I shall be most pleased to notify your wishes to our War Office.
I understand that you must submit an official application for alliance to the Government Department of your Dominion.
You may be sure that The King’s Royal Rifle Corps will always be pleased to help your Regiment in any way possible.
Yours sincerely,
W. PITCAIRN CAMPBELL Lieut.-General Colonel Commandant,
The King’s Royal Rifle Corps.
Sir:
Your valued letter of Oct. 12th, suggesting the affiliation of the Brockville Rifles, with The King’s Royal Rifle Corps, was received and very greatly appreciated.
May I say, Sir, that I accept on behalf of the Officers and Men of this Regiment, the invitation you have extended and am applying to the Dept. of National Defence, at Ottawa, through the District Officer Commanding, at Kingston, for the necessary permission.
I have just taken over the command of this Unit and nothing gave me greater pleasure than to learn of this proposed move, which will add greatly, to the historical interest of the Regiment and will tend to stimulate added interest in its affairs. The history of our Unit is being brought up to date by a Committee of Officers and a copy will be sent you, Sir, which I trust will prove of interest to you and your Officers.
Again may I thank you for your courteous and kindly letter and may I assure you that it will always be the endeavour of every individual in the Brockville Rifles, to show such appreciation by never forgetting that in addition to keeping our own Regimental reputation up to its present high standard, we will now have in some part at least, the very high reputation of the K.R.R. Corps, to keep up and I assure you, Sir, it will always be our endeavour to prove ourselves worthy of your confidence, as shown in inviting us to affiliate ourselves with your Corps.
Yours respectfully, (R. J. GILL) Lieut-Col. Commanding
The Brockville Rifles. After the necessary application had been made by the Brockville Rifles through District Headquarters to the Department of National Defence for permission to have the affiliation sanctioned, a letter was received, advising the Rifles that such above affiliation had been approved by His Majesty The King. A copy of this letter is also herein recorded. G. WB.
K. 24-1-131
Brockville Rifles Crest used prior to the Alliance with the K.R.R.C.
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21

DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE
(Militia Service)
Kingston, Ont., 9th April, 1926. The Officer Commanding 8th Infantry Brigade
Ottawa, Ont. Affiliation of the Brockville Rifles with the King’s Royal Rifle Corps.
I am directed to inform you that information has now been received from National Defence Headquarters to the effect that His Majesty, The King has been graciously pleased to approve of the alliance of the Brockville Rifles to the King’s Royal Rifle Corps.
It is stated that this alliance will appear in Army Orders and be republished in General Orders in due course.
The Officer Commanding the Brockville Rifles has been notified direct.
(F. W. HILL) Colonel (Hon. Brig.-General)
A.A. & Q.M.G., M.D. No. 3 O.C. Brockville Rifles Copy for your information.
Colonel (Hon. Brig.-General)
A.A. & Q.M.G., M.D. No. 3
Members of Color Party. 1929LLt. Col. R. J. Gill. M.C.Lt. Col. F. C. Curry, V.D., C.S.M. E.). Claxton Oil. kGill, M.C., Lt. Col. F. C. Curry, V.D., C.S.M. E. J. Claxton, Lieut. C. A. Beattie, C.Q.M.S. J. H. Mallette, Lieut. H. A. Taylor, C.Q.M.S. H. A. Morton, R.S.M. A, N. Clark, M.M.
Changes in the cap badge made necessary to conform with K.R.R.C. traditions were approved by His Majesty from designs submitted by
Major F. C. Curry, V.D. The former cap badge had to be redesigned. In addition to removing the “41” and “Crossed Rifles” the wording had to be taken off the belted Garter and an “annulus” substituted bearing “Brockville Rifles”. The crown had to be changed as the old badge carried a Tudor Crown.
In 1928 changes were made in the Lecture Room. Part of the old shooting gallery was converted to a kitchen and store room for band instruments resulting in improved facilities for lectures and social events,
During Lt. Col. Gill’s command the Rifles three times took second place in No. 3 Military District Infantry Association Competitions, being beaten only by the Governor-General’s Foot Guards of Ottawa. In 1929 the Brass Band playing in competition with many military and civilian bands at Ogdensburg, N.Y., won the Challenge Cup.
The Rt. Hon. G. P. Graham, P.C., LL.D., was appointed Honorary Colonel and Lt. Col. W. S. Buell, C.B.E., V.D., was Honorary LieutenantColonel in May 1926.
In October 1929 Lt. Col. F. C. Curry, V.D. took command of the Unit. His first official act on 10 November, 1929 was the Depositing of the Colors of the 156th Bn. C.E.F. which had been returned from their
war-time resting place on Wolfe’s Tomb in Westminster Abbey. This impressive ceremony took place in St. Peter’s Anglican Church in Brockville. Officiating at the ceremony was Capt. the Rev. A. F. C. Whalley, D.D., Rector of the Church and Regimental Chaplain, in the presence of Brigadier W. B. Anderson, C.M.G., D.S.O., the District Officer Commanding. Members of the Color Party were Lt. C. A. Beattie, King’s Color, Lt. H. A. Taylor, Regimental Color, R.S.M. A. N. Clarke, M.M., C.S.M. E. J. Claxton, C.Q.M.S. H. A. Morton, C.Q.M.S. J. H. Mallette.
Lt. Col. Gill said farewell to the Regiment on his transfer to the 9th Brigade as Brigade Major.
Lt. Col. Curry appointed Major J. R. McCullough as his second-incommand, the signals officer was Capt. J. Flanigan and later Lt. Harold Taylor. O. E. Charlton was R.S.M.
22

On August 6, 1937 the Cadet Corps of the Brockville Collegiate Institute and Vocational School (No. 113 Cadet Corps) became affiliated with the Regiment,
The Regiment was represented at the Coronation of King George VI by C.S.M. O. E. Charlton.
Major John Power, a former commanding-officer died on 19 September 1935 and was buried at Maitland.
In 1930 the K.R.R.C. celebrated the Centenary of the day on which King William IV was pleased to give it the title of “The King’s Royal Rifle Corps.”
This period was referred to as the lean thirties, a period when Militia Estimates were cut to the bone. A new s” gun purchased for a test had to be camouflaged as a drill shed in Quebec. Colonel Curry and Major Ted McKay went to Petawawa to see its first shoot. Boots were not provided at this time, though they were provided for the Cadet Corps. A field inspection had to be cancelled because the men’s boots were so bad. In fact some had only running shoes. This period of austerity ruled out summer camps, and there were no detached units.
During the winter of 1930 the Regiment lost the services of a very valuable warrant-officer by the transfer to the 9th Inf. Bde. of R.S.M. A. N. Clarke, M.M. on his appointment as Brigade Sergeant-Major. Sgt.-Major Clarke had over 25 years service with the Regiment and had represented the Battalion at the Coronation of His Majesty King George V. On the departure of the First Division to World War I he was granted a commission as lieutenant and qualified for this rank but resigned later to become regimental sergeant-major of the 156th Battalion in which rank he proceeded overseas winning the military medal, and being severely wounded. On his return and the reorganization of the Rifles he preferred to retain his warrant rank and was taken on strength as R.S.M.
The unit trained on Lee Enfield rifles of American manufacture for which there was no ammunition. Annual classification was fired with Ross Rifles. There were four Lewis Guns. The signal section won the District Cup in 1932.
At this time the annual band grant from the town was cut in half to $1,000. The officers were unable to raise the additional money to pay the bandmaster, and the band refused to turn out. Since the bandsmen were nearly all over age they were retired and a Bugle Band, and Fife and Drum Corps formed. The band grant was paid that year but the Unit was advised that it would not be paid the next year unless there was a brass band.
From February 1933 to August 1936 Lt. Col. J. R. McCullough, V.D., commanded the Regiment. Under his command the unit continued to maintain the high standard of training which many of them would soon be called upon to put into practice.
On 31 Oct. 1935 Col. R. J. Gill, M.C., V.D., retired as Commander 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade and was appointed Hon. Lt. Col. of the Durham Regiment.
Upon the retirement of Lt. Col. McCullough, Lt. Col. N. L. MacDowell, E.D., another member of the family which has figured so prominently in the history of our unit, became the commanding officer of The
Brockville Rifles. In his capable hands the unit was to play its part in training for a Second World War.
The Rt. Hon. G. P. Graham,
P.C., LL.D.
R.S.M. O. E. Charlton, M.B.E.
OFFICERS – THE BROCKVILLE RIFLES – IZTH MAY, 1937
RELEA
C.Kr. C.R. Malley, C.BB. Cada BACK BOWLleu. A. Inisia. Llew Lem, Cape G. Johnston Cap. W. S. C. LE MAN, LAMPU
40
41
23

The Brockville Rifles Regimental Band_12th May 1937 (Winners of Class “B” Band Trophy at C.N.E.)
FRONT ROW–W, Kirkby, W. E. Charlton, H. E. Algie, K. G. Jackson, E. T. Reilly, Lieut. J. W. S. Lomas, W. Warner, R. W. Swift, D. C. Knowlton, Corporal SECOND ROW–Sergt. A. G. Forrester, A. W. Row, W. E. Close, A. C. Runciman, A. C. Earle, S. Shotter, D. A. Shotter, I. Rothwell, G. J. Danby, A. MeBACK ROW—G. B. Serviss. C. Robinson, J. H. Moulson, W. A. Reddick, J. A. Seamark, W. Mott, F. N. Wetherell, Serget, J. P. Mepham, C. W. Knapp. R. E.
W. B. Anderson. Combie, Sergt. C. W. Wilson. Parsons.
THE REGIMENT IN WORLD WAR II The Militia of Canada over the years has played an outstanding and commendable role in the history of Canada, and the Brock ville Rifles played no small part in contributing to this record. Regimental activities during the years of World War II confirm the magnitude of that contribution.
With the outbreak of World War II in September 1939, guards were mounted at the Armouries, and an intensive training and recruiting campaign was begun, to bring the Brockville Rifles up to full strength. At this time the nominal roll of officers was as follows: Hon. Colonel
Rt. Hon. G. P. Graham, P.C., LL.D. Hon. Lt. Col.
Mr. G. T. Fulford, B.A. Officer Commanding
Lt. Col. N. L. MacDowell, E.D. Second In Command
Major W. H, Comstock, E.D. Adjutant
Captain T. R. Gray Asst. Adjutant
2 Lt. W. A. Todd Paymaster
Lt. F. K. Goldie Medical Officer
Major D. B. Code a’ Medical Officer
Capt. H. E. Preston Chaplain
Capt. J. G. Sparling, M.M. Regimental Historian
Hon. Lt. Col. R. E. Craig, V.D. Headquarters Company
Maj. W. H. Comstock, E.D., Commander
Capt. G. A. Beale, 2nd in Command 2 Lt. E. M. Patton
No. 1 Platoon Signalling Officer 2 Lt. P. A. Tooker
No. 2 Platoon 2 Lt. B. D. Madden
No. 3 Platoon 2 Lt. W. H. Seamark
No. 5 Platoon Major R. H. Sheridan, E.D.
No. 6 Platoon Quartermaster Capt. A. I. Munro
No. 6 Platoon Transport Officer “A” Company
Major C. A. Beattie, E.D., Commander Capt. J. P. MacNaughton,
2nd in Command Lt. A. M. Patterson Lt. A. W. Davison 2 Lt. R. E. Morden
2 Lt. C. J. Ireton “B” Company
Major G. R. Johnston, Commander Capt. J. J. Keir, 2nd in Command Lt. L. W. Code Lt. E. W. Whelpton 2 Lt. A. B. Henderson 2 L. H. E. Gardiner
24

“C” Company
Major H. A. Taylor, Commander Capt. D. H. Mallory, 2nd in Command Lt. J. A. Lord 2 Lt. W. H. Remmer 2 Lt. P. duG. Makepeace 2 Lt. J. R. Dowell Major D. E. Lewis, Commander Capt. H. S. White, 2nd in Command Lt. L. E. Fox 2 Lt. G. A. Robinson 2 Lt. C. E. Makepeace 2 Lt. R. G. Gardner
“D” Company
Officers on Command Captain H. W. Pearson, m.s.c., G.S.O. III at H.Q., M.D. No. 3, Kingston Hon. Lt. Col. R. E. Craig, V.D., appointed Regimental Historian, 22 9 39.
As a result of World War II many changes took place in the Non Permanent Active Militia which also effected the Brockville Rifles. It was expected at the outbreak of hostilities that the Brockville Rifles would be mobilized as a unit, but when this failed to occur many officers and men began to join other units such as The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, The Royal Canadian Artillery, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps, Royal Canadian Air Force, Defence Headquarters, Canadian Army (R) Training Centres, which were recruiting locally.
On 4 June, 1940 District Headquarters offered the Brockville Rifles an opportunity to raise No. 2 Company for the Stormont Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders. Without hesitation the offer was accepted. A Medical Board was set up and commenced examining on 20 June 1940 for officers and other ranks.
Lt. Col. W. J. Franklin, M.C., V.D., who was given command of the S.D. & G., chose the following as officers for No. 2 Company: Major D. E. Lewis, E.D., Major C. A. Beattie, E.D., Capt. J. P. MacNaughton, Lt. E. W. Whelpton, 2 Lt. R. E. Morden. Recruiting for this Company was begun on 21 June, 1940. Training commenced at the Armouries, and continued until 5 September, 1940, when the Company moved to Kingston.
The Veteran’s Guard of Canada was formed and Major C. M. MacDowell was chosen to command the local company. Officers included in the local establishment were: Lt. H. W. Aitken, Lt. G. M. Lyons, Lt. M. S. McLean. This Company comprised of some 65 men, and from their ranks many were sent to guard duty at vulnerable points, and Internment Camps.
On 28 June, 1940 authority was received from D.H.Q. to increase the strength of The Brockville Rifles to the war establishment of 779
all ranks, and the period of training was increased from 10 to 30 days. This was a considerable change from the strength of 200 which had been the establishment in former years. By 15 August, 1940 the full complement had been reached. A 14 day camp at Petawawa followed.
On 28 June, 1940 plans were commenced for the opening of a Training Centre at the old Fair Grounds, north of the town. Actual building operations commenced August 13 and by October 1940, 30 buildings had been erected which accommodated 720 men. One of the factors which influenced the selection of Brockville for this centre was the availability of a cadre of officers and N.C.O.s who had been trained through Provisional Schools organized and conducted by the Regiment.
The Brockville Rifles Rifle Association, which had been in operation for many years, was disbanded on 13 August, 1940, for the duration of the war. Ammunition was not available. Other activities carried out by the unit, and the loss of trained personnel to Active Force Units and Training Centres, made it impossible to carry on.
G.O, 139, of July 1939, was issued authorizing officers and men of the N.P.A.M. to be called out for administrative and training duties. The Brockville Rifles was authorized to have a C.O., adjutant, quarter
master, two clerks, and three assistant instructors, and for a de-centralized company: one company officer, one C.Q.M.S., one clerk, and one assistant instructor. All positions were immediately filled by members of Tlse i Brockville Rifles. Among those who served under this authority were Lt. Col. N. L. MacDowell, E.D., Maj. H. R. Sheridan, E.D., Capt. G. A. Robinson, Capt. E. J. Parish, Capt. W. H. Remmer, R.S.M. O. E. Charlton, M.B.E., C.Q.M.S. R. Louis, Sgts. J. D. Cooper, W. Bennett, W. S. Watson, R. Giffin, J. Boisvert, R. Dickinson.
On 19 July, 1940, D.H.Q. authorized de-centralization of the Unit, and “D” Company was formed under the command of Major A. M. Watchorn, E.D., with platoons at Kemptville, Merrickville and Cardinal.
During the year 1940, the following personnel left the Unit for service in Active Force Units and to Training Centres.
Date
OFFICERS Rank and Name
To What Unit Hon. Lt.-Col. R. E. Craig, V.D.
C.A.S.F. Major D. E. Lewis
S.D. & G.H. Major C. A. Beattie, E.D.
S.D. & G.H. Major H. A. Taylor
R.C.O.C. Major H. R. Starr, E.D.
C.A. (R) T.C. Major D. B. Code (RCAMC)
C.A. (R) T.C. Capt. T. R. Gray
H. & P.E. Capt. L. E. Fox
C.A. (R) T.C. Capt. J. J. Keir
C.A. (R) T.C. Capt. H. E. Preston
.C.A. (R) T.C.
25-1-40 20-6-40 20-6-40 20-1-40 10-10-40
5-10-40 19-4-40
6-9-40 8-10-40 5-10-40
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a Sgt.
McNaull, J. C. a Sgt.
Nicholls, P. H. a Sgt.
Robinson, C. M. a Sgt.
Shotter, H. a Sgt.
Stewart, E. T. a Sgt.
White, C. D. Cpl.
Anderson, W. B. Cpl.
Boyle, G. A. Cpl.
Glenn, J. F. Cpl.
Hodge, C. E. Cpl.
Marshall, T. Cpl.
Miller, A. F. Cpl.
Monger, H. E. Cpl.
Shotter, D. A. a Cpl.
Bunce, D. C. a Cpl.
Darling, W. D. a Cpl. Elliott, G. H. a Cpl.
Foster, S. E. W. W. a Cpl.
Scott, L. a Cpl.
Shotter, S. a Cpl.
Simpson, S. W. L Cpl.
Avon, J. G. J. L Cpl.
Forbes, K. J. L Cpl.
Guest, T. S. L Cpl. Jackson, K. G. L Cpl. Jakes, L. H. L Cpl.
Kay, W. H. L Cpl.
Martin, C. E. I. Cpl.
Martin, C. R. L Cpl.
Owen, E. H. L Cpl.
Quirmbach, G. L Cpl.
Shearer, J. L Cpl.
Watkinson, R. J.
.R.C.A. .S.D. & G.H. -0.A.C., COTC .S.D. & G.H. .C.A. (R) T.C.
S.D. & G.H. R.C.A. O.T.C. C.A. (R) T.C. C.A. (ROT.C. S.D. & G.H. C.A. (R) T.C. S.D. & G.H. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. S.D. & G.H. .R.C.O.C.
S.D. & G.H. .R.C.A.F. .S.D. & G.H. .R.C.A.S.C. .R.C.A.F. .C.A. (R) T.C. ..C.A. (R) T.C.
O.T.C. (Brock.) .O.T.C. (Brock.)
C.A. (R) T.C. C.A. (R) T.C. C.A. (R) T.C. R.C.N.V.R. C.A. (R) T.C. C.A. (R) T.C. C.A. (R) T.C.
16-7-40 21-6-40 27-9-40 21-6-40
6-9-40 20-6-40 16-7-40 10-10-40
9-9-40 5-10-40 20-6-40 4-10-40 23-6-40 20-12-40 31-10-40 20-6-40 20-1-40 21-6-40 20-6-40
8-7-40 27-3-40 10-10-40 8-10-40
6-9-40 10-10-40
4-10-40 8-10-40 4-10-40
6-9-40 17-11-40
6-9-40 8-10-40 4-10-40
AIVAL. HINUVIVINT
“B” COY BROCKVILLE RIFLES AT PETAWAWA, 1940
NČAL
RIFLEMEN Rank and Name
To What Unit Rfn. Alberry, D. S.
.R.C.A.F. Alguire, G. L…
.R.C.A.F. Amyote, M. F. W.
.R.C.N.V.R. Baile, E. C.
.S.D. & G.H. Bain, W.
..S.D. & G.H. Baker, E.
.C.A.S.E. Ball, E.
R.C.A.F. Barnes, L. W.
R.C.A.S.C. Billings, C. H.
H. & P.E. Bishop, R. W.
S.D. & G.H. Blair, E. T.
S.D. & G.H. Blair, L. A.
C.A.S.F.
Date 5-11-40 12-4-40 19-12-40
8-7-40 23-6-40 28-3-40
5-4-40 10-8-40 24-1-40 21-6-40 20-6-40 13-7-40
48
49
27

Blanchard, M. Boyd, A. J. Box, H. E. Bradley, F. Brayman, C. E. Brennan, G. I. Burns, E. J. Burns, W. P. Carr, H. D. Casselman, R. C. Chaplin, S. C. Chapman, A. Clark, A. R. Clow, D. L. Cooper, E. Cooper, J. L. Cousins, G. B. Cox, J. S. Cox, T. P. J. Crowder, R. W. L. Cumming, C. Curry, P. Davis, H. Deane, W. H. Deir, E. J. Delaney, V. E. Dewar, K. P. Dietz, J. R. Dillon, D. M. Dorman, C. W. Dunlay, R. J. Dunleavy, J. R. Dunn, A. E. Earl, L. G. Easton, F. E. Elliott, A. E. Elliott, R. E. Ferguson, R. L. Fetterly, E. K. Forten, A. P. Fox, H. E. Fraser, J. A. Gagne, P. Geneau, M. C. J. Gibson, C. A. Gifford, B. D. Gifford, G. J. Giffin, T. G. Gill, C. J.
R.C.H.A. C.A.S.F. S.D. & G.H. S.D. & G.H. R.C.E. R.C.N. S.D. & G.H. .S.D. & G.H. .S.D. & G.H. .C.A.S.F. ..C.A. (R) T.C. .C.A.S.F. .R.C.A.F. .S.D. & G.H. .S.D. & G.H. .C.A.S.E.
H, & P.E. R.C.A.F. A.E. Arty. C.A. (R) T.C. S.D. & G.H. S.D. & G.H. R.C.N. C.A. (R) T.C. C.A. (R) T.C. S.D. & G.H. R.C.A.F. S.D. & G.H. C.A. (R) T.C. S.D. & G.H. R.C.O.C. S.D. & G.H. S.D. & G.H.
R.C.O.C. .R.C.A.F. .R.C.O.C.
R.C.O.C. C.A. (R) T.C. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F.
C.A.S.F. .C.A. (R) T.C.
C.A. (R) T.C. R.C.N.V.R. S.D. & G.H. R.C.N.V.R. R.C.A.S.C. .S.D. & G.H.
C.A. (R) T.C.
27-3-40 28-3-40 23-6-40
8-7-40 10-8-40 19-9-40 26-6-40 26-6-40 23-6-40
5-7-40 S-10-40
1-8-40 27-12-40 21-6-40
23-6-40 11-12-40
28-3-40 12-8-40
5-4-40 11-12-40
1-7-40 21-7-40 26-9-40 5-10-40 5-10-40 23-6-40 17-12-40
8-7-40 5-10-40 20-6-40 12-12-40 20-6-40
8-7-40 27-3-40 26-9-40 20-1-40 27-6-40
9-9-40 20-2-40 28-3-40
5-7-40 5-11-40 5-10-40 7-11-40 27-6-40 20-6-40 8-11-40 20-6-40 5-10-40
“C” COY BROCKVILLE RIFLES AT PETAWAWA, 1940
50
51
28

Graham, R. M. Gray, G. H. Guilboard, A. Gunness, C. F. Hawkins, O. Hampton, E. L. Harper, W. J. Harper, W. J. Haynes, O. W. Herbison, W. Heasler, W. J. Higgins, E. Hillocks, G. Hinton, J. W. Hone, M. Hooker, J. R. Hov, W. Y. Huddlestone, F. Hunter, A. Jackson, A. E. Jackson, K. G. Jackson, W. J. Jacques, A. J. Johnstone, S. S. Kennedy, J. H. Kirkby, S. H. Kirkby, W. T. Lacasse, E. M. Latimer, C. B. Latimer, K. A. Layfield, W. C. Lavine, J. M. Latham, E. B.. Leeder, E. M. Leeder, B. H. Levick, L. H. Lee, W. C. Long, H. F. Mallory, C. J. Mallory, C. W. Makepeace, R. R. Manbard, H. N. Marcell, C. E. Markell, D. G. Martin, C. D. Maunsell, T. R. McCrady, D. R. McKay, W. J. McIntyre, J.
|
C.A.S.F. R.C.A. R.C.A.F. S.D. & G.H. R.C.H.A. R.C.A.M.C. C.A.S.F. R.C.N.V.R. C.A. (R) T.C. C.A. (R) T.C. R.C.A.F. R.C.N.V.R. R.C.H.A. S.D. & G.H. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. C.A. (R)T.C. C.A. (R) T.C. R.C.A.S.C.
C.A. (R) T.C. .C.A. (R) T.C. .C.A.S.F.
S.D. & G.H. .C.A.S.F. .C.A. (R) T.C. .S.D. & G.H. .S.D. & G.H. .R.C.A.F. .C.A.S.E. .C.A.S.F. .C.A. (R) T.C. .R.C.A. .R.C.A.F. .S.D. & G.H. .R.C.N.V.R. .C.A. (R) T.C. .C.A. (R) T.C.
A.F. S.D. & G.H. .R.C.N.V.R. .Galt Air Tech. .R.C.A.F. .C.A. (R) T.C. .S.D. & G.H. .C.A. (R) T.C. .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A. .S.D. & G.H. .S.D. & G.H.
20-9-40 19-11-40 12-11-40 21-6-40 27-3-40 27-3-40
S-7-40 17-11-40 5-10-40
5-10-40 20-12-40 26-9-40 27-3-40 21-6-40 15-11-40 27-6-40 12-9-40 7-10-40
5-8-40 S-10-40
9-9-40 24-9-40 20-6-40 8-10-40 S-10-40 25-6-40 21-6-40 4-9-40 2-8-40 27-8-40 5-10-40 27-3-40 12-11-40
8-7-40 19-12-40 13-12-40 5-10-40
2-5-40 26-6-40 10-12-40 18-2-40 17-8-40 5-10-40 21-6-40 8-10-40 1-11-40 20-6-40 20-6-40 20-6-40
IT HATIT
“D” COY BROCKVILLE RIFLES AT PETAWAWA, 1940
52
53
29

Mcllvenna, T. J. McLeod, D. A.. MacNaull, A…… MacNaull, J. McKee, W. C. McDougall, H. P. McNutt, R. J. P. Moden, F. P. Moulton, R. B. Monger, W. E. . Munro, I. T. Murray, L. R. Neil, R. B. O’Hara, G. F. O’Neill, G. Opre, R. Pankhurst, N. C. Pankhurst, P. F. … Pakeman, J. S. Pattemore, B. Pearson, B. W. C. Pelow, G. B. Power, W. Pulford, E. Pullen, W. L. Purser, A. E. Read, H. T. Robertson, R. A. Saunders, D. F. Shire, C. Shanks, J. J. Shorey, J. H. Simpson, W. Skelton, W. H. Smith, L. R. Stillwell, L. W. Stembridge, A. J. Stafford, R. Stotts, H. Sterritt, J. Swift, R. W. Tyo, M. D. Ufford, D. A. Vancamp, W. W. Watson, W. H. M. Webster, C. H. White, F. White, A. C. Whiteland, J. E.
.C.A. (R) T.C. .A.F. .C.A. (R) T.C. .A.F. .C.A. (R) T.C.
C.A. (R) T.C.
C.A.S.E. .O.T.C. Toronto .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F. .C.A. (R) T.C. .S.D. & G.H. .C.A. (R) T.C. .R.C.A.
S.D. & G.H. .R.C.H.A. .H. & P.E.
H. & P.E. .C.A. (R) T.C. S.D. & G.H. R.C.A.F. Vets. Guard S.D. & G.H. C.A. (R) T.C. S.D. & G.H. S.D. & G.H.
H. & P.E. S.D. & G.H.
H, & P.E. R.C.H.A. C.A. (R) T.C. C.A. (R) T.C. Vets. Guard C.A.S.F. C.A.S.F. R.C.N.V.R. S.D. & G.H. S.D. & G.H.
R.C.A.S.C. .C.A.S.E. .R.C.A.F. S.D. & G.H. C.A.S.F. H. & P.E. S.D. & G.H. C.A.S.F. Vets, Guard
R.C.A.F. .C.A. (R) T.C.
5-10-40
5-4-40 5-10-40 16-7-40 5-10-40 5-10-40 12-10-40 26-9-40 8-10-40 24-1-40 5-10-40
8-7-40 13-12-40 24-8-40 21-6-40 27-3-40
1-8-40 2-5-40 5-10-40
8-7-40 28-1-40 20-6-40 21-7-40 5-10-40 26-6-40 20-6-40
2-5-40 24-6-40 30-4-40 27-3-40 4-10-40
4-2-40 3-10-40 30-5-40 12-10-40 7-11-40 20-6-40 28-6-40
S-4-40 25-7-40
27-8-40 18-11-40 20-12-40
5-7-40 21-6-40 30-7-40
15-8-40 30-10-40
5-10-40
“HQ” COY BROCKVILLE RIFLES AT PETAWAWA, 1940
55
54
30

Whiteland, S. H. Whiteland, E. J.-. Wilson, H. J. Williams, J. Wright, J. H. Wood, V. J. Wylie, J. J. Yeldon, D. F.
S.D. & G.H. S.D. & G.H.
C.A.S.E. C.A. (R) T.C. C.A.S.F. R.C.A.F. H. & P.E. C.A. (R) T.C.
21-6-40 23-6-40 15-8-40
4-10-40 20-12-40 22-2-40
2-5-40 5-10-40
Rank and Name
Lieut. J. M. Carroll 2/ Lieut. L. W. Code
Lieut. McL, Houze
Lieut. H. P. Smith 2 / Lieut. P. A. Tooker
OFFICERS
To What Unit A.F. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. .A.F.
Date 19-3-41 14-2-41 2-2-41
6-7-41 12-11-40
Rank and Name CSM.
Hellyer, F. J.– CSM.
Warren, D. M. Sgt.
Buell, W. H. Sgt.
Dickinson, H. B. a ‘Sgt.
Maitland, A. G. M. a ‘Sgt.
Roode, C. L. a Sgt.
Stewart, A. M. J. a Sgt.
Yates, L. M.
Crozier, R. R. Cpl.
Ferguson, R. L. Cpl.
Forbes, J. K. Cpl.
Grant, F. P. Cpl.
Price, M. M. Cpl.
Quirmbach, G. R. Cpl.
Watt, A. C. a ‘Cpl.
Byers, F. B. a/Cpl.
Hoy, W. J. a ‘Cpl.
Shotter, D. A. L/Cpl.
Bissell, W. J. L/Cpl.
Earl, D. M. L Cpl.
Gorman, I. L. L/Cpl.
Ker, H. J. L/Cpl.
Martel, G. P. L/Cpl. Ward, M. K. L’Cpl. Whitelaw, A. J.
Cpl.
N.C.0’s
To What Unit
R.C.O.C. (T.C.) .R.C.O.C. (T.C.)
A.F. .R.C.A.F. .C.A. (AF) .C.A. (AF)
R.C.O.C. (T.C.) C.A. (AF) R.C.A.F. C.A. (AF)
C.A. (AF) .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F.
A.F. C.A. (AF) C.A. (AF) D.D. 3
R.C.A.F. .C.M.S.C.
R.C.A.S.C. R.C.A.E.
R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F.
R.C.A.F. R.C.N.V.R.
Date 18-8-41
1-9-41 8-10-41 21-8-41 25-9-41 13-8-41 25-8-41 25-9-41 29-12-41 19-6-41 19-6-41 23-1-41 9-10-41 8-10-41 13-7-41 21-2-41 18-12-41
8-1-41 28-12-41
25-7-41 28-12-41 26-6-41 12-6-41 30-7-41 14-8-41
SERGEANTS’ MESS MEMBERS, PETAWAWA 1940
57
56
31

RIFLEMEN Rank and Name
To What Unit Rfn. Alford, W. F.
.R.C.A.F. Allaert, F.
R.C.N.V.R. Allen, G. A.
.R.C.O.C. Allen, K. W.
D.D. 3 Apostolin, P.
.R.C.N. Baker, V. A.
.R.C.A.F. Beehler, R..
D.D. 3 Bell, J. L. F.
.R.C.A.F. Bellinger, W. E.
.R.C.A. Bennett, G. R.
. 1st L.A.A. Bty. Bennett, L.
.D.D. 3 Benway, A. M.
R.C.A.F. Berry, L.
D.D. 3 Bertrand, J. E.
.D.D. 3 Blair, D. V.
R.C.A.S.C. Boulton, L. T.
C.A. (AF) Brayman, C. A.
R.C.A.F. Brown, H. L.
R.C.A.F. Brown, L. R.
R.C.N.V.R. Brown, W. N.
C.A. (AF) Buell, J. W.
R.C.A.F. Burchill, R. S.
.C.A. (AF) Burchill, W. H..
.C.A. (AF) Burnett, J. J.
.R.C.A.S.C. Burns, G. R.
.R.C.N.V.R. Burt, H. E.
.R.C.A. Carbino, E. S.
.R.C.A. Cardinal, A. F.
.R.C.A.S.C. Carley, P. J.
.R.C.A.F. Carlton, M. R.
.R.C.C.S. Carlyle, J. A.
R.C.A. Casaubon, J. M. J.
R.C.A.F. Casselman, G. F.
R.C.A. Casselman, L. L.
S.D. & G.H. Chant, G. H.
R.C.A.F. Chapman, J. S.
R.C.O.C. Cheetham,
R.C.N.V.R. Cheney, C. R.
.R.C.A.F. Clark, A. S.
R.C.A.F. Clark, W. G.
.R.C.A.F. Clements, A.
.R.C.A.F. Clements, A. E.
R.C.O.C. Clements, H. L.
R.C.A.F. Connell, M. W.
R.C.O.C. Cookney, C. E. J.
R.C.O.C. Cooper, J. H.
C.A. (AF) Cooper, J. L.
R.C.A.
Date 8-7-41
4-8-41 29-11-41 28-8-41 23-5-41 23-9-41 4-12-41 12-3-41 9-12-41 21-11-41
4-12-41 18-2-41 30-7-41 4-12-41 7-11-41
3-6-41 13-3.41 6-8-41
4-3-41 27-2-41 25-8-41 13-7-41 13-7-41 23-10-41 30-5-41 14-8-41 19-12-41 22-10-41 15-10-41 19-12-41
4-11-41 21-4-41
6-3-41 10-12-41 14-7-41
7-6-41 20-6-41 16-4-41
8-1-41 28-7-41
2-9-41 12-5-41 17-2-41 7.9.41 4.-3.41 10-6-41 19-2-41
Cordier Cougler, E. G. Coville, A. B. Coville, E. W. Coville, H. I. Covington, G. W. Cowan, D. D. Cowie, G. K. Crabtree, A. H. Crawley, A. J. Croft, J. E. Cummings, A. Curry, C. W. Dallyn, J. B. Davison, H. H. Deane, W. H.. DeVille, L. Donovan, F. F. Downing, J. E. Dunleavy, W. A. Duvall, M. S. Easter, K. R. Edgley, R. G. Edwards, L. J. Egan, A. A. Ellis, S. A. Fader, J. A. Foley, L. D. Fraser, J. A. Frieday, N. C. Frye, D. H. H. Galway, L. A. Geneau, L. A. Gibson, L. Giffin, J. K. Gifford, R. D. Gillespie, G. R. Gilligan, J. A. Graham, R. F. Graham, R. T. Griffin, A. L. Hagerty, D. A. Halka, P. J. Halladay, G. L. Halladay, R. S. Harkness, R. G. Harper, A. Harper, H. L. Harper, H. R.
C.A. (AF) R.C.A.S.C. R.C.A.S.O. R.C.A. R.C.A.S.C. D.D. 3 C.A. (AF) R.C.A.F. R.C.O.C. R.C.A.E. C.A. (AF) RC.O.C.
R.C.A.S.C. .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F. .A.F. .R.C.O.C.
D.D. 3 R.C.A. R.C.A.F. C.A. (AF) R.C.A.S.C. R.C.A.S.C. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.E. .C.A. (AF) R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. C.A. (AF) D.D. 3 R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. R.C.N.V.R. R.C.O.C. R.C.A.F. R.C.N.V.R. D.D. 3 R.C.A.E. R.C.A. R.C.A.S.C. D.D. 3 R.C.O.C. R.C.A.F. C.A. (AF) R.C.A.F. R.C.N.V.R. C.A. (AF) R.C.A.S.C. R.C.A.
13-8-41 14-10-41 12-11-41
20-6-41 12-12-41 31-10-41
1-5-41 4-6-41 1-11-41 14-3-41 19-7-41 10-12-41
19-5-41 17-2-41 26-8-41
8-10-41 16-10-41 28-8-41 3-10-41 15-9-41 25-3-41 17-11-41 28-8-41 25-8-41 31-8-41 24-10-41
3-12-41 28-8-41
8-2-41 4-12-41 27-8-41 19-6-41 15-1-41 9-12-41 8-10-41 23-1-41 4-12-41 15-5-41 22-8-41 1-12-41 31-7-41 18-8-41 12-6-41′ 19-5-41 15-1-41 12-1-41 13-8-41 9-12-41 2-5-41
32

| |
Harper, M. H. Haves, H. E. Heasler, W. J. Heeney, H. B. Herbert, P. A. Hewitt, E. R. Hewson, A. I. Hill, W. A. Hodge, A. M. Hodge, J. Hogan, E. G. Howard, A. A. Howard, A. F. Howard, R. A. Hunt, O. T. Hurlburt, G. R. Irving, A. G. Johnston, E. Johnston, G. D. Johnston, W. D. Keeler, D. W. Kenney, L. E… Kerr, W. A. Kingston, G. H. Kirkby, C. E. Kirkby, T. M. Knapp, A. Labelle, J. G. L. Lamarche, R. Larocque, H. E. Larocque, S. P. Lavallie, J. A. Lavigne, H. S. Layfield, W. Leaves, W. H. Leeder, W. F. lefave, W. M. levere, H. L. Lewis, G. A. Lucas, G. C. Lunman, G. R. MacDonald, E. A. MacDonald, L. V. Madden, W. B. Makepeace, R. R. Marcell, C. E. Mavery, E. H. McClure, R. D. Mcllvenna, T. J.
C.A. (AF) R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.M.C. R.C.A. R.C.A.F. R.C.A. R.C.A.F. D.D. 3 C.A. (AF) R.C.A.F. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. C.A. (AF) R.C.A. C.A. (AF) C.H. of O. R.C.O.C.
R.C.A. .R.C.A.
.R.C.A.F. …R.C.E. …R.C.N. ..S.D. & G.H.
.S.D. & G.H. .R.C.A.S.C.
R.C.N. .C.A. (AF)
C.A. (AF) .R.C.C.S. .R.C.A.S.C. .A.F. .C.A. (AF)
C.A. (AF) R.C.N. D.D. 3 R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. R.C.O.C. C.A. (AF) R.C.N. R.C.A.F. A.E. Galt Air School R.C.A.S.C. C.A. (AF) R.C.A.F. C.A.C.
21-2-41 4-12-41
8-1-41 13-7-41
3-3-41 17-5-41 31-8-41 12-3-41 15-6-41 13-10-41 13-7-41 2-10-41 17-9-41 26-11-41
3-6-41 30-7-41 28-7-41 12-11-41
9-12-41 27-8-41 14-3-41 12-3-41 2-8-41
6-5-41 12-11-41 17-3-41 26-6-41 15-9-41 13-8-41
13-8-41 22-12-41 23-10-41
13-8-41 11-5-41
9-7-41 17-S-41 31-7-41 20-2-41 13-7-41 28-10-41
6-8-41
1-6-41 18-3-41 13-8-41 18-2-41 15-12-41 14-7-41 25-8-41
8-2-41
McIntosh, A. J. McIntyre, W. E. McWhinney, Metcalfe, R. H. Montgomery, J. R. Moore, L. E. Moran, L. L. Myers, T. Myles, D. Nicholson, L. E. Neil, R. B. Oliver, T. G. Osgood, W. J. Ostrander, K. D. Patterson, F. S. Pearce, M. H. Percival, R. J. Perrin, R. Pike, A. B. Potter, R. D. Price, R, 1. Price, S. Pritchard, A. Rehberg, W. E. Reynolds, H. E. Rhamey, C. E. Rice, R. W. Ross, T. R. Rossetti, L. Row. E. J. Sabourin, J. W. Saunders, G. A. Saunders, R. P. Saunders, R. R. Saycau, A. D.. Sayeau, H. E. Seymour, W. J. Shaver, W. E. Shearer, J. Sherwood, E. Simpson, W. Smith, C. L. Snowden, V. R. Soper, E. H. Spendlow, W. F. Squibb, A. J. Steacy. J. C. Steacy, J. T. Stevenson, E. A.
R.C.A.S.C. R.C.A.F. C.A. (AF) R.C.A.M.C. R.C.A.M.C. C.A. (AF) C.A. (AF) S.D. & G.H. R.C.A.F. C.A. (AF) C.A. (AF) R.C.O.C. Galt Air School R.C.A.F. C.A. (AF) R.C.O.C. R.C.N.V.R. C.A. (AF) C.A.C. R.C.N.V.R. R.C.A. R.C.A.F. R.C.O.C. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.E. R.C.A. C.A. (AF) C.A. (AF) S.D. & G.H. R.C.A.E. R.C.A.S.C. D.D. 3 3rd Fd. Bey.
C.A. (AF) .R.C.A. .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.E.
D.D. 3 D.D. 3 V.G. of C. 3rd Fd. Bry. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. R.C.N.V.R. V.G. of C. R.C.A. C.A. (AF)
25-7-41 31-5-41 13-8-41
3-3-41 15-10-41
21-8-41 13-8-41 19-6-41 20-2-41 30-7-41
8-2-41 18-8-41 18-2-41 18-9-41 21-2-41
4-3-41 13-8-41 13-8-41 19-11-41
1-4-41 15-4-41 30-1-41 10-12-41 13-10-41 12-3-41 12-9-41 21-2-41
8-2-41 10-12-41
6-4-41 15-11-41
3-12-41 10-9-41 21-8-41 30-8-41 24-6-41 30-7-41
8-6-41 8-10-40 1-11-41 24-2-41 15-9-41 1-10-41 8-11-41 12-9-41 22-6-41 17-6-41 25-5-41
6-3-41
60
33

In March of 1942 H.Q. announced that The Brockville Rifles was to be mobilized for active service effective March 28, 1942 and that recruiting was to commence immediately. Lt. Col. N. L. MacDowell, E.D., commanded the Unit until 10 April, when command was given to Lt. Col. D. E. Lewis, O.B.E., E.D., K.C.
Reserve Army Units were called upon during 1942 to supply Officers, N.C.O.’s and Other Ranks as reinforcements to Active Units. The Brockville Rifles had been ordered to mobilize an Active Service Battalion on 28 March. List of Officers and Other Ranks enlisting in the 1st Battalion and other Units during the year are given below:
.S.D. & G.H.
C.A. (A) Brock. Rif. Brock. Rif. Brock. Rif. Brock. Rif. .R.C.A.F.
V.G.C. 3 D.D. B.R. B.R.
Sgt.
McFadden, G. W.
Moore, S. C. Sgt.
Phelan, J. W..
Poaps, G. A. Sgt.
Purser, S. E.. Sgt.
Snider, E. L. Sgt.
Watt, A. C. a Sgt.
Atkins, G. V. a Sgt.
Fraser, H. V. a ‘Sgt.
McKee, W. G. a Sgt.
Newton, E. M. Cpl.
Coulthart, J. F. Cpl.
Maud, E. G. Cpl.
Toye, H. E. a Cpl.
Ballance, L. W. a Cpl.
Hurlbut, D. A. a Cpl. McKeever, W. B. L’Cpl. Knott, A. E. F. … L. Cpl. MacDonald, R. H… L Cpl. Saunders, A. E. …. L Cpl. Wolthausen, G. M. … a ‘L, Cpl. Levick, L. H.
B.R.
Enlistments in 1942 and subsequent years were as follows:
OFFICERS Lieut-Col. D. E. Lewis, E.D.
B.R.
10-4-42 Major G. R. Johnston, E.D.
B.R.
12-5-42 Captain F. J. Parish
B.R.
24-3.42 Lieut. H. E. Gardiner
30-4-42 Lieut. E. H. Gilmour
.R.C.O.C.
7-4-42 Lieut. J. W. McDougall
R.C.A.M.C.
12-5-42 Lieut. F. K. Goldie
R.C.A.P.C.
2-5-42 P/2 Lt. G. E. Nussey
.R.C.O.C.
7-2-42 P/2 Lt. P. A. Miller
B.R.
22-4-42 P/2. Lt. C. C. Fraser
26-4-42 P/2. Lt. E. M. Billings
B.R.
3-5-42 P/2/Lt. C. J. Ireton
B.R.
3-5-42 P/2 Lt. W. R. Derry
B.R.
10-5-42 P/2 Lt. D. A. Grant
B.R.
10-5-42 P/2 Lt. J. Y. Harcourt
.B.R.
10-5-42 P/2 Lt. J. A. Berry
.B.R.
11-5-42 P/2 Lt. G. W. Goodrich
…B.R.
15-5-42 P/2 Lt. J. M. Purvis
15-5-42 P/2Lt. R. J. DeMille (attached from Q.Y.R.).
.B.R.
15-5-42 P/2/Lt. E. W. C. Jackson
31-8-42
10-2-42 15-7-42
8-4-42 7-4-42 8-4-42 6-4-42 16-9-42 11-1-42 30-12-41 22-4-42
6-4-42 8-4-42
8-4-42 27-7-42 8-4-42
9-4-42 13-5-42
8-4-42
7-4-42 20-11-42
3-7-42 28-5-42
B.R.
B.R.
C.A. (A) .B.R.
B.R.
B.R. .B.R. .B.R. .C.A. (B) T.C. 33 .O.T.C. .C.A. (A)
.B.R.
RIFLEMEN
.B.R.
Rank and Name CSM.
Stotts, J. E. CQMS.
Gamble, W. J. C. Sgt.
Box, E. J. Sgt.
Christie, G. H. Sgt.
Cooke, W. E. Sgt.
Cooper, J. D. Sgt.
Forrester, A. G. Sgt.
Fox, T. M. Sgt.
Glenn, J. F. Sgt.
Mallette, E. R.
N.C.O.’s
To What Unit Brock. Rif. . Brock. Rif. .R.C.A.F.
Brock. Rif. Brock. Rif. .S.D. & G.H.
O.T.C. R.C.A.F. C.A. (A) Brock. Rif.
Rank and Name Rfn.
Aaron, W. Aimer, H. Allen, G. W. Amell, C. B. Amell, T. E. Anderson, G. R. Andress, B. V. Anthony, G. Appleton, G. Arcand, H. Atkins, W. G. G. Ault, D. J. Baker, E. W. Baker, H. Baker, K. Balch, W. E. Baldwin, S. S. Barber, H. K. Barkley, J. E. Barrington, W. G. Barton, G. H. Bass, H. F. Batchelor, S. E.
To What Unit .R.C.O.C. .R.C.O.C.
C.A. (A) .B.R. .B.R. .B.R.
B.R. R.C.A.S.C. B.R. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 C.A. (A) B.R. R.C.O.C.
C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .C.A. (B) T.C. 31
B.R. B.R. R.C.A.F. R.C.A.E. B.R.
D.D. 3 .B.R. .R.C.N.V.R.
Date 6-6-42
3-7-42 24-2-42
7-4-42
7-4-42 29-4-42
7-4-42 2-8-42 20-4-42 15-1-42 17 11-42
7-4-42 9-2-42 15-1-42 15-1-42 1-6-42 7-4-42 6-6-42 28-1-42
13-4-42 16-11-42
7-4-42 19-7-42
Date 14-4-42
6-4-42 11-1-42
6-4-42 8-4-42
8-2-42 31-8-42 22-10-42 27-7-42 20-6-42
34

Beatty, W. J. Bellamy, W. E. Bellinger, C. E. Biglow, H. J. Birrell, A. S. Blair, H. Blanchard, A. Blanchard, H. F. Blanchard, P. C. Blunden, N. A. E. Bondi, C. Borris, E. C. Botham, C. K. Bottan, A. Boulton, L. G. Bowen, A. F. Bowen, G. W. Boyd, E. W. Bradford, G. A. Bradford, J. M. Bradford, L. Brennan, S. T. Broderick, F. K. Brown, R. H. Bruce, W. A. Brydie, J. C. Buckley, J. K. Buker, L. M. Bunce, R. A. Burchill, J. S. Burke, H. P. Butts, E. H. Cameron, B. R. Cameron, W. J. Campeau, E. J. .. Capes, W. Cardiff, G. A. Cardiff, G. M. Carr, G. W. Carson, J. P. Carter, H. K. Carty, M. J. Casaubon, R. N. Chant, D. W. Chaplin, S. C. Cheetham, O. M. Christie, C. W. Claus, J. L. Code, L. A.
L.A.A. Bty. D.D. 3 D.D. 3 Prov. Corps
B.R. .R.C.E.
B.R. .C.A. (B) T.C. 31
C.A. (B) T.C. 31
D.D. 3 .O.T.C.
O.T.C. .R.C.A.F.
B.R.
C.S.T.C. (A) .R.C.A.
R.C.N.V.R.
R.C.O.C. .D.D. 3 .B.R.
C.A. (A) .B.R. …D.D. 3
B.R. B.R. R.C.A.F.
14-3-42
8-4-42 1-11-42
8-1-42 13-4-42
3-3-42 15-1-42 7-3-42 8-1-42
8-1-42 20-10-42
3-3-42 16-11-42
4-2-42 24-2-42 4-5-42
4-2-42 15-1-42 15-1-42 15-1-42 14.3-42
19-3-42 28-1-42 2-3-42 1-7-42
7-4-42 23-3-42 13-4-42
8-1-42 15-1-42 28-1-42 21-8-42 14-7-42 28-1-42
6-4-42 22-6-42 19-1-42 20-8-42
6-7-42 15-9.42
6-4-42 14-3-42
7-4-42 14-3-42
8-4-42 6-4-42 2-3-42
7-4-42 15-1-42
8-4-42 6-6-42 24-4-42
9-2-42
2-6-42 18-6-42 15-1-42 31-3-42 15-1-42
2-3-42 14-3-42 16-11-42
3-5-42 14-3.42 16-8-42
6-6-42 28-5-42
7-3-42 28-5-42 2-10-42 26-5-42
Collier, W. E. Collison, W. D. Commerford, R. W. Connell, W. N. Cooper, G. E. Coughlin, L. P. Courtice, A. R. Covilli, D. J. Coville, H. D. Cowell, R. Covington, C. R. Crawford, D. L. Cromwell, E. J. Cross, P. R. Dalton, L. W. Danby, G. J. Darling, C. … Darling, W. S… Davis, E. W. Davis, L. Dean, A. C. Dewar, R. J. C.. Dillabough, P. M. Dixie, R. L. Donnelly, R. L. Droughan, P. T. J. Easter, W. L. Elliott, D. J. Everetts, E. J. Eyre, G. W. Fairfield, A. J. Fairfield, G. E. Ferguson, A. H. Ferguson, E. G. Ferguson, I. A. Flanigan, E. J. Foan, H. Foley, L. 0. Forbes, M. J. Foster, A. Fournier, W. J. Frizell, F. J. Gagne, R. J. Galbraith, F. L. Gallagher, M. J. Gardiner, G. R. Gardiner, L. J. Gauvreau, C.. Gifford, D. O.
D.D. 3 B.R. Galt Air School
L.A.A. Bty. .B.R. .R.C.N.V.R. .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .R.C.A.S.C.
C.A. (B) T.C. 31
C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F.
D.D. 3 .R.C.O.C. .C.A. (A)
B.R. .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .R.C.N.V.R. .R.C.A.F.
B.R. L.A.A. Bty. R.C.O.C. C.D.C.
B.R.
B.R.
C.A. (B) T.C. 31 B.R. R.C.N.V.R. R.C.N.V.R.
R.C.A.S.C. .R.C.A.F.
R.C.O.C. .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .R.C.O.C.
C.A. (B) T.C. 31 R.C.A.F. C.A. (A) D.D. 3 B.R.
C.A. (A) A.R.C.A.F.
D.D. 3 .C.A. (A) . 1st L.A.A. Bty.
C.A. (A) O.T.C. R.C.A.F.
C.O.C.T.C. (A) R.C.A.S.C. B.R. R.C.A.S.C. B.R. B.R. D.D. 3 C.A. (B) T.C. 31 B.R. R.C.O.C. C.A. (A) D.D. 3 R.C.O.C. .R.C.O.C. .R.C.O.C.
C.A. (A) .B.R. .R.C.A.F. .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 . Can. Forestry Corps .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .R.C.A.F.
20-4-42
9-2-42 26-2-42 14-3-42
9-4-42 25-6-42 24-4-42 11-5-42 17-7-42 5-4-42
6-5-42 18-11-42 18-2-42 11-5-42
8-7-42 14-3-42
6-6-42 3-7-42 7-4-42
3-8-42 20-10-42
6-4-42 14-3-42
8-1-42 23-2-42 15-1-42 8-2-42
G6
67
35

Gilfellen, W. J. Gilroy, H. B. ,, Gill, F. L. Glen, L. G. Grant, J. D. Greene, M. F. Grier, D. B. Griffin, G. H. Griffin, W. H. Groves, H. J. Hagarty, T. A. Haggart, R. S. Haggart, W. G. Hall, A. G. Hamilton, W. J. G. Hare, E. C. Hare, S. W. Harper, C. Harper, L. E. Hartnett, J. J. Heald, C. F. Heaphy, E. E. Hewitt, E. R. Hitsman, E. C. Holmes, A. H. Hone, R. G. Hughes, J. Hutchings, C. M. Hutt, C. H. Hutt, G. R. Hynes, D. C. Ireland, R. Jackson, L. G. Jacques, J. L. James, W. Jenkinson, H. N. Jenkinson, K. I. Johnston, P. B. Johnson, R. P. Johnston, W. S. Kane, C. Keck, W. A. Kehoe, M. J. Kennedy, E. W. Kennedy, J. H. Kinch, C. W. Knowlton, D. C. Lackie, J. A.
….R.C.A. …B.R.
.R.C.A.F. .B.R. . Can. Forestry Corps .R.C.A.F.
L.A.A. Bty. C.A. (A) . Ist L.A.A. Bty.
B.R.
R.C.A.F. .R.C.O.C. .R.C.O.C.
.R.C.O.C. .R.C.A.S.C. . L.A.A. Bty.
.L.A.A. Bty. .R.C.A. .R.C.O.C. .B.R. .B.R. .R.C.N.V.R. .R.C.O.C.
B.R.
R.C.A.S.C. .C.A.(B) T.C. 31
V.G.C. (A) D.D. 3 B.R. B.R. C.D.C. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 R.C.O.C. B.R. R.C.O.C. R.C.A.F. B.R.
D.D. 3 .B.R.
B.R. D.D. 3 B.R. R.C.O.C. .B.R. Youth Trng.
D.D. 3 .R.C.N.V.R.
R.C.A.S.C.
28-1-42 6-4-42
1-4-42 10-4-42 27-1-42 25-8-42 14-1-42 14-3-42 26-2-42
8-4-42 3-8-42 7-1-42 7-1-42 7-1-42 9-2-42 8-1-42
8-1-42 17-12-41 28-9-42
7-4-42 11-5-42 10-3-42 20-8-42
6-4-42 26-1-42 18-2-42 16-2-42 2-10-42 8-6-42
6-4-42 15-11-42
8-1-42 8-4-42 9-4-42 19-3-42 14-4-42 20-4-42 12-8-42
9-4-42 11-5-42 6-6-42
7-4-42 23-2-42
9-4-42 13-4-42
2-3-42 24-2-42 1-5-42
Legary, J. B. S. Leizert, H. A. Leizert, R. S. Lewis, G. W. H. Livingstone, E. A… Livingstone, E. T. Loverin, W. H. Lyon, J. B.
MacDonald, A. MacDonald, H. E. Marin, J. A. Marin, J. E. Marrs, J. J. Marrs, J. J. Marshall, R. S. Massey, W. H. Matthews, H. H. McClure, W. E. McCurrie, W. McDonald, C. C. McFadden, V. W. McKechnie, N. S. McLaughlin, G. L. McLeod, J. M. McReynolds, M. McSorley, C. M. Mercier, C. W. Merkley, W. B. Millar, G. E. Miller, A. H. Milne, H. M. Mitten, E.E. Moffitt, G. J. Montroy, P. S. Moore, M. L. Munro, 1. T. Murphy, L. E. Murray, J. C. Nesbitt, G. S. Nicol, W. Ladd, A. W. Lamoureux, W. A. Lapierre, C. D. Latham, H. E. Latham, S. H. Latimer, J. D. Lavere, H. M. Lawrence, H. B. Leeder, P. A.
C.A. (A) R.C.A.F. Clearing Depot
C.A. (A) .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F.
B.R. R.C.N.V.R. R.C.O.C. C.A. (A) B.R. B.R. D.D. 3
B.R. .C.A. (A)
L.A.A. Bty. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 Ist L.A.A. Bty. B.R. Tech. School C.A. (B) T.C. 33 B.R. R.C.A.F. C.A. (A) R.C.O.C. Clearing Depot L.A.A. Bty. B.R. R.C.A.S.C. B.R. B.R. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. Clearing Depot R.C.N.V.R. R.C.A.F. Clearing Depot B.R. B.R. Clearing Depot L.A.A. Bty. R.C.A.F. B.R. B.R. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. R.C.A.M.C. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 C.A. (A)
6-6-42 15-1-42 6-6-42 6-6-42 8-3-42 6-6-42 13-4-42
2-3-42 21-2-42 24-2-42
7-4-42
7-4-42 18-8-42 18-6-42
4-8-42
6-2-42 18-2-42 19-3-42
7-4-42
1-9-42 20-11-42
20-4-42 22-1-42 3-10-42
7-1-42 14-3-42 9-2-42
7-4-42 15-4-42 14-S-42
8-4-42 16-3-42
6-6-42
6-6-42 21-1-42 29-6-42 14-3-42
8-4-42
7-4-42 14-3-42
5-1-42 14-3-42
9-4-42 18-6-42
6-6-42 14-1-42 16-3-42 18-2-42
2-3-42
AQ
36

Gilfellen, W. J. Gilroy, H. B. ,, Gill, F. L. Glen, L. G. Grant, J. D. Greene, M. F. Grier, D. B. Griffin, G. H. Griffin, W. H. Groves, H. J. Hagarty, T. A. Haggart, R. S. Haggart, W. G. Hall, A. G. Hamilton, W. J. G. Hare, E. C. Hare, S. W. Harper, C. Harper, L. E. Hartnett, J. J. Heald, C. F. Heaphy, E. E. Hewitt, E. R. Hitsman, E. C. Holmes, A. H. Hone, R. G. Hughes, J. Hutchings, C. M. Hutt, C. H. Hutt, G. R. Hynes, D. C. Ireland, R. Jackson, L. G. Jacques, J. L. James, W. Jenkinson, H. N. Jenkinson, K. I. Johnston, P. B. Johnson, R. P. Johnston, W. S. Kane, C. Keck, W. A. Kehoe, M. J. Kennedy, E. W. Kennedy, J. H. Kinch, C. W. Knowlton, D. C. Lackie, J. A.
….R.C.A. …B.R.
.R.C.A.F. .B.R. . Can. Forestry Corps .R.C.A.F.
L.A.A. Bty. C.A. (A) . Ist L.A.A. Bty.
B.R.
R.C.A.F. .R.C.O.C. .R.C.O.C.
.R.C.O.C. .R.C.A.S.C. . L.A.A. Bty.
.L.A.A. Bty. .R.C.A. .R.C.O.C. .B.R. .B.R. .R.C.N.V.R. .R.C.O.C.
B.R.
R.C.A.S.C. .C.A.(B) T.C. 31
V.G.C. (A) D.D. 3 B.R. B.R. C.D.C. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 R.C.O.C. B.R. R.C.O.C. R.C.A.F. B.R.
D.D. 3 .B.R.
B.R. D.D. 3 B.R. R.C.O.C. .B.R. Youth Trng.
D.D. 3 .R.C.N.V.R.
R.C.A.S.C.
28-1-42 6-4-42
1-4-42 10-4-42 27-1-42 25-8-42 14-1-42 14-3-42 26-2-42
8-4-42 3-8-42 7-1-42 7-1-42 7-1-42 9-2-42 8-1-42
8-1-42 17-12-41 28-9-42
7-4-42 11-5-42 10-3-42 20-8-42
6-4-42 26-1-42 18-2-42 16-2-42 2-10-42 8-6-42
6-4-42 15-11-42
8-1-42 8-4-42 9-4-42 19-3-42 14-4-42 20-4-42 12-8-42
9-4-42 11-5-42 6-6-42
7-4-42 23-2-42
9-4-42 13-4-42
2-3-42 24-2-42 1-5-42
Legary, J. B. S. Leizert, H. A. Leizert, R. S. Lewis, G. W. H. Livingstone, E. A… Livingstone, E. T. Loverin, W. H. Lyon, J. B.
MacDonald, A. MacDonald, H. E. Marin, J. A. Marin, J. E. Marrs, J. J. Marrs, J. J. Marshall, R. S. Massey, W. H. Matthews, H. H. McClure, W. E. McCurrie, W. McDonald, C. C. McFadden, V. W. McKechnie, N. S. McLaughlin, G. L. McLeod, J. M. McReynolds, M. McSorley, C. M. Mercier, C. W. Merkley, W. B. Millar, G. E. Miller, A. H. Milne, H. M. Mitten, E.E. Moffitt, G. J. Montroy, P. S. Moore, M. L. Munro, 1. T. Murphy, L. E. Murray, J. C. Nesbitt, G. S. Nicol, W. Ladd, A. W. Lamoureux, W. A. Lapierre, C. D. Latham, H. E. Latham, S. H. Latimer, J. D. Lavere, H. M. Lawrence, H. B. Leeder, P. A.
C.A. (A) R.C.A.F. Clearing Depot
C.A. (A) .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F.
B.R. R.C.N.V.R. R.C.O.C. C.A. (A) B.R. B.R. D.D. 3
B.R. .C.A. (A)
L.A.A. Bty. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 Ist L.A.A. Bty. B.R. Tech. School C.A. (B) T.C. 33 B.R. R.C.A.F. C.A. (A) R.C.O.C. Clearing Depot L.A.A. Bty. B.R. R.C.A.S.C. B.R. B.R. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. Clearing Depot R.C.N.V.R. R.C.A.F. Clearing Depot B.R. B.R. Clearing Depot L.A.A. Bty. R.C.A.F. B.R. B.R. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. R.C.A.M.C. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 C.A. (A)
6-6-42 15-1-42 6-6-42 6-6-42 8-3-42 6-6-42 13-4-42
2-3-42 21-2-42 24-2-42
7-4-42
7-4-42 18-8-42 18-6-42
4-8-42
6-2-42 18-2-42 19-3-42
7-4-42
1-9-42 20-11-42
20-4-42 22-1-42 3-10-42
7-1-42 14-3-42 9-2-42
7-4-42 15-4-42 14-S-42
8-4-42 16-3-42
6-6-42
6-6-42 21-1-42 29-6-42 14-3-42
8-4-42
7-4-42 14-3-42
5-1-42 14-3-42
9-4-42 18-6-42
6-6-42 14-1-42 16-3-42 18-2-42
2-3-42
AQ
37
.R.C.N.V.R.
R.C.A.S.C. .R.C.A.F. R.C.A.F. R.C.N.V.R. C.A. (A)
B.R.
Nixon, R. J. Nute, C. H. O’Connor, M. J. Osborne, L. T. . Osgood, W. J. O’Shaughnessy, D. E. . Pantalone, W. D. … Pearce, R. D. Pelow, G. B. Perrin, J. . Place, J. A.– Place, C. R. Plant, E. W. Pollock, E. H. Pontbriand, G. J. J. P. Powers, R. P. Price, H. L. Purvis, W. G. Quinn, J. L. Quinn, J. W. Raison, J. K. Reid, G. . Reid, G. E. Reid, J. A. L. Reid, J. H. L. Reilly, E. T. … Reynolds, J. S. Rhamey, W. C. Riley, R. B. M. Ritchie, W. G. Roberts, P. C. Roche, G. W. Rodger, L. M. Root, W. E. Rourke, E. J. .. Rourke, R. L. Running, D. Ryan, F. S. Ryder, W. A. Sawyer, F. P. Sayeau J. W.. Sayeau. R. L. Shaver, G. W. Sheldon, R. G. Sherman, L. G. …. Sherwood, G. F. … Simons, V. A. . Sine, B. Skilton, J. E. ..
.C.A. (B) T.C. 31
B.R. B.R.
D.D. 3A .R.C.O.C.
L.A.A. Bty. .C.A. (A)
R.C.A.F.
R.C.O.C. .V.G.C. (A) .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .R.C.A.S.C. .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .R.C.N.V.R.
.B.R. .B.R. .R.C.O.C. .B.R. .R.C.N.V.R.
C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .C.A.C.
B.R. .B.R. .B.R. .B.R. .C.A. (B) T.C. 31
B.R.
R.C.A.F. .C.A. (A) .S.D. & G.H.
R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.S.C.
R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.F.
C.A. (B) T.C. 31
R.C.A.F. .C.A. (A) .L.A.A. Bty. .B.R.
18-2-42
9-4-42 7-4-42 20-5-42 27-1-42 12-1-42 28-5-42 18-5-42
9-4-42 16-1-42
7-1-42 3-7-42 4-12-41 2-3-42 7-4-42
7-4-42 10-6-42 20-4-42 14-3-42 18-2-42
4-2-42 11-7-42
6-4-42 7-4-42 7-4-42 6-5-42 8-1-42
8-4-42 27-4-42 28-1-42 28-1-42
2-7-42 6-6-42 25-3-42 25-1-42 25-1-42
8-3-42 28-1-42
2-8-42 17-2-42
7-4-42 11-4-42 30-3-42 28-1-42 17-4-42 14-1-42 15-5-42 17-3-42
7-4-42
Sloan, J. K. Sly, H. L. Sly, S. H. Smith, A. M. … Smith, D. F……. Smith, J. R. Snyder, R. W. Somerville, V. G. Soper, J. H. Southin, H. T. Speagle, J. V. . Spracklin, V. R. Stewart, C. Stewart, W. Strader, H. F. Stratton, W. R. Summers, F. C. Swan, E. G. Swerdfeger, T. Sword, D. L. J. Thomson, J. D. Thorn, J. F. Thornhill, A. F. Totten, W. E. Towsley, C. E. Turner, H. J. Turner, R. B. Typhair, W. J. Ubdegrove, J. Valcour, J. H. .. VanCamp, T. R. VanDusen, W. A. VanDusen, W. B. . Wagar, O. W. Warren, J. O. Warren, T. H. . Weir, G. Wescombe, J. E. Wetherell, F. N. White, F. P. Whitton, J. A. Williams, P. L. Winters, B. M. Wood, J. H. Woods, J. E. Woodcock, G. A. Worth, C. A. Yeldon, D. F. Young, J.
R.C.O.C. D.D. 3 R.C.N.V.R. C.A. (A) R.C.A.F. R.C.O.C. L.A.A. Bty. R.C.A. C.D.C. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. C.A.C. B.R. R.C.O.C. C.A. (A) B.R. R.C.A.S.C. B.R. R.C.A.F. D.D. 3
R.C.A.F. .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .R.C.O.C. .R.C.A.F.
D.D. 3 .O.T.C.
S.D. & G.H. , C.A. (A)
D.D. 3 C.A. (B) T.C. 33
D.D. 3 .R.C.A.F. .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .B.R.
D.D. 3 .R.C.A.F. .R.C.O.C. .R.C.A.P.C. .C.A. (A)
C.A. (A) C.A. (A)
17-7-42 19-3-42
2-3-42 27-7-42
3-3-42 16-11-42
6-4-42 20-8-42
2-3-42 10-3-42
4-3-42 29-9-42 14-1-42
8-1-42 15-1-42 11-6-42
3-2-42 16-3-42 19-3-42 11-5-42 28-2-42 18-3-42 18-6-42 15-4-42 6-4-42 7-6-42 14-3-42
6-6-42 17-2-42 16-12-41
1-4-42 2-3-42 9-9-42 9-6-42 28-1-42 30-11-42 20-11-42 30-9-42 27-4-42
8-1-42 4-2-42 29-4-42 16-1-42
28-1-42 ’12-12-41
15-5-42 15-7-42 28-5-42 31-7-42
B.R.
R.C.N.V.R.
Clearing Depot 3 .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.S.C. .R.C.O.C. .R.C.A.F. .B.R.
38

a/Sgt.
Martin, C. R. CSM.
McBratney, H. . S/Sgt.
Watkinson, R. J. L/Cpl.
Bell, F. E. a/Sgt.
Coulson, R. F. a Sgt.
Hill, L. S. L’Cpl. Tasker, F. J. H.
C.A. (A) .C.A. (A)
C.A. (A) .R.C.N.V.R.
C.A. (A) C.A. (A) R.C.N.V.R.
9-4-43 16-3-43 17-3-43 11-11-43 18-11-43 15-12-43 9-12-43
Rank and Name a/Cpl. Thompson, G. F.
N.C.O.’s
To What Unit .R.C.N.V.R.”
Date 7-5-44
Rfn.
Rfn.
C.A.
RIFLEMEN Rank and Name
To What Unit Wetherell, W. J.
.R.C.A.F. Forsythe, R. J.
.R.C.A.F. Bennett, O. J.
.R.C.A.F. Thomas, E….
.C.A. (A) Randle, R. M.
R.C.A.F. Magee, R. C.
, C.A. (A) Mcllvenna, R.
C.A. (A) Kay, W. H…
C.A. (A) Charlton, D. E.
.C.A. (A) Cooper, C. A.
.C.A. (A) Johnstone, M. K.
C.A. (A) Miller, G. L.
.C.A. (A) Sheets, V. E.
C.A. (A) Ward, W. J.
C.A. (A) Fournier, C.
C.A. (A) Giffin, E. A.
C.A. (A) Miller, H. R.
C.A. (A) Kennedy, H. J.
C.A. (A) Gardiner, H. D.
C.A. (A) Snider, S. D.
C.A. (A) Foldeak, C. C.
R.C.A.F. Murphy, J. R. C.
R.C.A.F. Fraser, G. A..
C.A. Percy, C.
C.A. Edmunds, J. W.
C.A. Larocque, V. de P. .
C.A. Tracey, C. J.
C.A. McNutt, G. C.
C.A. Barber, F. T.
C.A. Algate, R. E.
C.A. Plumley, C. H.
C.A. Comstock, W. E.
C.A. Coates, W. H.
C.A. Kingstone, R. W.
R.C.A.F. Cannon, E. M. S.
C.A. Foxton, R. C.
C.A. Fawcett, G. R.
R.C.N.V.R. Oxbro, B. A.
C.A.
.C.A.
RIFLEMEN Rank and Name
To What Unit Haynes, O. W.
C.A. Lavierre, P. D.
.R.C.A.F. Henderson, R. E. G..
.R.C.A.F. Cass, C. E.
C.A. Thomson, I. D. C.
R.C.A.F. Dunster, E.
R.C.A.F. Fox, E. E.
– C.A. Gearry, R. F.
.C.A. Dorman, C. T.
.R.C.N.V.R. Jackson, R. J.
.C.A. Glen, M. M.
.R.C.N.V.R. Caddick, C. G.
.R.C.N.V.R. Newell, D. N.
C.A. McDonald, J. R.
.C.A. Marshall, D. M.
C.A. Madden, A. Shepherd, W.
C.A. Claxton, N. Sheridan, W. R.
.R.C.A.F. Coville, C. L.
.R.C.N.V.R. Knight, K. H.
.C.A. Standen, G. A.
.C.A. Kelly, G. A.
.C.A. Empey, N. W. MacDonald, A. G.
.C.A. Ralston, A.
.C.A. Reynolds, L. J.
.C.A. Allan, J. D.
C.A. Chartrand, E. G.
.C.A. Taylor, K. R.
.C.A. Christie, G. H.
C.A. Yorth, E. A. McKay, B. A. Newans, C.
C.A. Caldwell, G.
C.A. Sayeau, G. H.
C.A.
Date 10-8-43 18-8-43 30-8-43 30-8-43 30-9-43 20-9-43 22-9-43 9-10-43
8-7-43 21-9-43 30-7-43
9-7-4 3 15-12-42 14-2-43 15-9-43 15-9-43
15-9-43 15-12-42 19-10-43
1-11-43 28-10-43 18-10-43 1-10-43 4-10-43 10-8-43
6-9-43 21-9-43 26-8-43 26-8-43 26-8-43 20-10-43 18-11-43
27-8-43 16-12-43 14-12-43 25-11-43 22-10-43 20-12-43
Date 22-12-43 16-1-44 16-1-44 27-1-44 4-2-44 8-2-44 6-3-44 28-2-44 26-3-44 2-3-44 4-4-44 3-4-44 18-5-44 1-6-44
1-6-44 31-5-44
7-6-44 18-6-44 15-5-44 11-9-44 12-9-44 18-9-44 21-9-44 22-9-44 28-9-44 22-9-44 28-9-44 22-9-44 10-10-44 22-9-44 1-11-44
1-9-44 6-11-44
6-11-44 27-11-44 21-11-44
C.A.
C.A.
C.A.
15
39

N.C.O.’s Rank and Name
To What Unit Sgt. Cochrane, W. O. L/Sgt. Livingstone, G. L. .. a/Cpl. Lindridge, G, H, .. a’Cpl.
C.A.
C.A. C.A.
Date
4-6-45 22-10-45 16-11-44 21-5-45
C.A.
RIFLEMEN Rank and Name
To What Unit Rfn Casselman, E. L……
C.A. Clark, T. W. …
CA. Hunt, L. J. Mcllvenna, R.F.. Haglett, A.
A. Orr, J. C.
C.A. Lawson, G.
C.A. Marshall, T. L.
C.A. Wilson, R. D.
C.A. Gauthier, A. Hoare, G. W.
C.A. Walker, D. W.
C.A. Alberry, G. C.
C.A. Lemery, D. N.
C.A. Quesnel, T. C.
C.A. Sweet, R. K.
.C.A. Townsend, R. G.
C.A. Godin, M. P.
C.A. Claxton, R. E.
C.A. Mercier, O. A. L.
C.A. Wood, B. R.
C.A. Harris, A. H. Locke, C. A.
C.A.
Date 14-11-44 19-12-44 18-12-44 18-11-44
21-1-45 24-1-45 5-2-45 3-2-45 8-2-45 6-3-45 15-1-45
7-3-45 26-3-45 10-3-45 28-3-45 20-3-45 31-3-45 25-3-45 21-5-45 26-5-45 21-5-45
9-4-45 1-9.45
Many officers, N.C.O.’s and riflemen enlisted for Active Service. At the end of 1943 the nominal roll of officers was as follows: Officer Commanding
Lt. Col. N. L. MacDowell, E.D. Second in Command
Major D. H. Mallory A Adjutant and Weapon Training Officer
T/Lt. M. J. Cochrane Quartermaster
Lt. M. O. P. MacNaughton Paymaster
Capt. G. W. Faulkner Transport Officer
T Lt. A. E. Thompson Signalling Officer
2 /Lt. F. C. Shotter, M.M. Medical Officers
Major D. B. Code Capt. H. E. Preston
Capt. C. M. Bracken Chaplain
Hon. Capt. H. Cousens Support Company
T/Capt. M. L. Douglas T/Capt. J. S. Waddington
P/2 Lt. E. M. Henderson, Jr. “A” Company
T/ Major G. A. Beale
T Lt. G. T. Fulford *”B” Company
Capt. H. S, White T Capt. G. A. Robinson P/2 Lt. E. S. MacMillan
P/2 /Lt. C. E. Babcock “C” Company
T Capt. A. M. Patterson P ‘2/Lt. C. R. Stotts
P/2/Lt. A. C. MacPherson “D” Company
Major (Lt. Col.) R. J. Patterson, M.M. P 2 Lt. S. J. Taylor, No. 16 Pln. P/2 Lt. G. P. McNutt, No. 17 Pln. P’2 Lt. W. J. Poyner, No. 17 Pln. T Lt. O, H. Nickel, No. 18 Pln.
T Lt. J. F. Fraser, No. 18 Pln. Camp and P.S.I.
Major (Lt. Col.) F. C. Curry, V.D.
(m.s.c.) (s.s.)
Major J. E. Mackay, M.C. (m.s-c.) 31st (Inf.) Res. Coy., V.G.C. (Attached)
Major C. M. MacDowell
Capt. G. M. Lyons During 1944 training continued on much the same basis as previously. Recruiting was continued on a very active basis, and resulted in platoons being formed in Delta, Athens, Portland and Westport. The A. &T. Staff was hard pressed to meet their commitments in all localities.
Many recruits from these outside centres were taken into the Regiment. In December a company was recruited in Prescott under the command of Capt. G. M. Lyons. Many of the men had previously served with the P.L.D.G. squadron in Prescott, which was made dormant. Enlistment to the active force continued but on a reduced scale.
For 1943 the training policy of The Brockville Rifles (R.E.) was similar to that of 1942, as it called for 40 days training for other ranks and S5 days for officers. Recruiting continued throughout the year. Additional equipment such as Browning Machine Guns, Boyes Anti-Tank Rifles, etc., was made available. One Bren Gun carrier was received for training purposes. Lt. Col. N. L. MacDowell’s tenure of command which commenced May 1936 was concluded on 15 July, 1943. He was succeeded by T/Capt. M. L. Douglas who was promoted to the rank of lieutenantcolonel.
40

The Regiment took a very active part in the 6th Victory Loan Campaign. Emphasis was placed on sound training and recreational activities for officers, N.C.O.’s and other ranks.
An interesting new syllabus was received from D.H.Q. for the 1945 training, with a large part devoted to range practice. The training period for the major part of the year was on a one-night-a-week basis. It consisted of squad drill, lectures, musketry, instruction in the use of the
miniature indoor range, unit orders, discipline, map reading, and organized sports.
The annual summer camp took place in July at Connaught Ranges. The Cardinal Platoon, which was formerly part of “D” Company was transferred to “C” Company at Prescott.
The Badminton Club of the Regiment which broke up after the beginning of the war re-organized in November.
Effective 20 December, 1945, Lt. Col. M. L. Douglas retired, being succeeded by Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D.
The nominal roll of officers at the end of 1945 was as follows: Lt. Col. M. L. Douglas
Capt. C. E. Babcock Major H. S. White
Capt. H. E. Preston Major M. J. Cochrane
Capt. C. M. Bracken Major C. R. Stotts
Capt. H. Cousens Major G. M. Lyons
Capt. O. H. Nickel Major D. B. Code
Lt. C. J. Hickling Capt. J. S. Waddington
Lt. D. P. Crawley Capt. G. W. Faulkner
G. C. Leeder Capt. M. O. P. MacNaughton
D. L. Swayne Capt. J. C. Dow sett
Lt. E. C. Ackland Capt, A. E. Thompson
Lt. W. B. Leacy Capt. C. Jensen
2/Lt. J. C. Jakes Capt. W. J. Poyner
2 Lt. G. L. Taylor On 22 December, 1945 word was received of the sudden death of our former District Officer Commanding, Brigadier F. Logie Armstrong, O.B.E., at Clearwater, Florida.
On 10 January, 1946, approval was granted for Lt. Col. M. L. Douglas to relinquish command of the 2nd (R) Bn. The Brock ville Rifles and to be retired retaining the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel effective 19 December, 1945. In the same authority, approval was also granted for the promotion to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel of Major Gwynne Redvers Johnston and to command the 2nd (R) Bn. The Brock ville Rifles, effective 20 December, 1945.
OFFICERS – THE BROCKVILLE RIFLES – ANNUAL CHURCH PARADE – 13th JUNE, 1943 BACK ROW-2/Lieut. E. M. Henderson, 2/Eleut. G. E. Babcock, a/Lieut. S. J Taylor, Lieut. A. E. Thompson, Lieut, M. O, P, MacNaughton, 2/Lleut. E. C. Shatter, M.M., FRONT ROW.–Captain A. M. Patterson, Captain H.S. white, Major (Qr. Mr.) R. H. Sheridan, E.D., Major G. A. Deale, Major D. H. Mallory, E.D., Lieut-Col. N. L. MacDowell, E.D..
Major G. R. Johnston, E.D., Major D. B. Code, Captain M. LDouglas, Captain G. A. Robinson, Captain H. Cousers. Lieut. C. R. Stotte, laeut. M. J. Cochrane,
78
79
41

THE BATTALION IN JAMAICA In addition to the commanding officer, Lt. Col. D. E. Lewis, O.B.E., E.D., the following officers are some who served with the Rifles:
Maj. J. E. T. Steadman, 2 i/c, Capt. G. W. Goodrich, adjutant, Maj. I. R. Murray, O.C. H.Q. Coy., Capt. H. E. Gardiner, Q.M., Lt. A. W. Peterson, Signals, Lt. J. L. Coulthart, Transport Officer, Capt. W. H. Remmer, Intelligence Officer, Capt. E. J. Kusey, Medical Officer, Capt. M. A. Murphy, Dental Officer, Capt. G. M. McLeod, Paymaster, Capt. D. B. Keefe, Padre (P), Capt. Leroy, Padre (R.C.), Maj. F. J. Parish, O.C. A. Coy., Capt. W. H. Buell, Lt. R. M. Bowles, Lt. E. W. Kennedy, Capt. G. R. Anderson, Maj. H. W. Cardwell, O.C. B Coy., Lt. N. S. McKechnie, Capt. P. A. Miller, Lt. C. E. Cockerton, Lt. R. H. Roy, Maj. J. M. Purvis, O.C. C. Coy., Capt. D. A. Grant, Lt. G. C. Owens-Jones, Lt. J. P. MacDowell, Lt. G. S. Roy, Lt. L. W. Kingerley, Maj. C. E. Makepeace, O.C. D. Coy., Capt. J. A. Berry, Lt. G. E. Aggett, Lt. R. L. Bruce, Lt. C. C. Farran, Maj. J. B. Boyd, 0.C. Support Coy., Lt. E. L. Snider, Lt. C. Elkins, Capt. F. W. Jackson, Lt. W. J. Brent.
Among the Warrant Officers and N.C.O.s were: R.S.M. C. W. Foan, R.Q.M.S. W. S. C. Gamble, C.S. M. H. B. Scott, C.Q.M.S. N. J. Finigan, C.S.M. L. E. McDermott, C.Q.M.S. G. A. Poaps, C.S.M. J. Stotts, C.Q.M.S. D. Hagerty, C.S. M. G. E. Fairchild, C.Q.M.S. R. Marks, C.S. M. G. E. Fairfield, C.Q.M.S. T. E. Amell, C.S.M. P. M. Markell, C.Q.M.S. C. H. Nute, Sgts. H. B. Gilroy, R. H. MacDonald, H. E. Currie, Duggan, P. Benson, S.Q.M.S. J. P. Herner, Sgts. C. O. Campbell, G. Appleton, W. N. Kean, G. A. Porter, E. M. Newton, G. J. Danby, C. H. Smith, J. C. Lyriotakis, J. W. Sayeau, L ‘Sgt. D. M. Taplin, Sgts. E. T. Reilly, J. E. Robertson, A. J. M. Blanchard, J. D. McInnis, S. Hetherington, L/Sgt. Newell, Sgts. Archibald, K, R. Linnen, H. H. Morton, E. S. Shearer, G. H. Moore, Hutchinson, W. J. Preston, W. J. Fournier, D. B. Lane, H. W. Bourne, Grainger, E. J. Flanigan, G. Maddock, P. A. Kives, W. G. Barrington, D. L. Sword, E. G. Maude, A. A. Worsley, Lamont, A. Solose, Wilcox, A. H. Miller, Sherman, J. L. Jacques, S. S. Baldwin, J. A. Christie, McDonald.
A book entitled “The Brocks”, published while the Battalion was stationed in Jamaica, provides an excellent illustrated record of events. It provides most of the information on Unit activities. The name ‘Blue Mountain’ will remind those who served of a vigorous training exercise which was most successful. Although “D” Day had come and gone before the Battalion left Canada, its purpose in Jamaica was fourfold:
(1) to be ready for operational duty (2) to assist in training local forces (3) to provide the perimeter guard for the Internment Camp (4) to provide Aid to Civil Power
On 22 September, 1944 a training accident at “Aqua Alta Vale” claimed the lives of Rfn. G. N. Holdright and Rfn. F. J. Johnston when a 2 inch mortar bomb exploded in the mortar. Lt. McKechnie, Sgt. Bottan and Rfn. Specula were wounded.
Officers the Brockville Rifles (CA) Jamaica 1944.
Major H. W. Cardwell, Major J. M. Purvis, Major C. E. Makepeace, Major J.F.T. Steadman, Lt-Col. D, , Lewis, Capt. G. W. Goodrich, Capt. E. J. Kusey (Medical Officer), Capt. K. B. Keefe (Chaplain), Capt, G. M. McLeod (Paymaster), Capt W. H. Buell, Capt. 1. R. M. Murray, Lieut. G. J. Roy, Lieut. A. W. Peterson (RCC sigs), Lieut. W. H. Remmer, Lieut, E. W. Kennedy, Lieut. L. W. Kingerley, Lieut. E. L. Snider, Capt. J. A. Berry, Capt. P. A. Miller, Capt. F. W. C. Jackson, Capt, D. A. Grant, 2/Lieut R. M. Bowles. Major F. J. Parish, Capt. H. E., Gardiner, Capt. J. B. Boyd. Lieut. W. J. Brent. 2/Lieut, C. C. Farran, Lieut. W. E, Cooke, Lieut, J.F. Coulthart, Lieut, J.P. MacDowell, Lleut.N. S. McKechnie, Lieut. G. R. Anderson
Lieut, G. E. Aggett, Lleut. R. L. Bruce, Lieut, G. F. C. Owen Jones, Lieut. C. Elkins. 1st Bow Sitting: 1st Row Standing: Snd Row Standing: Last Row Standing:
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42

The 1944 Annual Classification in small arms was completed at Harbour Head and Long Mountain Ranges before the end of 1944. The 1945 classification was commenced 1 March, 1945 and completed quickly and to a high standard by August 1945. Range practices for the 6-pounder platoon were fired from Port Royal at stationary targets on a nearby Cay, and on targets towed by equipment loaned from the Coast Artillery (R.A.). The 3-inch Mortar platoon, having undergone extensive training in Canada, required only recapitulation instruction and a minimum of range practice. While the companies at Up Park Camp in Kingston were occupied with camp duties, range work, platoon and company bivouacs, each Rifles Company was stationed in turn at Moneague for a period of four weeks. After two weeks training on battle drill each company completed exercises “Climb” and “Catchment” under battalion supervision. In addition to the training lessons learned on these exercises all ranks experienced for the first time the effects in the field of tropical days and nights. They learned to endure the noontime heat, infection from poisonous plants and bushes, the wood ticks and grass lice. Fortunately there were no poisonous snakes usually found in tropical countries. The nights they found, for the most part, were pleasantly cool and opinion was unanimous that the brilliant moonlight and glittering stars, including the Southern Cross, were unparalleled in their experience. Similarly novel was the deep blackness of moonless nights lit only by myriad dancing fireflies.
Training culminated during February 1945 in the Annual Inspection by the Commander, North Caribbean Area, Brig. J. Jefferson. The Battalion was concentrated at Up Park Camp where the Inspecting Officer checked on close order drill, gas training, bayonet fighting and battle drill. The inspection was completed in exercise “Brock” when the entire Unit moved embussed to an assembly area north-west of Moneague for an exercise designed to test the standard of training in the field. After a detailed examination the Area Commander reported: “The Battalion is fit to provide drafts for fighting units. Provided certain personnel were replaced and a few weeks were devoted to training with full equipment, the Battalion would be fit for war.”
Exercises including the march to Blue Mountain Peak were arranged to complete the training programme.
of interest is the large masonry cast about 4′ x 6′ of the Regimental crest installed some 5000 feet above Kingston at Newcastle. It was repainted in 1966. Hundreds of British soldiers are buried at Newcastle, the victims of yellow fever.
The Battalion provided instructors to the training wing of The Command School, N.C.A., on various occasions. Three platoons assisted the Cadet Officer Wing at Munro College for a period of one week each. On two occasions the Unit provided a platoon to assist in the “Dallas Castle” exercise for the same programme. Two School Cadet Corps, “Beckford and Smith’ at Spanish Town, and ‘Denthill’ at Linstead, were affiliated with the Battalion. Instruction was given to them each week. During the concentration of Jamaica Cadet Corps at Gibraltar Camp. black buttons on the shoulders of the battledress tunic, a custom dating
Kingston, in August 1945, the Unit provided forty-three instructors for a week. In addition, a platoon demonstration in the “Approach March and Attack’ was given. The Carriers, A TK guns, 3 Mortars and Booby Traps were shown and explained to the Cadets. While the R.A.F. were recruiting local personnel the Battalion provided instructors for basic training who received interesting experience in handling untrained native troops.
The assistance given by the Imperial Forces to the Battalion was impressive. Their Trades Testing Boards qualified signallers, motor and driver mechanics, fitters, cooks, bandsmen, and projectionists.
The Internment Camp Guard required a platoon each day. This duty was monotonous rather than onerous.
Plans for Aid to Civil Power were developed and used on February 15, 1946 during a series of strikes when a “Stand To” was ordered to ensure the continuity of essential services and the protection of life and property.
Facilities for off-duty relaxation were provided by The Maple Leaf Club, originated by a group of resident Canadians who served on a voluntary basis. Canadian menus featured at the Club and its recreational facilities provided memories of pleasant evenings for soldiers from all over Canada who enjoyed them. The management committee included Capt. Keefe, Messrs. Grant, Britten, Nesbitt, Mesdames Greaves, Williams, Torrey, Britten, Grant, and the commanding officer, Lt. Col. D. E. Lewis. A U.S.O. headed by popular Roy Lawrence extended splendid facilities for entertainment and relaxation to Canadians, and American G.Is alike. Troupe shows, dances, movies, and good food made this club a favourite resort. The Brocks Band and Orchestra were greatly appreciated wherever they went, and provided an extra measure of good public relations for the Battalion.
Spiritual needs of soldiers far from home were not overlooked. Padre Keefe at the Garrison Church, and Padre Leroy at The Chapel of the Sacred Heart, conducted services regularly in these beautiful and historic buildings and elsewhere as required. Rabbi Silverman welcomed those of the Jewish faith at the Duke Street Synagogue.
For those on leave, a holiday in the Tropical Isle’ was always a pleasure. Many have returned since the War (at much greater expense) to enjoy its beauty.
When the Battalion returned to Brockville in 1946 to be demobilized it paraded through the city in battle order providing a never-to-be-forgotten sight for those thousands of people who lined the route. A reception and dance was held for the Battalion at the Armoury.
During four years of mobilization a total of 101 officers and 1867 other ranks served with the Unit. The Unit opened and closed its headquarters at 14 stations and travelled 16,400 miles.
Men from all parts of Canada served in the Battalion. They carry with them as memories many of the events described in their history. They remember others with mixed emotions such as the red clay at Long
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Lt. R. M. MacDonald Lt. C. R. MacLellan Maj. D. H. McDonald Lt. B. Y. McLeod
Lt. A. H. Thurlow Lt. N. H. Whiston Capt. W. H. Wilson Lt. D. H. Wood
Beach, the sand at Wainwright, digging water mains at Sydney, boat trips on the ferry “Haida” from Ucluelet to Port Alberni, the Ski School organized by Lt. Lorne Ballance, who was wounded while on loan to the British Army in Europe, the names and faces of friends who fell on active service. They may wish they were still receiving their mail from
W. C. “Wild Bill” Price, or could avail themselves of the services of “Barber” Boudreau, or have “Tailor” Eddie Rose adjust for that expanding waistline.
It is expected that many of the “Brocks” will visit Brockville for the celebrations of the Centennial of the Regiment in the fall of 1966.
SOME DECORATIONS WON BY PERSONNEL OF THE
REGIMENT IN WORLD WAR II THE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
Lt. Col. C. V. W. Vickers THE MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Col. C. S. Maclaren THE ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE
Brig. T. E. D’O. Snow
Lt. Col. D. E. Lewis MEMBER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE
Major J. P. MacNaughton
R.S.M. O. E. Charlton THE MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt, E. W. Baker
THE FIRST BATTALION BROCKVILLE RIFLES CA (AF) Nominal Roll of Officers who served at Some Period
April 1942 – March 1946 Lt. O. S. Anderson
Capt. H. E. Gardiner Maj. R. E. Baker
Lt. R. G. Gardner Capt. J. A. Berry
Lt. J.S. Hall Lt. L. W. Ballance
Lt. C. F. Heald Lt. E. M. Billings
Lt. G. M. Hodge Capt. R. Casson
Lt. J. Y. Harcourt Lt. J. M. Carroll
Lt. C. J. Ireton Lt. C. E. Cockerton
Maj. G. R. Johnston, E.D. Lt. J. D. Cooper
Maj. C. E. Makepeace Lt. W. E. Cooke
Lt. P. duG. Makepeace Lt. M. Cummings
Lt. F. T. McAuley Capt. G. D. Dunsford
Lt. G. W. McFadden Lt. P. J. Demille
Lt. W. H. Olsen Lt. W. R. Derry
Maj. F. J. Parish Lt. J. R. Dowell
Capt. J. M. Porritt Maj. L. H. Fraser
Lt. W. A. Sherwood Capt. L. H. Fox
Lt. S. Vessey Lt. C. C. Fraser
Capt. M. Yates Attached H. Capt. R. Burgess
Lt. J. J. Marks Lt. J. E. Charette
Lt. P. Mercier Lt. J. A. Craig
Lt. V. J. O’Brien Lt. G. R. Creelman
Lt. F. A. Peace Capt. W. P. Dey
Lt. R. G. Peddie Lt. W. L. Datton
Lt. D. E. Prentice Lt. W. O. Findlay
Lt. C. J. Rosen Lt. W. Grace
Lt. R. H. Roy Lt. H. A. Junck
Lt. W. J. Ryan Capt. J. L. Kinsman
A/Capt. B. Smith Lt. J. A. Lavallee
Lt. J. R. Surtees Lt. A. C. Lelacheur
Lt. T. Swan
ROLL OF HONOR The following is a list of some of the men from Brockville and district who were killed or died on active service with all arms of the services during World War II. Many of them served in the Regiment, or in its affiliated cadet corps, No. 113 Cadet Corps, of the Brockville Collegiate Institute and Vocational School.
Anderson, Jacob Apostolon, Archie Baker, Ernest William Barbour, Robt. John Carson Beaton, Bill Gerald Blair, Donald Vincent Box, Herbert E. Bradford, Delbert Burchell, Orville H. Campbell, William Alvin Carroll, John Mallory Casselman, John Halifax Casselman, Ronnie Charles Clark, Arthur Raymond Clarke, Archie C. Cox, Jack Scott Crowley, Francis J.
Hillis, Kenneth Milliard Hone, George W. Horton, Ronald Elmer Hunter, Edward Joseph Johnson, Wallace Hayden Kennedy, Henry John Laroque, Sidney P. Legary, James Bernard Lennox, George Everett Lord, James Arthur Maddin, Bernard Devine Major, Thomas Ernest Marrs, James John Miller, Robert H. Milligan, George Douglas Mott, Joseph Moulton, Robert Benjamin
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Crowley, Paul Anthony
McIlvenna, William John Dallyn, James Bowstead
O’Grady, J. Leonard Deltor, Perry B.
O’Neil, Alton James Dietschweiler, Charles H.
Pearson, Bruce Dillen, Stewart C.
Poole, Norman R. Donovan, Joseph Harold
Renwick, Awery Henry Douglas, Hamish lan
Rhamey, William Carmen Elliott, Garnet R.
Running, Donald Fetterley, Albert Edward
Sabourin, Orase Joseph Flannigan, James Edward
Shaw, Charles Hugh Forrester, Richard David
Shearer, John Fowler, Byron Eric
Smead, Stanley Fox, G. S.
Soper, John Herman Frye, Douglas H.
Spurge, Frank Gallagher, Harold
Tarlington, Robt. Daniel Gibson, Clarence A.
Tierney, Thomas Bernard Giffin, Thomas Glen
Tvo, Ernest Glen, John F.
Vandusen, W. Ralph Gould, Innis Lindsay E.
Warren, Arthur Louis Grant, Frank E.
Warriner, Charles Byron Grant, Malcolm Seafield
Whitmarsh, Joseph William Groves, J. Harold
Winford, Norbett Sherritt Hall, James Samuel
Woodburn, James D. Hall, John Robert
Yates, Leslie M. Halpin, Maurice F.
Yeldon, Willis T. Henderson, Donald McCrimmon
Yerdon, Harold Robt. Joseph — Their Names Sball Live For Ever —
back to 1808 when, after the historic rearguard action at Corunna in the Peninsular War, the men blackened their buttons in mourning for their beloved leader, Sir John Moore. In this case the mourning was for a regiment, but it was to be of shorter duration than anyone could have guessed. The old alliance with 2nd Green Jackets, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps, was officially authorized to continue and the regimental crest with its Maltese Cross, and World War I battle honors, continued to occupy a place of honor in the armory.
The ability of all ranks to adjust to the change of Corps and role was soon evident. There are officers and N.C.O.s in the Regiment to-day who made this adjustment, and two more major ones in the following thirteen years.
A Militia regiment is in many respects a reflection of the ability, leadership, and enthusiasm of the commanding officer. Lt. Col. Johnston
wisely decided that if we were to be gunners “we would be gunners”. This officer began his military career as a signaller in 1917 with the Cobourg heavy battery and served overseas with the gunners in World
War I. He brought to his command twenty-eight years of military service in war and peace. Under his direction the Regiment adapted to the A.A. role and embraced the gunner traditions with great pride and enthusiasm.
In 1947 Hon. Brooke Claxton, Minister of National Defence, was the guest of honor at an Officers’ Mess Dinner.
The officers were required to take conversion courses at the armory and at R.C.S.A. (A.A.) Picton. Senior N.C.O.s learned how to be troop and battery sergeants-major while junior N.C.O.s and riflemen learned to become gun numbers on the 40 MM Bofors guns, with which the Regiment was well supplied. Summer camps were held at Picton and firing practice at Point Petre. The gunners of the 60th became so accurate that a number of hits were scored on the target drogue, a sleeve-like object towed behind an R.C.A.F. aircraft. At least on one occasion a near miss on the aircraft itself was observed. Capt. C. R. Thompson, an observer in the aircraft, remembers this clearly. This round probably originated from the gun of another unit firing at the same time.
Readers who served with the 60th in those days will recall the long convoys of guns and vehicles from Brockville to Picton. They will recall those long waits at Glenora Ferry on busy weekends. They may still feel the chill of fall weekends on the firing point, or see that ship which always came out of the fog into the target area just as the first fire order began. Perhaps they will remember the shadows beginning to lengthen on a Sunday afternoon with one more Bofors left to be cleaned before starting for home. On the brighter side were summer camps with time for fishing, golf, parties and the unauthorized trip to Picton for Chinese food with R.S.M. Bill Webb acting as interpreter. Then the last day in camp when the Q.M. seized your bedding before dawn to make sure there were no shortages before the unit was cleared. We now call them “the good old days.”
THE POST WORLD WAR II ERA
On 20 December 1945 Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D., was appointed commanding officer of The Brockville Rifles succeeding Lt. Col. M. L. Douglas. Four months later on 1 April 1946 in the reorganization of the Militia the Brockville Rifles was one of several famous infantry and rifle battalions to be converted, and to join the artillery in an A.A. role. The new designation was 60th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Brockville Rifles) Royal Canadian Artillery. At the same time the Regiment was brigaded with a number of other Militia artillery units in the area under 2 A.G.R.A. with headquarters in Ottawa. Soon after Brig. J. A. Gillies, O.B.E., E.D., became the A.G.R.A. commander.
During World War II it was not uncommon for artillery units to be converted to infantry. This new peacetime situation in which an infantry regiment with many years of infantry tradition behind it found itself, required considerable adjustment in the thinking of present and former serving officers and men. Two factors, one official and one very unofficial, helped to soften the blow. The first, and most important, was the retention of “Brockville Rifles” in the new and official unit title, and the second was the decision at the local level to continue to wear the
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“Dynamite” Dunn of the 60th L.A.A. Regt. (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A. moves in for the kill on Fight Night at the Brockville Armouries.
A 40mm Gun Crew in action at Picton Summer Camp.
L.A.A. training continued after the appointment of Lt. Col. C. V. W. Vickers, D.S.O., E.D., as commanding officer on 1 October 1948 following the retirement of Lt. Col. Johnston. Col. Vickers was awarded the D.S.O. for his bravery in Italy during World War II while serving with the Royal Canadian Dragoons. In that year 180 Battery was transferred from Prescott to Brockville. R.H.Q. and 179 Battery remained in Brockville, and 181 Battery, with H troop at Merrickville, was located at Kemptville. With the Regiment well established in its new role Col. Vickers concentrated on building up its strength. To aid recruiting and stimulate interest he introduced motorcycle training, and visits to other units. A friendly connection was established with D Company, 108 Infantry, New York National Guard at Ogdensburg, N.Y.
Like his predecessor he was interested in building and maintaining a first class regimental band. New instruments and new artillery dress uniforms were purchased for the band, and it was authorized in 1948 as the regimental band following a periol of uncertain status from the reorganization of 1946.
Considerable emphasis was placed at this time on sports and social activities. Boxing matches featuring the best fighters in the services were held in the armory before capacity audiences. The Regiment was represented among the contestants. The Artillery Ball had its local beginning at this time. Regimental dances, and dinners in the officers’ and sergeants’ messes were held from time to time. The friendship with officers of the R.C.R., while that Regiment was stationed in Brockville, was continued with frequent exchanges of social visits, during the command of Lt. Col. Johnston and Lt. Col. Vickers, Lt. Col. J. M. Houghton commanded the R.C.R. at this time.
A number of excellent marksmen in the Regiment were encouraged to enter competitions and won numerous awards and cash prizes in both indoor and outdoor matches. Capt. H. McBratney, an excellent marksman and instructor, was a source of inspiration to the contestants.
On 11 April 1949 R.S.M. (WOI) Arch F. Miller, a veteran of World War I, retired and was succeeded in that appointment by R.S.M. (WOI) W. F. Webb a veteran of the fighting for Hong Kong during World War II.
On 4 June 1949 Lt. Col. (His Honor) D. E. Lewis, O.B.E., E.D., Q.C., was appointed honorary lieutenant-colonel of the Regiment. Col. Lewis had commanded the 1st Battalion Brockville Rifles during World War II, and was a veteran of World War I.
At about this time Maj. Gen. H. O. N. Brownfield, C.B.E., M.C., C.D., Honorary Colonel Commandant of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, who resided in Brockville, was elected an honorary life member of the officers’ mess. This gentleman was a frequent visitor to the Regiment and took a keen interest in its welfare until his death. Honorary life membership was also granted to Mr. George T. Fulford, E.D., a former honorary lieutenant-colonel.
The Regiment lost the services of two regular soldiers who had rendered valuable service and advice for a period of about four years when Master Gunner B.Q.M.S. W. C. Swain was posted to Valcartier in 1950, and Capt. R. B. Mallory was posted to Camp Borden a year later,
On 11 November 1950 the new sergeants’ mess was officially opened to occupy the area formerly designated as the caretaker’s quarters. The new mess was opened as a memorial to those former members who gave their lives in World War II. A memorial plaque bearing the names of C. F. Heald, G. W. Hone, E. W. Baker, M.M., W. G. McKee and J. M. Storey was unveiled during the ceremony. Most of the renovation and financing was contributed by the mess members.
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Lt. Col. D, E. Lewis, O.B.E., E.D. H/Lt. Col. G. T. Fulford, E.D.
Winners of the Lewis Trophy for Best Gun Crew. A fire power demonstration by the regular army and militia was held at Cobourg on 30 March 1952 with the Regiment being selected to provide a Bofors gun and crew, and to demonstrate the fire power of that weapon. The demonstration was witnessed by over five thousand spectators who loudly cheered when rounds from the 60th gun hit their target floating off shore on Lake Ontario.
In 1950 a number of members of the Regiment enlisted for service in Korea with the 25th Canadian Infantry Brigade Group.
On 27 June 1951 Lt. Col. Vickers was succeeded in command by his second-in-command, Lt. Col. C. S. Maclaren, M.C., E.D., a veteran of World War II who was awarded his MC, while serving with the Black Watch R.H.C. in North-West Europe.
Col. Maclaren organized a vigorous training programme which included Corps training, small arms training, signals training, driving, and team sports. To stimulate recruiting he introduced a system of cash awards to members of the Regiment up to the rank of Sergeant who recruited and retained new men. He also established awards to individuals for efficiency and dress,
A trophy for inter-battery gun drill competition was presented by Lt. Col. Lewis, and was instrumental in developing a high standard of efficiency through keen competition for its possession.
In 1951 in accordance with Canada’s undertakings with respect to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization the 27th Canadian Infantry Brigade Group was raised and dispatched to Europe. Several members of the Regiment enlisted for service with E Company of the First Infantry Battalion including Lt. H. B. Lind, Sgt. D. Blair, Pte. Howard Mallette and Pte. O. R. Shipman.
On 6 February 1952 the Regiment mourned the passing of King George VI, Captain General of The Royal Canadian Artillery.
In November 1952 the first C.W.A.C. personnel were recruited for clerical duties with the Regiment. They included Ptes. June Tremain, Florence Wilkinson, Margaret Knott and Evelyn Turmann.

In April 1953 the Regiment was visited by Col. G. W. White of the K.R.R.C. He was presented with an engraved silver cigarette box for delivery to the Regimental Depot in England in honor of the occasion.
The Regiment was represented at the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II by Bdr. H. M. Gaffney in June 1953. Coronation Medals were awarded to Maj. J. D. Seaton, second-in-command of the Regiment, to B.S.M. (WOII) E. J. Burns, B.S.M. (WOII) S. J. Elliott and Bdr. W. A. Sinclair.
The A.G.R.A. was disbanded and the Regiment became part of 13 Militia Group with headquarters at Port Hope, Ontario. Brig. L. N. Carr was the Group Commander.
On 1 September 1954 as a result of The Curry Report on the Militia the Regiment was redesignated as 4 Locating Battery (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A. 181 Bty. R.C.A. Kemptville including H Troop at Merrick ville was disbanded. The brigading with 13 Militia Group continued. The order was subsequently amended retroactive to 1 September 1954 changing the number to “32” to incorporate the 32nd Anti-Tank Battery (SelfPropelled) R.C.A., as well as the Brockville Rifles. The historical summary of The Brockville Rifles issued by Historical Section, Army Headquarters, contains the following sketch history of 32nd Anti-Tank Battery (Self-Propelled) R.C.A. “The battery originated on 14 Nov. 185 S when the “Volunteer Militia Company of Foot Artillery of Kingston” was authorized. It was redesignated: “Volunteer Militia Field Battery of Artillery of Kingston” 29 May 1856; “No. 5 ‘Kingston’ Field Battery”, 1 July 1894; “Sth ‘Kingston’ Field Battery”, 28 Dec. 1895; “Sth Kingston Battery, C.F.A.”, 9 May 1905; “32nd (Kingston) Battery, C.F.A.”, 2 Feb. 1920; “32nd (Kingston) Field Battery, CA”, 1 July 1925; “32nd (Kingston) Field Battery, R.C.A.”, 3 June 1935; “3rd/32nd Field Battery, R.C.A.”, 24 June 1942; converted and redesignated “3rd/32nd AntiAircraft Battery, (Type 2H), R.C.A.”, 15 May 1943; converted and redesignated “3rd/32nd Field Battery, R.C.A.”, 1 Sep. 1943; converted and redesignated “32nd Anti-Tank Battery (Self-Propelled) R.C.A.”, 1 Apr. 1946. The battery was amalgamated with the 60th Light AntiAircraft Regiment (Brockville Rifles) on 1 Sep. 1954.”
Gunner Centennial Parade in 1955. A Guard of Honor inspected by Major General H. O. N. Brownfield, C.B.E., M.C.
32 LOCATING BATTERY
(BROCKVILLE RIFLES) RCA On 31 October 1954 Lt. Col. C. S. Maclaren, M.C., E.D., relinquished command of the Battery. On 1 November 1954 Major W. S. Watson succeeded Lt. Col. Maclaren as commanding officer. Major Watson, an infantry veteran of World War II, had been acting second-in-command of the 60th L.A.A. Regiment during the illness of Major J. D. Seaton, and had served in that Regiment as adjutant and battery commander. Capt. J. D. Cooper was appointed second-in-command and Capt. R. C. Tivy administration officer, B.S.M. S. J. Elliott became the first B.S.M. of the Battery.
It is interesting to note as we celebrate the Centennial of The Brockville Rifles in 1966, that this unit celebrated the Gunner Centennial in 1955 as the unit which perpetuated the Volunteer Militia Company of Foot Artillery of Kingston authorized under M.G.O. dated 14 November 1855, and therefore the fifth oldest unit in the artillery.
A change of Corps was not involved in this reorganization but all the problems of a change of role were added to those of a reduced establishment. Since the only major was the battery commander, no captain could expect promotion until the retirement of his commanding officer. The change in role meant that the former “gunners” of all ranks had to become surveyors. This they did with remarkable success.
By the summer of 1955 there was keen interest in training and the Battery took sixty-six all ranks to The Royal Canadian School of Artillery, Shilo, Manitoba for summer camp. This trip of sixteen hundred miles was made by commercial aircraft. In November 1955 the unit strength was one hundred and thirty-three and by October 1956 it had increased to one hundred and sixty.
The Battery took one hundred and ten to Shilo for training in 1956. This time the R.C.A.F. and the railways shared the transportation responsibilities. Two representatives of the local radio station including Mr. J. R. Radford, accompanied the Battery. The brass and trumpet bands attended and added greatly to the success of the camp.
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Personnel of 32 Locating Battery (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A, at Summer Camp, R.C.S.A. Shilo Manitoba 1956.
a A O A A A A A A
The Eighth successive Student Militia Course, commanded by Capt. J. W. McCulloch, C.D., 1964
Members of the 32nd Locating Battery prepare to board an R.C.A.F. “Boxcar” Aircraft at Malton Airport, Destination Shilo, Manitoba.
During the fall of 1955 the Battery carried out weekend training at Connaught Ranges near Ottawa, and the R.C.E.M.E. School at Barriefield. The officers took part in a field training exercise at Kingston.
During 1956 a special effort was made to interest high school students in survey training. A ten day course was organized during the Easter vacation period with twenty candidates completing the course. Due to the success of this course special arrangements were made to hold an eight week course during the July and August vacation period. Fifty candidates took the course which included a week at Shilo during the Battery’s summer camp. Most of these young men continued to train with the Battery in the fall. A great deal of credit for these courses belongs to Capt. J. W. McCulloch, C.D., a high school teacher, and until recently an officer in the Rifles. Two other officers Maj. D. J. Woodside, C.D., and Maj. J. D. R. Stewart, C.D., assisted on these courses.
The Battery established an enviable record in the Militia. It trained more tradesmen in survey, signals, and driving than any other Militia unit at that time. Its strength exceeded that of many Militia regiments of every Corps.
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Under Major Cooper’s command the Battery continued to grow in strength and efficiency. In 1957 and 1958 the Battery attended camp at Shilo. Maj. Cooper represented the Battery at the unveiling of the Artillery Memorial in Ottawa on 21 September 1959 which was attended by the commanders of all artillery units in the Canadian Army. Successes in Militia Group competitions were repeated and all ranks improved their individual training standards within a highly operational training atmosphere. Major Cooper appointed B.S.M. E. J. Burns to succeed B.S.M. S. J. Elliott. These two warrant officers have many years of service behind them. They are still serving in 1966 and their contribution to the Regiment over the years has been significant.
On 9 April 1959 the Battery learned with regret of the death in Montreal at the age of 43 of Lt. Col. C. V. W. Vickers, D.S.O., E.D. Majors W. S. Watson and J. D. Cooper acted as pallbearers at his funeral.
It had always been the goal of the Battery to earn the right to return to regimental status. In their efforts to reach this goal Majors Watson and Cooper enjoyed the support of the Area Commander, Brig. Eric Snow, O.B.E., C.D., the Group Commander, Brig. M. E. Clarke, C.D., and the A.A. and Q.M.G. of the Group, Lt. Col. E. H. Warwick, E.D. Col. Warwick, a gunner with locating experience gained in World War II, was a bcoster and adviser in the early and trying days of conversion to locating. It is not necessary to explain the advantages in having the support of the Area Commander and The Group Commander in the pursuit of such a geal. The support of all former commanding officers who directed their efforts along various lines was most helpful.
Major Cooper was advised that effective 1 December 1959 the Battery would become “The Brockville Rifles”, a regiment of the Royal Canadian Infantry Corps. So far as it is known no other Militia unit has accomplished this kind of a change, i.e. to a regiment from a battery.
“….. and perchance in some succeeding age, When men shall read your splendid story, The far flung “UBIQUE” on that page, Will reveal your role of glory.”
The un veiling of the Artillery Memorial Ottawa, 21 September 1957.
THE BROCKVILLE RIFLES R.C.I.C.
NEW REGIMENT – OLD NAME If the re-establishment of a new regiment, with an old and honored name restored, is not unique in recent Militia history it is certainly not general procedure. A locating battery became a rifles regiment. This involved a change of corps and a change of status from a minor to a major unit. When the pleasure and happiness associated with the change of status had diminished slightly the problems associated with the change dawned like “first light.” It is not necessary to remind an interested reader of all of them but certainly changes in uniform, drill, and training will be remembered by those who wrestled with them.
Capt. J. P. MacDowell holds the Regimental Crest for the examination of Capts, S. J. Leslie, R. C. Tivy and Major J. D. Cooper following the announcement that the unit would again be designated “The Brockville Rifles”
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Fortunately National Survival training was in full swing and continued with the new unit for some time. Thus the training problem was In-fimized.
The first commanding officer of the (new) Brockville Rifles was Lt. Col. W. S. Watson who was transferred from the Supplementary Reserve and promoted from major on his appointment on December 1, 1959. Major J. D. Cooper was appointed second-in-command and Capt. E. M. Wells was adjutant. B. S. M. E. J. Burns became Regimental Sergeant-Major and W.O. 1.
The new establishment provided many vacancies for promotion of officers and N.C.O.S. Lt. Col. Watson, Majors Cooper, Tivy, Leslie and Cheffins attended qualifying courses at Camp Borden in the summer of 1960. A number of senior N.C.O.,s were attached to the R.C.R. for field training at Petawawa. Other N.C.O.s and officers attended courses elsewhere. There was no summer camp that year.
Early in 1960 Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D., C.D., was appointed honorary lieutenant-colonel of the Regiment. Lt. Col. Johnston, a native of Brockville, was president of The J. A. Johnston Co. Limited, and a veteran of many years with the active army and militia. He served 28 of these years in The Regiment and was commanding officer from 1945 to 1948. He succeeded Lt. Col. D. E. Lewis, O.B.E., E.D., Q.C., who held the appointment since 1950. He served overseas with the 3rd Heavy and 12th Siege Batteries and was discharged as a bombardier in 1918. He joined this Regiment in 1919 and became a lieutenant under Lt. Col. M. W.
MacDowell, M.C., then commanding officer. Lt. Col. Johnston is active in community affairs and a director of several companies.
At a Regimental parade Lt. Col. N. L. MacDowell, E.D., was asked to make the presentation of the E.D. to his son, Capt. J. P. MacDowell. On the same parade Lt. Col. F. C. Curry, V.D., presented a glockenspiel to the Bugle Band.
On May 29th the annual church parade was held at St. John’s United Church with the service conducted by the padre, Capt. (Rev.) M. E. Rowland. Capt. (Rev.) H. A. O’Neill, R.C. padre was in charge of a service for Roman Catholic personnel at St. Francis Xavier Church.
In the summer of 1960 Brig. R. A. T. Eve, K.R.R.C., visited the Regiment, Brig. Eve and Mrs. Eve, the officers and their wives were entertained by Lt. Col. and Mrs. Johnston at their summer home, and at the Country Club.
A farewell parade for Brig. Eric Snow, O.B.E., C.D., Commander Eastern Ontario Area, was held at the Armouries. Rifleman R. J. Burnett presented Brig. Snow with a Stetson hat, the gift of the Regiment, on the occasion of his retirement from the Army. Brig. Snow stated that he could always rely on the Regiment. He added that he always considered the 32nd Locating Battery, at the peak of its efficiency, a model Militia unit and urged those who now serve in the Rifles to maintain that high standard.
Brig. T. E. D’O, Snow pays a farewell visit as Area Commander 1960.
A Student Militia Course was conducted in July for seventy students. The course was under the command of Capt. J. W. McCulloch, C.D., assisted by Capt. J. D. R. Stewart. Instructors included Sgts. Kennedy, and Howe of The Regular Army, and Cpls. Gilroy, Todd, Hurlbut, Brennan and Montgomery of the Regiment. The final parade was inspected by Brig. A. J. B. Bailey, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D., recently appointed Area Commander, who told the graduates that they had paraded like professionals.
The promotion of Captain R. C. Tivy and Captain S. J. Leslie to the rank of major was announced in September.
In July 1960, B.S.M. E. McGurrin, a veteran of 37 years in the Regiment died suddenly. Members of the Regiment formed a guard of honor at his funeral.
Something new was successfully carried out in October when the Regiment conducted a series of four evenings on survival techniques for unit officers, and key civilians who would be involved in survival operations. Representatives of fire and police forces and the Public Utilities Commission attended and demonstrated keen interest in the course. Former officers of the Regiment also attended.
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Annual F. N. Rifle classification was held at Barriefield Ranges on the weekend of October 14th. The Regiment was provided with rations and quarters by R.C.E.M.E. School. Sgt. Lawrence Forrester was the winner of the Col. Buell Trophy for the highest score with a score of 40 out of a possible 54.
In November the Military Band and The Bugle Band appeared for the first time in their Brockville Rifles uniforms.
The Regiment with bands participated in the annual Remembrance Day Service at the War Memorial on 11 November, 1960.
On December 2nd the promotion of Capt. A. W. H. Cheffins to the rank of major was announced.
The final parade of the year was held on December 15th and took the form of a kit inspection and pay parade.
THE BROCKVILLE RIFLES 1961 The first training parade of 1961 was held on January 12th at the armouries. It was announced on this parade that Summer Camp would be held at Barriefield beginning July 9th. Lt. Col. W. S. Watson stated that camp would include infantry training as well as national survival exercises. All units of 13 Militia Group were scheduled to attend this camp. A welcome was extended to S/Sgt. E. S. Hobson, a full-time callout with the Regiment, who returned to duty after a recent illness. Plans were announced for a smoker to be held on January 20th for band personnel and their guests. ‘All “Q” personnel continued to attend courses in Kingston on Wednesday evenings conducted by Regular Army personnel at a ceremony.
At a Regimental parade on 9 March, 1961 Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D., was presented with his commission scroll, as honorary lieutenantcolonel, by the commanding officer. One hundred and forty members of the Regiment paraded and were inspected by Lt. Col. Johnston. The officers paraded in their Brockville Rifles No. 2 Dress for the first time. The Canadian Forces decoration was presented to Maj. R. C. Tivy, Capt. J. D. R. Stewart, S Sgt. Margaret Knott and Cpl. Sam Shields. Commission scrolls were presented to Capt. H. O’Neill, chaplain R.C.; Capt. R. S. Loughrey, medical officer; Lt. Richard Moore, Lt. Brian Kirby and Lt. Robert Paul.
On 23 March, 1961 Lt. Col. Watson received a message of good wishes and congratulations from Maj.-Gen. C. B. Price, Honorary Colonel Commandant, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps, on the return of the Regiment to the infantry. A message expressing the appreciation of all ranks was sent to Maj. Gen. Price by the commanding officer.
The Instructional Staff of Headquarters Eastern Ontario Area informed the commanding officer that the first group from the Brockville Rifles to complete the test, and qualify as trained militiamen on April
10th, was found to be better trainea tnan members of other units in the area. This group included: Riflemen G. J. Donaghue, M. G. Ferguson, B. J. Ford, M. Phelan, A. T. Read, T. A. Sherrer, R. J. Burnett, Cpls. H. G. Bowen, D. E. Merriman, P. C. Maclaren, R. E. Gilroy, R. Kirby, C. R. Leeder, H. F. Todd, I. Cpls. H. R. Campbell, E. R. Chick, J. G. Elliott and Sgts. D. J. Gray and J. M. Hale.
The Bugle Band under Sgt. R. F. Elliott made an impressive appearance on 11 May, 1961 wearing their rifle green uniforms on a march from the Armouries to the Memorial Centre in support of the Trade Fair.
Annual rifle classification was carried out at Barriefield Ranges on the weekend of 14 May, 1961. Many excellent scores were recorded on Saturday and Sunday. On Sunday morning Protestant personnel attended a church service in camp conducted by Maj. J. Nunn, the Area Chaplain. Roman Catholic personnel attended service at Fort Henry Heights. While in the Barriefield area the opportunity was taken to view the site for Summer Camp.
The annual inspection of the Regiment was held at the Armouries on 25 May, 1961 with Brig J. A. B. Bailey, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D., C.D., Commander Eastern Ontario Area, as the inspecting officer. Brig. M. E. Clarke, C.D., Commander 13 Militia Group, was also present. Following the inspection and march past a thrilling national survival demonstration was presented. A mock-up of a partly demolished building was the centre of a demonstration of rescue techniques. Auxiliary lighting was used to demonstrate how the operation could be carried out at night. Capt. H. E. S. Grout commanded a platoon which arrived on the scene and promptly began search and rescue operations in the damaged buildings. Another platoon under Lt. J. B. Kirby began to carry out rescue operations in the surrounding area. A commentary on the progress of operations was given by Major A. W. Cheffins, Commander of “A” Company. In his remarks at the conclusion of the inspection, which was witnessed by over 200 spectators, Brig. Bailey said, “the survival operation was the best I have seen during the past four or five weeks of inspecting units.” “I hope you all think it was worthwhile,” he said. “To me it certainly was”, Brig. Clarke in his remarks praised the unit and pointed out that such a demonstration would give the civilian population a better idea of survival operations. Both officers complimented the bands, and all ranks on their splendid turn-out. Brig. Bailey presented the Canadian Forces Decoration to Capt. R. D. D. MacDowell, and Brig. Clarke presented the Col. Buell Trophy to Cpl. D. E. Merriman, who recorded the best score during the annual rifle classification.
The annual dinner of the Sergeants’ Mess was held on 17 June, 1961. Lt. Col and Mrs. Watson were guests of the Mess on that occasion.
The advance party of the Regiment under Maj. J. D. Cooper left for Barriefield on 7 July, 1961 to prepare for the arrival of the unit at Summer Camp two days later. Their efficiency enabled the unit to begin training without delay. Nine officers and sixty-three other ranks attended
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the camp under canvas near the R.C.E.M.E. School. In spite of almost constant rain the camp was considered a success. The Regiment won the
wireless trophy in competition with other units in 13 Militia Group. They placed second, behind the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, in the rescue competition. An exercise designed to test the ability of the Militia Group to deploy on a national survival operation, and to maintain wireless communication was a feature of the week at camp. During this operation the urt was visited by Brig. Bailey and Brig. Clarke. The fact that they were able to locate the Regimental Headquarters was a tribute to the wireless operators who were able to transmit a clear and accurate map reference. Some other Regiments were denied the privilege of receiving the distinguished visitors, and did not even receive their rations when the communications failed for one reason or another. The trophy winning v eless team consisted of Sgt. J. M. Hale, Cpl. D, E. Merriman, Riflemen * E. Major, F. Pakenham and H. VanRijt. During the camp Lt. Col. 3. R. Johnston, Honorary Lieutenant-Colonel, visited the Regiment.
Colonel A. Mendelsohn, commandant of R.C.E.M.E. School, was the inspecting officer for the graduation parade of the Student Militia Course on 3 August, 1961. Sixty senior high school students completed the course. The five week course enabled each recruit to earn about $200 while receiving military training and qualifying for a St. John Ambulance first aid certificate. Col. Mendelsohn in his remarks to the students, and their approving parents, referred to the drill display as a fine example of teamwork. He added that the training they received would benefit them for the rest of their lives. Col. Mendelsohn presented the award for the best recruit to Rfn. J. W. R. Johnston. Lt. Col. W. S. Watson, and Lt. Col. E. H. Warwick of 13 Militia Group, presented other awards. Capt. J. W. McCulloch, C.D., was in charge of the course, the fifth in an annual series of courses which provided many men and future officers and N.C.O.s for the Regiment. Capt. McCulloch was assisted by Capt. J. D. R. Stewart, C.D., S Sgt. H. E. Byfield of The Regular Army, Sgts. H. Todd and R. Gilroy; Cpls. R. Kirby, R. Burnett, R. Chick, A. Bell-Smith; and Pte. M. McFadden. C.W.A.C.
On 28 September, 1961 it was announced that the Regiment had been chosen as a base for a series of national survival; courses to be held across Canada to train 100,000 men. The first course was scheduled to begin on November 6th with subsequent courses starting the next year on January 8th, February 26th, and April 16th. These courses were offered to men who could meet militia physical standards, and were of special interest to men who were unemployed. Pay was advertised as being s108 a month, plus $65 in allowances for living at home and training five days a week. The course quota for the Regiment was set at 200.
Members of the 1961 Student Militia Course began training on Saturday mornings with the first parade on September 25th. St. John Ambulance certificates earned during the summer were presented on this parade. Saturday morning training met with limited success.
On 16 October, 1961 Brig. Bailey visited Brockville and addressed a meeting of civic leaders under arrangements made by the Regiment. Brig. Bailey explained the role of the army in survival operations, and the arrangements already made for the warning of the population in the event of nuclear’ attack. Brig. Bailey was thanked by Mayor J. W. Langmuir, DF.C.
It was announced on 3 November, 1961 by Maj. J. P. MacDowell, E.D., officer commanding the special militia training programme, that enlistments for the first course beginning November 6th had reached 150. These men were from the ranks of the unemployed, together with seasonal workers in agriculture and personnel on leave of absence from local industry. Among those assisting Maj. MacDowell from the Regiment were Capt. H. McBratney, Lt. C. R. Thompson, R.S.M. E. J. Burns, S/Sgt. J. M. Hale, Sgt. R. F. Elliott and Cpl. H. T. Hamelin. This course was completed and a Graduation Parade was held on 12 December, 1961 with Brig. A. J. B. Bailey reviewing the parade of 115 who completed the course. The parade and survival demonstrations met with the unqualified approval of Brig. Bailey. Members of the Regular Army who contributed greatly to the success of this course were Capt. L. C. MacPhee, S. M. A. R. G. Tugwood, Sgt. C. H. Moorhead, M.M., Sgt. O. J. Green, Sgt. C. Weisenberg, Sgt. G. Knapp, Sgt. B. E. Elliott, and Cpl. J. J. Cameron.
The Remembrance Day parade was one of the best in several years with S. M.T.P. personnel on parade with the Regiment.
Members of this course supplied casualties for a test of the disaster plan for the Brockville General Hospital on December 14th.
The summer of 1961 was a busy time for the Bugle Band with engagements in the U.S. including Tupper Lake, where they placed second in an international band competition, and their appearance at the sunset ceremonial at Fort Henry.
In September Lt. Col. Watson was one of 150 regular and militia commanding officers attending a conference on co-ordination of rescue and survival operations called by the G.O.C., Maj. Gen. H. A. Sparling. In October, the commanding officer presented a chair to the Officers’
Mess at the Royal Canadian School of Infantry, Camp Borden, as a gift from the officers and former commanding officers of the Regiment. The chair includes, in its design, a carved crest of the Regiment.
On December 15th the final parade of the year was held. Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D., inspected the Regiment, and presented the Canadian Forces Decoration to Maj. J. D. Cooper. The dress and deportment of all ranks on this parade suggested that the conversion to a Rifle Battalion had reached an advanced stage. Lt. Col. Johnston and Lt. Col. Warwick complimented all ranks on a most successful year.
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S Sgt. F. A. Pruner S Sgt. M. H. Knott S/Sgt. A. M. Markell Sgt. L. H. Forrester
S Sgt. J. M. Hale S ‘Sgt. H. I. Rothwell Sgt. H. Godby
THE BROCKVILLE RIFLES 1962 National survival courses under the Special Militia Training programme continued in 1962 with the second course beginning in January with 187 men participating. Ten graduates of the first course who received special training at Camp Borden joined the staff as instructors. Lt. Col. W. S. Watson inspected the course on January 27th. This second course was completed on February 16th when Brig. A. J. B. Bailey termed the parade and demonstration the best he had seen in Eastern Ontario.
On February 24th a Mess Dinner was held honouring Lt. Col. Watson on his approaching retirement. He was presented with an engraved silver tray by Capt. S. V. Kell, C. D. on behalf of the officers.
Sgt. Major G. C. Markell was honoured by members of the Sergeants’ Mess on March Sth. This warrant officer at the time of his retirement in December 1961 had completed twenty-five years of service with the Regiment in the band. He had taken an active interest in Mess affairs and served two terms as president. He was made an honourary life member.
The retirement of Lt. Col. Watson and the appointment of Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper was marked on March 16 when over three hundred members of the Regiment paraded for the ceremony including the members of the third Special Militia Training Course. The official date of Lt. Col. Watson’s retirement was 28 February, 1962 with Lt. Col. Cooper’s appointment 1 March, 1962.
The Regiment paraded on April 2nd to participate in ceremonies in front of city hall in connection with the new city status for Brockville. The smart appearance of the Regiment drew many approving comments from the large crowd as they marched past and formed a hollow square for the official ceremonies. Four companies and the band paraded under the command of Lt. Col. J. D, Cooper.
There was a large attendance at the final parade of the third survival course. Following a demonstration which included drill, traffic control, first aid and rescue, Brig. A. J. B. Bailey, D.S.O., O.B.E., C.D., the Area Commander, called the parade and demonstrations both spectacular and sensational. He also had a special word of praise for the Bugle Band under Sgt. R. E. Elliott. The course commander was Maj. J. P. MacDowell, E.D. assisted by Capt. J. D. R. Stewart, C.D., Capt. L. G. MacPhee and Sgt. D. M. Scullion.
Army Headquarters anounced on 10 April, 1962 that Brigadier Thomas Eric D’Oyly Snow, O.B.E., C.D., of Toronto had been appointed Honorary Colonel of The Regiment. Brig. Snow was commander of Eastern Ontario Area on his retirement from the Regular Army in 1961. Brig.
Snow was first appointed to a commission in the St. John Fusiliers (Militia) in 1924. Appointed to The Royal Canadian Regiment in 1926, Brig. Snow commanded that Regiment during the Second World War from July 1941 until February 1943. In 1944 he commanded the 11th Canadian Infantry Brigade. After the war Brig. Snow held a number of command and staff appointments, including the appointment of Deputy AdjutantGeneral, Director-General of Army Personnel, and Commander, New Brunswick Area. In civilian life Brig. Snow is Provincial Commissioner of St. John Ambulance, Ontario Council.
For the first time in many years members of the Regiment received training in, and the opportunity to fire, heavy support weapons including the 30 calibre machine gun at Camp Petawawa. Instruction was also given on the 81 mm. mortar.
The fourth and final Special Militia Training Course began on April 16th. Four hundred and twenty men were trained on previous courses, and eighty-five enlisted for this one. These courses provided many recruits for the Regiment and resulted in a large number of men from Brockville and district receiving training in First Aid and Rescue. Col. A. Mendelsohn was the inspecting officer for the final parade of the final course. Col. Mendelsohn termed the demonstrations spectacular and praised those on parade and their instructors.
Early in May sixty Brockville Collegiate students were selected for the student militia course to begin on July 3rd and continue to August 6th. Capt. J. W. McCulloch and Capt. J. D. R. Stewart assisted by Cpls. R. Kirby, B. Walsh, D. Carr, D. I. Rothwell and W. Montgomery were appointed to conduct the course.
The Cadet Corps of The Brockville Collegiate Institute and Vocational School, which is allied with the Regiment, was inspected in May by the Area Commander, Brig. Bailey.
Annual rifle classification for the Regiment was carried out at Barriefield ranges in May and was highly successful.
The annual inspection of the Regiment was carried out on May 17th by the Area Commander. He was high in his praise of the Regiment and the demonstrations he witnessed. The Bugle Band was again complimented on their high standard of efficiency.
Summer Camp was held at Barriefield in July when the Regiment joined other units of 13 Militia Group for a week of intensive training.
Since the commanding officer, Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper, acted as chief umpire for the whole Militia Group, temporary command of the Regiment was assumed by Maj. R. C. Tivy. One day was spent in a unit national survival exercise, and two days in “Exercise Cry Havoc II” in which all units and personnel participated away from the camp area. Meals were prepared for the Unit by its own staff of cooks including Cpl. Ed. Clark, Rfn. J. Croteau, Rín. E. McDougall and Rfn. P. Burns.
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B Coy.
In camp competitions the unit retained the wireless trophy won the previous year, and captured the pennant for best unit lines. An award for best C.W.A.C. private was won by Pte. K. Lavigne. Visitors to camp included the G.O.C. Maj. Gen. George Kitching, Brig. Eric Snow, and Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston.
During the summer months the Regiment participated in the Flag Lowering Ceremonies on Block House Island.
Lt. Col. W. S. Watson was the inspecting officer for the graduation parade of the student militia course. Lt. Col. Watson and Lt. Col. Cooper complimented the students on their progress and presented awards to outstanding members of the course including Rfn. R. T. D. Hum, best recruit. The Bugle Band participated in the programme and added to its success.
On August 29th the Bugle Band again participated in the closing ceremonies at Fort Henry and gave their usual fine performance before 10,000 spectators.
On November 11th the Regiment supplied a guard for the annual Remembrance Day service at the war memorial. The military and bugle bands participated. The salute, following the service, was taken by Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E. D., honorary lieutenant-colonel of the Regiment.
The final parade of the year was held on December 14, 1962 when Brig. Snow inspected the Regiment.
. Capt. H. B. Lind
Capt. R. D. D. MacDowell, C.D. Lt. C. R. Thompson
2 /Lt. J. J. Power C Coy.
Maj. J. G. Scott, C.D.
Lt. E. J. White
W.O.S AND SR. N.C.O. W.0. I E. J. Burns
S ‘Sgt. W. O. Mott A/W.O. I K. E. Mara
S/Sgt. G. M. St. Lawrence W.O. IL S. J. Elliott
S/Sgt. J. M. Hale W.O. IL R. F. Todd
s ‘Sgt. H. I. Rothwell S ‘Sgt. D. J. Elliott
Sgt. H. T. Bowen S/Sgt. F. A. Pruner
Sgt. L. H. Forrester S/Sgt. M. H. Knott
Sgt. C. R. Leeder S/Sgt. R. F. Elliott
Sgt. D. E. Merriman INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF – STUDENTS MILITIA COURSE
Capt. J. W. McCulloch, C.D. 2/Lt. H. T. Simpson
W.0. II A. E. G. Tugwood Cpl. R. A. Kirby Cpl. W. A. G. Montgomery Cpl. W. D. Carr Cpl. D. I. Rothwell Cpl. B. J. Walsh Cpl. B. T. Brennan INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF – SPECIAL MILITIA
TRAINING PROGRAMME Maj. J. P. MacDowell, E.D. Maj. J. D. R. Stewart, C.D. Capt. H. McBratney, E.D. Lt. C. R. Thompson
W.0. II E. J. Burns S/Sgt. J. M. Hale S/Sgt. R. F. Elliott, C.D.
* Pmr.
NOMINAL ROLL OF OFFICERS AT DECEMBER 31, 1962 C.O.
.Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper, C.D. 2/IC.
Maj. R. C. Tivy, C.D. Adjt.
Capt. H. E. S. Grout Q.M.
. Capt. R. M. Hancock
. Capt. G. M. Hendry, C.D. M.O.
-Capt. J. E. Cooke Chap.
. Maj. M. E. Rowland, C.D. (P) Chap.
.. Capt. H. A. O’Neill (R.C.) P.S.O.
. Maj. D. J. Woodside, C.D. P.R.O.
. Capt. W. E. Row H.Q. Coy.
Capt. E. M. Wells Lt. H. M. Giffin 2/Lt. W. G. Gallagher
2/Lt. J. A. B. Garton A Coy.
Maj. J. D. R. Stewart, C.D. Lt. J. B. Kirby Lt. R. M. Paul 2/Lt. D. J. E. Gray 2 /Lt. D. Mott
THE BROCKVILLE RIFLES 1963 The year 1963 was one of continuing success for The Brockville Rifles.
Five young subalterns including D. G. Ross, D. S. Meuler, J. J. Power, D, Gray, J. B. Garton, W. G. Gallagher and D. Mott began an intensive training programme at the armouries to qualify them as officers. Major Donald Cameron, a former officer of the Regular Army, had joined the Regiment on his retirement and acted as chief instructor for the course.
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He was assisted by R.S.M. E. J. Burns, Lt. C. R. Thompson, and Capt. J. W. McCulloch. Specialized assistance was provided by Lt. Col. W. S. Watson, a former commanding officer, and Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper, the present commanding officer.
On 22 February 1963 it was announced that S/Sgt. Margaret Knott had been promoted to warrant rank, Cpl. Melanie McFadden to sergeant, and L/Cpl. Renee Shaw to corporal. These members of the C.W.A.C. performed valuable clerical duties with the Regiment.
The Regiment mourned the passing early in March of Lt. Col. C. S. Maclaren, M.C., E.D., at Woodstock. Lt. Col. Maclaren was a former commanding officer who enjoyed the respect of all ranks. Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper and Capt. S. V. Kell represented the Regiment at his funeral in Woodstock.
Considerable interest was generated in late March when training on the 3.S rocket launcher was instituted at the armouries followed by firing practice at Perawawa. Sergeant-Major J. Gill of the P.P.C.L.I. who joined the Regiment later following his retirement from the Regular Army acted as instructor on this powerful anti-tank weapon.
The promotion of Capt. D. J. Woodside, C.D., to the rank of major was noted with pleasure by members of the Regiment. Major Woodside had been attached to the Regiment as personnel officer for five years.
On 2 April 1963 it was announced that Rt. Hon. Anthony Eden, P.C., K.G., M.C., Earl of Avon, would be the guest of honor at the Centennial of the Regiment in 1966. The former prime minister of England has a long association with the King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Arrangements for this visit were made with the assistance of Hon. J. A. C. Auld, M.L.A. Leeds, a former officer of the Regiment, and with the aid of Hon. George A. Drew, Q.C., high commissioner for Canada in England. All ranks were delighted to learn that this distinguished statesman and soldier had accepted the invitation.
On 4 April 1963 Maj. Gen. G. Kitching, O.B.E., D.S.O., C.D., headed a distinguished list of military and civic leaders at a dinner in The Officers’ Mess. During the dinner a tribute was paid to Major Donald Cameron on his last day in the Regular Army. General Kitching in his remarks expressed the opinion that a good officer and N.C.O. cadre backed by 250 riflemen would go a long way in ensuring that the Regiment would be mobilized early in any future war.
At the annual inspection in May Brig. J. S. Ross, D.S.O., C.D., stated that it was the finest parade and exhibition of military and survival tactics he had seen since his appointment as Area Commander in September 1962. He announced that Capt. H. B. Lind of the Regiment had received the highest mark among 27 officers who wrote the captain to major examination.
On 4 May 1963 No. 113 Cadet Corps (B.C.L. & V.S.) was inspected by Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper, C.D., a former member of that Corps.
The news of the acceptance of a ministry in Toronto by Major M. E. Rowland, C.D., the Regimental padre (P) was received with regret on 25 June 1963. Major Rowland had served with the Regiment for ten years.
The death of Lt. Col. John Rodney McCullough, V.D., on 24 June 1963 was the cause of grief to members of the Regiment. Lt. Col. McCullough served during World War I with the 15 6th Battalion and was wounded in 1918. He continued his military association after the war as a member of this Regiment which he commanded from 1933 to 1936. Since his retirement from the Regiment he frequently visited the Regi
ment and never lost his interest in it. Seven former commanding officers acted as honorary pallbearers at his funeral.
On 27 June 1963 the Regiment was inspected by the Honorary Lieutenant-Colonel, Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D. The Johnston Trophy for the best company was presented to “H.Q.” and “B” Companies who were considered equal in the competition for best company of the year. The Col. Buell Trophy for best marksman was presented for the second year to Sgt. L. Forrester. Maj. D. J. Woodside, C.D., was presented with a clasp to his C.D. on completion of twenty-two years of service. Lt. Col. Johnston congratulated Lt. Col. Cooper and all ranks on their progress during the year.
Forty young men were selected for the seventh Student Militia Course held during the summer. The staff included Capt. J. W. McCulloch, C.D., Lt. C. R. Thompson, and Sgt. W. H. Munro of Area Headquarters instructional staff. Rfn. T. P. Elliott was named best recruit at the graduation parade. Lt. Col. Cooper was the inspecting officer.
Annual Summer Camp was held at Barriefield from July 7 to 13 for 110 officers and men. The Regiment trained with other units of 13 Militia Group. The unit was commanded in camp by Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper. Lt. Col. W. S. Watson was called out to serve as chief umpire at camp. Maj. A. W. H. Cheffins and R.S.M. E. J. Burns were attached to Militia Group Headquarters.
The camp was highly successful with the Regiment winning four awards including the wireless trophy, won for the third successive year, the best lines pennant, the shield for .22 calibre rifle competition, and the trophy for the rescue competition. During the camp the Regiment took part in a 600 man survival exercise of two day’s duration.
On 24 September 1963 the members of the Sergeants’ Mess were hosts to their opposite numbers in the P.W.O.R. of Kingston at a reception, dinner, and dance in their Mess.
The death of Lt. Col. D. E. Lewis, O.B.E., E.D., Q.C., on September 23rd was another great loss in the year to the Regiment. The former commanding officer of the 1st Battalion Brock ville Rifles and former honorary lieutenant-colonel of the Regiment was a popular officer with a long and distinguished career with the Regiment. His contribution to the Regiment and his never-failing support will always be remembered.
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School Board, and Brockville Branch No. 96 Royal Canadian Legion, expressing the desire of the citizens represented by these bodies that the Regiment continue to function in its present capacity.
The year was not entirely devoted to politics. As already stated, efficiency had to be maintained. In lieu of summer camp, Lt. Col. Cooper and a selected group of twenty officers and N.C.O.s attended a School at Niagara-On-The-Lake from July Sth to July 11th along with their opposite numbers from other units in Central Command. The object of the school was to prepare leaders for the new Militia which was expected to emerge from the report of The Suttie Commission. Many valuable lessons were learned from experts on a variety of military subjects. The forty-six units represented provided the opportunity to exchange information, to make new friends, and to renew old acquaintances.
On 1 September 1964 command of the Regiment passed from Lt. Col. J. D, Cooper, C.D., to his second-in-command, Lt. Col. R. C. Tivy, C.D. Lt. Col. Tivy had served with the Regiment for 13 years, joining as a subaltern in 1951. The retirement of Lt. Col. Cooper, who had also commanded the 32nd Locating Battery (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A., brought to a close a long and distinguished military career for Lt. Col. Cooper, which began with this Regiment in 1938.
One of the features of the training year was “Exercise Frostbite” carried out by sixty officers and men of the Regiment in below zero weather as an overnight tactical manoeuvre. Capt. Hugo Grout was in charge of this very successful exercise.
The famous Bugle Band of the Regiment added further honours to its name, and that of the Regiment, when it won for the second successive year the trophy for best band at the Annual Seaway Festival. Bugle
Major R. F. Elliott, organizer and conductor of the band from its inception, received the award on behalf of the band.
The annual inspection was conducted by Brig. J. S. Ross, D.S.O., C.D., Commander Eastern Ontario Area. Lt. Col. J. E. Saxby represented the Militia Group Commander. Following the ceremonial parade in which the Regiment under Lt. Col. Cooper was reviewed by the Area Commander, the Bugle Band with the Pioneer Section entertained the official party and spectators while the Regiment prepared for demonstrations on the lawn of the armouries. These demonstrations were designed to show the infantry skills being stressed in the Regiment. A great deal of skill was evident in the arrangement of the obstacle course, mortar and machine gun posts, and wireless communications. An assault by “A” Company was made realistic by explosions, battle cries and the groans of the wounded.
At the conclusion of the demonstrations Brig. Ross stated that the inspection was the best he had seen that year. “Your drill and turn out were excellent”, he said “and your demonstrations were well conceived and executed.” “What I have seen to-night, and your past record should influence your future as a Regiment.”
Another Student Militia Course for forty-five young men was held during the summer under Capt. J. W. McCulloch, C.D. Lt. Col. T. E. Duffield, C.D., A.A. and Q.M.G. of 13 Militia Group was the inspecting officer for the graduation parade, and praised the recruits and their instructors.
In February 1964 Capt. S. V. Kell, C.D., of the Regiment was appointed an honorary aide-de-camp to Hon. W. Earl Rowe, lieutenantgovernor of Ontario. This appointment was regarded as an honor to the community and to the Regiment, as well as to the officer appointed. Capt. Kell began his military career in 1939 and served overseas with the R.C.A.S.C. as an N.C.O. He was returned to Canada for officer training and graduated from Gordon Head, B.C. in 1942. In 1949 he joined the 60th L.A.A. Regiment and has continued to serve to the present time.
On 15 May 1964 Col. W. H. Seamark, C.D., Chief of Staff at Central Command was the guest of honor at a dinner in the Officers’ Mess. Col. Seamark joined the Regiment in 1933 at the age of fifteen. A distinguished career in the Regular Army preceded his present appointment.
Lt. Col. R. C. Tivy, the present commanding officer, began his military career at the age of 16 in The Prince of Wales Rangers in 1939. His long service and experience as a soldier and professional engineer provides him with an excellent background for command. He assumes command as the immediate future of the Regiment is assured, a future to which he has already made a large contribution.
On 24 November 1964 Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper, C.D., was honored at a Mess Dinner when he was presented with an engraved silver tray by Lt. Col. R. C. Tivy, C.D., on behalf of the officers of the Regiment. The dinner was attended by serving officers and their wives.
Exercise Frostbite during the winter of 1964.
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School Board, and Brockville Branch No. 96 Royal Canadian Legion, expressing the desire of the citizens represented by these bodies that the Regiment continue to function in its present capacity.
The year was not entirely devoted to politics. As already stated, efficiency had to be maintained. In lieu of summer camp, Lt. Col. Cooper and a selected group of twenty officers and N.C.O.s attended a School at Niagara-On-The-Lake from July Sth to July 11th along with their opposite numbers from other units in Central Command. The object of the school was to prepare leaders for the new Militia which was expected to emerge from the report of The Suttie Commission. Many valuable lessons were learned from experts on a variety of military subjects. The forty-six units represented provided the opportunity to exchange information, to make new friends, and to renew old acquaintances.
On 1 September 1964 command of the Regiment passed from Lt. Col. J. D, Cooper, C.D., to his second-in-command, Lt. Col. R. C. Tivy, C.D. Lt. Col. Tivy had served with the Regiment for 13 years, joining as a subaltern in 1951. The retirement of Lt. Col. Cooper, who had also commanded the 32nd Locating Battery (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A., brought to a close a long and distinguished military career for Lt. Col. Cooper, which began with this Regiment in 1938.
One of the features of the training year was “Exercise Frostbite” carried out by sixty officers and men of the Regiment in below zero weather as an overnight tactical manoeuvre. Capt. Hugo Grout was in charge of this very successful exercise.
The famous Bugle Band of the Regiment added further honours to its name, and that of the Regiment, when it won for the second successive year the trophy for best band at the Annual Seaway Festival. Bugle
Major R. F. Elliott, organizer and conductor of the band from its inception, received the award on behalf of the band.
The annual inspection was conducted by Brig. J. S. Ross, D.S.O., C.D., Commander Eastern Ontario Area. Lt. Col. J. E. Saxby represented the Militia Group Commander. Following the ceremonial parade in which the Regiment under Lt. Col. Cooper was reviewed by the Area Commander, the Bugle Band with the Pioneer Section entertained the official party and spectators while the Regiment prepared for demonstrations on the lawn of the armouries. These demonstrations were designed to show the infantry skills being stressed in the Regiment. A great deal of skill was evident in the arrangement of the obstacle course, mortar and machine gun posts, and wireless communications. An assault by “A” Company was made realistic by explosions, battle cries and the groans of the wounded.
At the conclusion of the demonstrations Brig. Ross stated that the inspection was the best he had seen that year. “Your drill and turn out were excellent”, he said “and your demonstrations were well conceived and executed.” “What I have seen to-night, and your past record should influence your future as a Regiment.”
Another Student Militia Course for forty-five young men was held during the summer under Capt. J. W. McCulloch, C.D. Lt. Col. T. E. Duffield, C.D., A.A. and Q.M.G. of 13 Militia Group was the inspecting officer for the graduation parade, and praised the recruits and their instructors.
In February 1964 Capt. S. V. Kell, C.D., of the Regiment was appointed an honorary aide-de-camp to Hon. W. Earl Rowe, lieutenantgovernor of Ontario. This appointment was regarded as an honor to the community and to the Regiment, as well as to the officer appointed. Capt. Kell began his military career in 1939 and served overseas with the R.C.A.S.C. as an N.C.O. He was returned to Canada for officer training and graduated from Gordon Head, B.C. in 1942. In 1949 he joined the 60th L.A.A. Regiment and has continued to serve to the present time.
On 15 May 1964 Col. W. H. Seamark, C.D., Chief of Staff at Central Command was the guest of honor at a dinner in the Officers’ Mess. Col. Seamark joined the Regiment in 1933 at the age of fifteen. A distinguished career in the Regular Army preceded his present appointment.
Lt. Col. R. C. Tivy, the present commanding officer, began his military career at the age of 16 in The Prince of Wales Rangers in 1939. His long service and experience as a soldier and professional engineer provides him with an excellent background for command. He assumes command as the immediate future of the Regiment is assured, a future to which he has already made a large contribution.
On 24 November 1964 Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper, C.D., was honored at a Mess Dinner when he was presented with an engraved silver tray by Lt. Col. R. C. Tivy, C.D., on behalf of the officers of the Regiment. The dinner was attended by serving officers and their wives.
Exercise Frostbite during the winter of 1964.
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On 5 December 1964 a formal “change of command” parade was held with a full turn out of the Regiment and in the presence of over 150 spectators. Following the parade the Honorary Colonel, Brig. Snow, presented a serving tray and water pitcher to the Sergeants’ Mess.
Brig. J. S. Ross, D.S.O., C.D. inspects H.Q. Coy with Company Commander Major E. M. Wells, C.D.
NOMINAL ROLL OF THE OFFICERS OF THE REGIMENT
1 January 1966 Honorary Colonel
Brig. T. E. D’O. Snow, O.B.E., C.St.J., C.D. Hon. Lieutenant-Colonel Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D., C.D. Commanding Officer Lt. Col. R. C. Tivy, C.D. Second-in-Command
Major J. G. Scott, C.D. Major A. W. H. Cheffins, C.D. Major H. E. S. Grout Major P. B. Nicholson, C.D. Captain S. J. Cowan Captain R. J. Fraser Captain S. V. Kell, C.D. Captain J. B. Kirby Captain H. McBratney, E.D. Captain R. M. Paul Captain W. E. Row Lieutenant D. A. S. Fraser Lieutenant D. J. E. Gray Lieutenant P. Harrison Lieutenant G. D. Holmes Lieutenant D. J. Kernaghan Lieutenant J. R. Muir Lieutenant J. J. J. Power Lieutenant J. C. F. Sheflin Lieutenant A. T. Reid Second Lieut. R. A. Kirby Second Lieut. W. A. G. Montgomery
Second-Lieut. A. E. Wheeler Attached Officers
. Captain C. J. Betts (Chaplain) Captain G. M. Hendry, C.D., (Paymaster) Captain R. P. Miller (Medical Officer) Captain C. O. McDougall (Dental Officer) Lieutenant W. R. J. Vallance, C.D.
(Signals Officer)
Warrant Officers and Senior Non-Commissioned Officers Regimental Sergeant-Major R.S.M. (W.O.1) Elliott, S. J. Bugle-Major
C.S.M. (W.O.II) Elliott, R. E., C.D. Drill Sergeant-Major Instructor
C.S.M. (W.O.II) Gill, W. J., C.D.
Colonel W. H. Seamark, C.D. signs guest book following Mess Dinner on 15 May 1964.
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Regimental
Quartermaster-Sergeant
*Lt. Col. C. V, W, Vickers, D.S.O., E.D.
1948-1951 *Lt. Col. C. S. Maclaren, M.C., E.D.
1951-1954 Lt. Col. W. S. Watson, S.St.J. 1954-1958, 1959/1962 Lt. Col. J. D. Cooper, C.D. 1958-1959, 1962-1964 Deceased
C.S.M. (W.O.II) Todd, R. E., C.D. C.S.M. (W.O.IT) Bowen, H. T., C.D. C.S.M. (W.O.II) Burns, E. J. C.S.M. (W.O.Il) Lamb, W. C., C.D. C.S.M. (W.O.IT) Merriman, D. E. C.Q.M.S.
Kelly, P. C.Q.M.S.
Morgan, R. J. C.Q.M.S.
Rothwell, J. I., C.D. C.Q.M.S.
Young, J. M., C.D. Sgt.
Boucher, J. Paul Sgt.
Boucher, J. Pierre Sgt.
Dryden, W. D.
Forrester, L. H., C.D. Sgt.
Mallette, H. Sgt.
Mcllvenna, R. E. Sgt.
McRobie, J. B.
Read, R. R. Sgt.
Shaw, R. H. Sgt.
Tekamp, B. Sgt.
Thom, J. A. Sgt.
Todd, C. B., C.D. 1. Sgt.
Davison, D. E. H. L Sgt.
Forrest, C. L. L/Sgt.
Fournier, E. J., C.D. I Sgt.
McMahon, L. B., C.D.
Sgt.
Sgt.
FORMER COMMANDING OFFICERS OF THE REGIMENT
(Including Those Who Served Prior to 1866) “Lt. Col. James Breakenridge, J.P.
1796-1803 Col. Joel Stone
1803-1822 “Lt. Col. L. P. Sherwood
1822-1830 Lt. Col. The Hon. James Morris
1830-1846 *Lt. Col. The Hon. George Sherwood
1856-1866 *Lt. Col. James Crawford, M.P.P.
1866-1871 *Lt. Col. W. H. Cole
1871-1898 “Lt. Col. T. W. Sparham
1898-1904 “Lt. Col. A. A. Fisher
1904-1910 “Lt. Col. W. S. Buell, C.B.E., V.D.
1910-1914 *Lt. Col. C. T. Wilkinson
1914-1916 *Maj. John Power, V.D.
1916-1920 Lt. Col. M. W. MacDowell, M.C.
1920-1925 Col. R. J. Gill, M.C., V.D.
1925-1929 “Lt. Col. F. C. Curry, V.D.
1929-1933 *Lt. Col. J. R. McCullough, V.D.
1933-1936 Lt. Col. N. L. MacDowell, E.D.
1936-1943 Lt. Col. M. L. Douglas
1943-1945 *Lt. Col. D. E. Lewis, O.B.E., E.D.
1942-1947 (1st Bn.) Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D., C.D.
1945-1948
1965 A YEAR OF CHALLENGE This proved to be a year with more than its share of challenges. The re-organization of the Militia which began in 1964 reached a climax in 1965. While many of the changes brought desirable results, the transition period was very difficult. Officer turnover in 1965 was another of the challenges. One company had four different commanders in a period of four months. Over the entire unit, only one company commander carried through from Sept. 64 to June 65. This turnover plus the problems of introducing many new officers to the unit, plus the problems resulting from an overall lack of experience imposed a severe strain. It is to the credit of all that the unit quickly settled down and, at the end of the training year all elements were functioning well. A third challenge in 1965 was the speedy return to infantry field training. This was a welcome change. But it brought its share of problems as a number of the junior officers and N.C.O.’s had “grown up” during the survival years and therefore had little corps training. Once again, diligent work by those involved soon filled the vacuum.
During the Easter vacation 40 high school students and members of the Regiment participated in a special course under I.t. G. Holmes and Lt. D. Fraser.
In May, a guard of honor was provided for the Prime Minister, the Honorable Lester B. Pearson, on the occasion of his visit to Brockville. The guard was commanded by Lt. John Power. The same guard plus the Bugle Band appeared at the official opening of Upper Canada Village earlier in the month.
The Band was provided with fur busbies in 1965 at a cost to the unit of $1,250,00. These appeared to spur them on to an even greater level of efficiency under the capable leadership of Bugle Major Elliott. Once again they won a number of awards in competition with bands from Upper New York State and Ontario. The Bugle Band was “authorized” as a component of the Regiment in May. The Command Inspector of Bands rated the band as “Among the best in the Militia—the dress and drill would be a credit to any Regular Force Band”.
The South Grenville District High School Cadets requested and were granted authority to affiliate with the Regiment. This corps had previously affiliated with the P.L.D.G. Lt. Col. Tivy had the honor of inspecting both S.G.D.H.S. and B.C.I.V.S. cadet corps at their annual inspections.
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The Regiment was saddened at the news that the Victoria Rifles of Canada in Montreal were to be disbanded. Through the kindness of their last Commanding Officer, Lt. Col. E. P. McGovern, ED., a number of band instruments, pieces of mess silver and furnishings plus uniforms and busbies were passed on to us. The Brocks undertook a promise to have the Bugle Band always carry one drum on parade with Victoria Rifles’ Battle Honors.
The IV P.L.D.G. was another regiment that fell under the re-organization “axe”. From ‘C’ Sqn. in Prescott, Lt. Vallance, Sgts. Kelly, Thom, Mallette and Mcllvenna, along with several corporals and troopers transferred to the Regiment. These were excellent additions and quickly became good “Riflemen”.
Captains Kell and Row were forced by higher authority to retire during the year. These two officers joined Major Cameron and Captain McBratney in forming the corps of “non-paid effectives”. These officers parade regularly without pay and perform as many duties as most officers on strength. Such loyal devotion to the Regiment has never been seen elsewhere.
The 99th Rifles Ball held on 5 Nov. 68 was another success in the long chain of successful dances. The Guest of Honor was The Honorable Earl Rowe, Lieutenant Governor, Province of Ontario. The attendance was over 250 people.
REGIMENTAL BUGLE BAND WITH PIONEER SECTION FRONT ROW LEFT TO RIGHT – Cpl. G. S. Johnston, Cpl. F. J. L. White, Rin. L. R. Koch, L/Sgt. L. B. McMahon, Rfn. R. T. D. Hum, w.o.1 R. F. Elliott, w.0.2 D. E. Merriman, Cpl. T, Elliott, Rfn. W. G. Skelton, Sgt. C. J. Price, Sgt. A. D. CENTRE ROW LEFT TO RIGHT – L/Cpl. R. A. Row, Rfn. E. L. Hutt, Rfn, S. E. Tyo, Rfn. E. C. Base, Rfn. H. T. R. Bowen, Rfn. G. A. Seaton, Rfn. D. M. Crawford, Rfn. P. A. Bough, Cpl. F. E. Pakenham. REAR ROW LEFT TO RIGHT – L/Sgt. K. G. Whiteland, L/Sgt. W. A. Barnhardt, Rfn, H. L. Koch, L/Cpl. J. C. Plumley, Rfn. F. G. Bowen, Rfn. E. E. Hutt, L/Sgt. B. W. Blair, Rfn. H. Burns. Knott.
Reception line at 99th Rifles Ball, 1965–left to right Major P. Nicholson, Mess President; Mrs. Nicholson, His Honor W. Earl Rowe, LieutenantGovernor of Ontario, Mrs. William Rowe, Lt. Col. R. C. Tivy and Mrs.
Tiry.
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spared to participate, as he did in so many important Regimental activities in the past, in the Centennial of the Regiment. His knowledge of the history of this area, and especially the military knowledge, has fortunately been recorded, at least in part, in the numerous articles he wrote on this subject over the years. His death severed a link with the past which can never be fully repaired.
Cpl. W. B. Montgomery and Sgt. R. A. Kirby were appointed 2 (Lts. late in the year-both following their older brothers from the ranks to commissioned service. They joined 2 Lt. Wheeler (R.C.A.P.C.) who had been appointed earlier in the year.
The policy of attaching Regular Army personnel was re-instated. The Unit was fortunate in getting the services of Sgt. D. C. Davidson and Cpl. P. V. Ullyett. Both are members of the “Black Watch” and both are good soldiers.
Summer Camp was held at Camp Petawawa during the first week of July. The entire week was spent on weapon training and field operations. Highlights of the week were the “posh” messes managed by S Sgt. Young and Sgt. Fournier, Padre Betts’ Mobile N.A.A.F.I., Major Grout’s fantastic demonstration of navigation and Bugle Major Elliott’s night patrol that was intercepted by the Provost.
A successful Student Militia Course was held during the summer. The chief instructor was Lt. John Inrig, an officer on loan from the Hasty P’s.
A demonstration of loyalty undoubtedly prompted by long association with the Regiment was noted during this year when R.S. M. E. J. Burns was succeeded as senior warrant officer by C.S.M. S. J. Elliott. R.S.M. Burns stepped down from the post which he had held for five years but volunteered to serve as long as his services were required as a C.S.M. He had also been B.S.M. of 32 Locating Battery for two years. His successor, also a former B.S.M. of 32 Locating Battery, had been succeeded in that post by R.S. M. Burns, and he had, at that time, agreed to continue to serve as a T.B.S.M. R.S.M. Elliott is a member of a family which has contributed more than 150 years of service to the Regiment.
His father was R.S.M. from 1941 to 1942. He joined the Regiment as a rifleman in 1933 and except for the years 1958-1959 has served continuously, R.S. M. Burns joined the Regiment as a rifleman in 1936 and has served almost continuously, including service in World War II with the Stormont Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders. Lt. Col. Tivy expressed the appreciation of the Regiment to these warrant officers who have served so long and so efficiently.
THE OFFICERS’ MESS The present home of the officers of The Regiment is located on the second floor of the Brockville Armoury and occupies the south-west corner, including the tower room. At one time approximately half the area was used as the Sergeants’ Mess.
The Mess consists of a cloakroom, anteroom, messroom, library and bar. A brick fireplace dominates the messroom. A Brockville Rifles Badge carved in stone is centred in the brick above the fireplace and below the mantel. Crests of The 60th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A. and The 32nd Locating Battery (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A. have been carved and inset in the brick on either side of the fireplace. A large wooden Brockville Rifles erest hangs on the wall above the fireplace. Two 40 mm Bofors shells and two heavy anti-aircraft shells flank the fireplace. The wide mantel is used to display items of historic interest and Mess silver from time to time.
The library, which also serves as a cardroom, is well stocked with military reference books, history books, and other books of interest to a soldier. Some of these books are very old and provide a look into the past, and how training and fighting was done in those days. A rug, the gift of The Victoria Rifles of Canada, covers the floor. The badge of that unit, woven into the rug, reminds us of a famous Rifles Regiment which has recently disappeared from the order of battle. Chairs, trophies, a clock, a table and silver pieces located in various positions in the Mess are further reminders of “the Vies” and their generosity to our Regiment when they disposed of some of their property.
The Mess room is well furnished and provides an atmosphere of dignity and relaxation.
The anteroom reflects a great deal of history. On the south wall is a complete collection of photographs of former commanding officers beginning with Lt. Col. James Breakenridge. This collection is believed to be one of the few complete collections held by any Militia unit. A pieture of the Armorial Bearing of the Breakenridge family is hung on the east wall. It was the gift of Howard Willard Warner, Esq., U.E., a greatgreat-great-grandnephew. Some of the most valuable documents framed and displayed on the north wall include: the appointment by Sir John Colborne, Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada and Major-General commanding His Majesty’s forces therein, of Adiel Sherwood to be colonel and to command First Regiment of Leeds on April 17, 1830.
Training resumed in the fall and the year’s activities terminated on 19 Dec. 65 when 170 all ranks were inspected by the Honorary Colonel, Brigadier T. E. D’O, Snow. This parade was noteworthy as Lt. Col. Johnston along with It. Vallance and Corporal See received the Canadian Forces Decoration. Major Scott and Captain Kell were awarded clasps.
A note of sadness for the Regiment sounded on 25. Dec. 1965 with the sudden death of Lt. Col. Frederick Crawford Curry, V.D. who had commanded the Regiment from 1929 to 1933. A guard of honor of officers of the Regiment attended his funeral on 28 December at St. Peter’s Church. Five former commanding officers of the Regiment acted as honorary pallbearers. It seems unfortunate that Lt. Col. Curry was not
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The appointment on January 1, 1839 of Thomas Reynolds to be a lieutenant in the Ninth Provisional Battalion of Militia by Sir George Arthur, Lieutenant-Governor of The Province of Upper Canada, and Major-General Commanding His Majesty’s Forces therein.
The appointment by Sir Edward Walker Head, Governor-General of British North America, Captain-General and Governor in Chief in and over the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Island of Prince Edward, and Vice-Admiral of the same, of Doctor Thomas Reynolds to be a surgeon in the Brockville Battalion of Militia on March 20, 1856.
The appointment by Isaac Brock, President, administering the Govcrnment of The Province of Upper Canada and Major-General Commanding His Majesty’s Forces therein—of John McNish to be ensign in the First Regiment of Leeds Militia under the command of Colonel James Breakenridge on June 23, 1812.
The appointment by Sir Peregrine Maitland, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Upper Canada and Major-General Commanding His Majesty’s Forces therein, of John McNish as a captain in the Fourth Regiment of Leeds Militia in the Johnstown District under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Bartholomew Carley on April 13, 1822.
The medals worn by the late Torrence Glazier, 41st Battalion Brockville Rifles are also displayed in a frame on the north wall of the anteroom. These medals include Fenian Raid 1870, Boer War-1900 Service Medal, The Great War 1914-1918 Medal, and the Long Service Medal. Also on display in this area are the actual chevrons worn by the late Allison Bowie, Scots Fusilier Guards, 3rd Battalion, London, England 1815.
Many of these historic items will be moved to the Regimental Museum.
The Mess Silver includes candelabra, trays, tea-urns, bowls, cream and sugar sets, cocktail shakers and other items donated from time to time by former officers, honorary members, the Ladies Auxiliary, the Badminton Club and other groups and individuals. A bugle used during the charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava is a proud possession of the Mess. Many old, and many recently won trophies are displayed.
A View of the Sergeants’ Mess
THE SERGEANTS’ MESS A visit to the area occupied by the warrant officers, staff-sergeants and sergeants of the Regiment, in the eastern half of the second floor of the Brockville Armouries is a rewarding privilege. The Mess includes the
whole area which was the living quarters of the caretaker and his family in the days when that busy individual was on duty twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. The last occupants were R.S.M. A. N. Clarke, M.M., and family.
The officers’ Mess Room
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The present Mess includes a fully equipped kitchen, bar, anteroom, and a spacious lounge. There is, of course, a piano which is the centre of many a happy evening, and of recent years a number of dart boards have been provided to cater to those who test their skill in this popular game. An atmosphere of just enough military formality mixed with good fellowship and relaxation is pleasingly evident. Old members like to recall the days when they shared half of the space now occupied by the officers in the west end of the building, but they admit that they are now much better off.
It is customary when proposing a toast or making a speech to refer to the N.C.O.s as the backbone of the Regiment. In the Brockville Rifles it is a fact beyond dispute. N.C.O.s in the main seem to serve longer than officers in this Regiment. Not only do they have a large part in making regimental history but also because of their long service they live with it. They are in the position of being able to compare accurately the present with the past. Consequently they are able to exert a certain constant pressure on the men, and on each other, to ensure that insofar as it is within their power the present standards of discipline and training are equal to, or greater, than the accomplishments of days gone by. Service in excess of thirty years is not uncommon. Members of the
Mess have gone on to commissioned rank. Two of them were recent commanding officers of the Regiment. Others have been commissioned or risen to warrant rank in other regiments and arms of the service in war and peace. The pride, the loyalty, the discipline, learned as a young sergeant in this mess never seems to wear off. The walls of the Mess reflect regimental history in the faces of keen men captured by the camera while they were members of the Mess. Some wear Rifles uniforms, others remind us of the days when we were gunners. These groups include:
A photo of members of the 41st Regimental Band organized in 1878 includes the following. J. Stinson, Bandmaster; C. H. Hutton, B. Sugg, G. Robinson, H. Dawson, H. Albery, B. E. Eck, C. W. LeClair, H. E. Barriger, R. Driscoll, A. LeClair, F. Baldwin, S. W. Bell, H. Edwards, M. Gilbert, G. Burridge, E. Timleck, H. Timleck, E. Burridge, J. G. Bell, F. H. Kay.
Sergeants’ Mess 41st Regiment Brockville Rifles 1907. R.S.M. A. N. Clarke, W. O. Stinson, Bandmaster, Hosp. Sgt. Miller, Col. Sgt. Woodcock, Col. Sgt. Edwards, O.R. Sgt. W. Edwards, Q.M. Sgt. Cowie, Pay Sgt. Shortt, Sgts. Jacobs, Dukelow, Ringer, Turner, Bugle Major Nicholson, Col. Sgt. Fox, Sgt. Seekings, Sgt. Fader, Sgt. Browne, Sgt. Johnston, Sgt. Stayner, Sgt. Barnes, Sgt. Barnhart, Sgt. Fox, Sgt. O’Donahoe, Sgt. O’Niell, Sgt. Mervin.
L. Breakell, J. Mallette, A. I. Munro, W. H. Harper, T.C. Dunford, Pioneer Sgt. S. Hinton, Sigs. Sgt. F. C. Shotter, M.M., C.Q.M.S. F. J. Humphreys, C.Q.M.S. J. E. Fox, O.R. Sgt. E. Moden.
The Sergeants’ Mess The Brockville Rifles 1939. R.S.M. O. E. Charlton, Bde. Sgt. Major A. N. Clarke, M.M., Drum Major J. F. E. Elliott, R.Q.M.S. H. A. Morton, C.S.M. D. E. Hodgins, C.S.M. L. F. J. MacDermott, C.S.M. E. J. Hellyer, C.S.M. E. C. Moden, C.S. M. G. E. Mates, C.S.M. E. E. Spurge, C.Q.M.S. B. D. Madden, C.Q.M.S. J. Descareau, M.M., C.Q.M.S. K. G. Fox, Sgts. A. Forrester, J. Mates, J. P. Mepham, G. Fennell, J. W. Watson, K. G. Hanna, M. Boisvert, D. A. Hagerty. C. W. Wilson, M. Jones, J. A. Conley, W. Stillwell, T. M. Fox, B. R. Fraser, E. R. Mallette, G. B. Oliver, J. W ceks, W. J. Scamark, W. J. Miller.
The Sergeants’ Mess 60th L.A.A. Regiment (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A. 1951. R.S.M. W. F. Webb, R.Q.M.S. O. E. Charlton, M.B.E., B.S.M. S. J. Elliott, B.S.M. E. J. Burns, T.B.S.M. S. W. Simpson, J. M. Bradford, R. L. Smith; Sgts. M. C. Snider, E. McGurrin, E. L. McGurrin, H. E. Williams, E. M. Newton, G. T. Christopher, W. J. R. Timms, A. C. Albertson, E. A. Thomas, A. M. Markell, L. F. Milne, J. W. Peer, D. J. Elliott, G. C. Markell, W. O. Mott, A. G. Forrester.
The Sergeants’ Mess 32nd Locating Battery (Brockville Rifles) R.C.A. 1959. B.S.M. E. J. Burns, WOII G. C. Markell, WOII R. E. Todd, S Sgt. G. M. St. Lawrence, S Sgt. D. J. Elliott, Sgts. D. J. Gray, H. I. Rothwell, F. A. Pruner, W. S. Adams, L. H. Forrester, S/Sgt. A. M. Markell, S Sgt. W. O, Mott, Sgt. M. H. Knott, L ‘Sgts. E. M. Mainwaring, R. J. Murray, J. M. Young, R. F. Elliott, J. M. Hale.
A Roll of Honor in memory of former members of the Mess who gave their lives in two wars is proudly displayed. 1914-1918
1939-1945 Sgt. A. J. Brister
Lt. C. F. Heald Lt. A. Knill
Sgt. G. W. Hone L Cpl. W. Deir
Sgt. E, W. Baker, M.M. Cpl. J. L. Mates
Sgt. W. G. McKee Cpl. M. McMahon
Sgt. J. M. Storey Lt. R. Corbett
Capt. B. D. Madden Sgt. H. C. Ablard
C.S.M. E. E. Spurge Maj. H. H. Edwards “Their name shall remain for ever and their glory shall not be blotted out.”
Sergeants’ Mess Brockville Rifles 1926. R.S.M. A. N. Clarke, M.M., C.S.M. O. E. Charlton, R.Q.M.S. A. Wooding, C.S.M. E. J. Claxton, C.S.M. E. T. Collins, Band Master V. S. Tompkins, C.S.M. George Mates, Bugle Major J.F. Elliott, C.Q.M.S. H. A. Morton, C.Q.M.S. W. T. Walby, Hospital Sgt. S. Cairns, Sgts. L. Eligh, S. Turland, J. J. Keir, F. C. Hellyer,
An attractive membership board, the gift of W.O.II G. C. Markell, C.D., a veteran of twenty-seven years service in the Regiment and Regi
mental Band discloses the names of active, associate and life members of the Mess. A silver water pitcher and tray, the gift of Brig. Eric Snow, O.B.E., C.St.J., C.D., Honorary Colonel of the Regiment, is a treasured asset.
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Dormont Indes and
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One of the most prized possessions of the Mess is a collection of portraits of former Regimental and Battery Sergeants-Major. This group includes the following: R.S.M. J. Tink
1902 R.S.M. J. Short
1903 R.S.M. A. N. Clarke, M.M.
1904-1930 R.S.M. O. E. Charlton, M.B.E.
1930-1931, 1937-1940 R.S.M. E. J. Claxton
1931-1937 R.S.M. G. E. Mares
1940-1941 R.S.M. J. E. Elliott
1941-1942 R.S.M. A. F. Miller
1942-1949 R.S.M. W. F. Webb
1949-1954 B.S. M. S. J. Elliott
1954-1958 B.S.M. (later R.S.M.) E. J. Burns
1958-1965 R.S.M. S. J. Elliott
1965-1966
Roll of Honour Memorial Plaque of Stormont Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders is presented to the 32nd Locating Battery, 1957 left to right Keith Pelton, President of Brockville Association of the Glens, Lt. Col. D. E. Lewis, O.B.E., E.D.
Extensive renovations are being planned in anticipation of the Centennial.
THE RIFLEMENS’ CANTEEN The comfort of the riflemen and junior N.C.O.s has not been overlooked. Well furnished rooms for their relaxation and entertainment have been provided on the main floor at the south-east corner of the Armoury. Plans for renovations and improvement of facilities were announced as this history is being written.
ULIMUZIN KULLANIRLARINING MANU
1. Bliainber of
FOontzerce.
Se Brockvu
REGIMENTAL MUSEUM A Centennial project will be the establishment of a Regimental Museum. A large display case has been built and placed in the Common Room as the first step in the programme. A number of items will be on display in this case beginning in 1966 which will be of interest to present and former members of the Regiment. The Regiment will welcome additional items which are given or loaned to the Museum. Items which have an association with the Regiment or former members are required. It is not the intention to display war souvenirs which do not have such an association.
It is expected that items presently displayed in the Messes will be moved to the museum.
| YTAN. WZRGANMESAGENSIGTENZGASSE W
hereas it do Alemotorn of Gie Brockville Chambe et comme ce to make
MeCogliono Alonso de ten o LommunIE WARNING
164 above. TLR penal Newandhave made an Outlanding Cont AHO. ANG Anong and capability. To The na Commune and all who wel hereineen SAT- 1 herefore be it known by these presents that the Chamber of Commerce does hereby. And herewithe name rradheannfor ISES
The Brockville Rifles = CITIZENS OF THE YEAR
NINETEEN HUNDRER ANR SITYIX. Siegmenty celebrating. One Andred Lane Berwice Aeneantlacon 4tituted. Ae Apot pie ne Aegiment extend back bekend a centum anda Hallo A day when namalion was and proted to maintain Inter mined allegiance to a town, Jungreal and famous named as comunita are added se lo l And ML ITINEO of peacentme of wat Brockustl aono have Apendid le lo al to duty. And to aume Mhe Brockville 140 hat evene TIARA ARANORAMed 110 MGTES DARIN EIL OLI RIIzneV Ate APIMLand Radion u Areal Regiment contre le lounik. Zn he Agears ilial e ahead,
layelihel 29 E
Brashville, Out Feh 25, 1966.
BATEKO NUMA Arawd McLOR CORESPONSE TOASEMA Citizens of the Year Award Presented to the Regiment by the Brockville Chamber of Commerce in 1966.
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32nd Locating Battery wins three militia group competitions in 1957 left to right L/Sgt. Eihel Turman, Capt. H. McBratney, Sgt. H. Bowen.
“D” Coy 108 Infantry N.Y. National Guard visits the 60th L.A.A. Regt. in 1948.
The Regimental Museum established in 1966 as a Centennial Project
A flag lowering ceremony in Gunner days.
136
137z
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138
Active members of The Sergeants’ Mess, The Brockville Rifles photographed following the church parade on 19 June 1966 FRONT ROW SEATED LEFT TO RIGHT – S/Sgt. H, I. Rothwell, S/Sgt. P. Kelly, W.0.2 R. F. Todd, W.0, 2 W. J. Gill, W.0.1 R. F. Elliott, W.C.. H. T. Bowen, w.0.2 D. E. Merriman, S/Sgt. J. P. Boucher, S/Sgt. R. J. Morgan. SECOND ROW STANDING LEFT TO RIGHT – Sgt. D. C. Davidson, L/Sgt. F. J. Fournier, Sgt. J. B. McRobie, L/Sgt.
W. A. Barnhardt, Sgt. R. H. Shaw, L/Sgt. L. B. McMahon, L/Sgt. W. B. Blair, L/Sgt. K. G. Whiteland, Sgt. C. J. Price, Sgt. P. U. R. Ulliott. BACK ROW LEFT TO RIGHT — Sgt. R. F. McIlrenna, Sgt. B. Tekamp, Sgt. W. D. Dryden, Sgt. D. L. Sterritt, Sgt. J. A. Thom, Sgt. H. Mallette.
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1564
CANADA
156th LEEDS AND GRENVILLE BATTALION
In the fall of 1915 the possibility of a County Battalion being raised for overseas service was mentioned, and in December 1915, authority was received from district headquarters to mobilize the 156th Leeds and Grenville Battalion C.E.E., by Lt. Col. C. T. Wilkinson. Lt. Col. J. A. McCammon was appointed provisional C.O. of the 136th Battalion and was in command until the latter part of December 1915. Lt. Col. Wilkinson took over until the end of April 1916, at which time Lt. Col. T. C. D. Bedell, lately returned from the 15th Battalion C.E.F. overseas, was given command, taking over 3 May, 1916. Other officers who at this early stage joined the battalion were Maj. A. M. Patterson, Maj. H. H. Ed
wards, Maj. R. J. Gill, Maj. G. W. Elliott, Maj. T. A. Kidd, Capt. G. R. Long, Capt. (Rev.) A. E. Hagar, Capt. P. B. Whiteley, Capt. W. N. Graham, and Capt. C. A. Donaldson.
On receipt of orders to mobilize, immediate action was taken to recruit members, and 14 recruiting offices were opened in the two counties. Recruiting Officers held meetings and men were brought to the Brockville Armouries for medical examination and the issue of uniforms with equipment. Battalion headquarters was at Brockville as well as “A” and “B” Companies whose men were drawn from Brockville, Gananoque, Lansdowne and Mallorytown and were provided quarters in the Brockville Fair Grounds. “C” Company area included Athens, Delta, Lyndhurst, Elgin, Newboro and Westport. The men of this company
were trained in their own localities, where they were billeted by recruiting officers. “D” Company area included Prescott, Cardinal, Kemptville and
Merrickville where the men received training while billeted in their homes. At Prescott, personnel were quartered in barracks at the Mansion House on Water street.
Recruiting efforts included meetings held at different points in the Counties at which civilian speakers were used.
In April 1916, the two Companies quartered at Brockville, with regimental band and stretcher bearers, left on a trek through Grenville County. The party stopped at Prescott the first night, Cardinal the second night, and through Shanly to Spencerville for the third night, Kemptville the fourth night, Burritt’s Rapids the fifth night, Merrickville the sixth night, and North Augusta the seventh night, returning to Brockville on the eighth day of trek.
One week later the other two companies left on a trek through Leeds County, going to Mallorytown, Lansdowne, Lyndhurst, Delta, Elgin, Toledo, Frankville, Athens, and returning to Brockville.
During both of these treks, the personnel were quartered in rinks, churches, town halls and fair grounds. Messing and cooking details were arranged for by quartermaster and staff of cooks. In many places the people of the Counties provided meals and did everything possible for the unit.
Through the generosity of the late Senator A. C. Hardy and family, instruments were presented to the Band.
During the early winter the unit was billeted in quarters at the Brockville Fair Grounds following the leaving for overseas of the 59th Battalion, and in May the unit went to Barriefield, was placed under canvas, and underwent training during the spring and summer of 1916.
Through the efforts of the General Brock Chapter 1.O.D.E., which carried on much work of value during the war, colors were presented at The Fair Grounds, Brockville on 17 August, 1916. The colors were procured through a subscription list opened by the Chapter of which
Mrs. W. Fred Jackson was at the time Regent, After being inspected by Brig. Gen. T. D. R. Hemming, Lt. Col. C. G. Williams, Chief Recruiting Officer, and Lt. Col. T. C. D. Bedell, the battalion formed a hollow square, the drums being piled in the form of an altar, from which the colors were presented to the color party by Lady White. The King’s color was received by Lt. K. C. Rowe, and the regimental color by Lt. George D. Woodcock. Other members of the color party were Bde. S.M. A. N. Clarke, C.S.M.’s C. H. Fox, E. J. Claxton and G. C. O’Shea.
Among those who spoke at the presentation were Sir Thomas White, M.P., Hon. Senator George Taylor, Hon. Dr. John D. Reid, M.P., Arthur C. Hardy, John R. Dargavel, M.P.P., A. E. Donovan, M.P.P., Andrew Ferguson, Warden of The United Counties, and Lt. Col. C. G. Williams.
During the proceedings the L.O.D.E. presented Lt. Col. Bedell with a cheque for $160.00 to be used in buying comforts on arrival in England. Each man received a package of cigars, the gift of Mrs. G. T. Fulford, and a package of cigarettes, the gift of J. Gill Gardiner. In addition a barrel of tobacco, donated by well-wishers and gathered at MacDermott’s cigar store, was presented. Testaments were presented by Lady White.
On 11 November, 1916, the colors were placed on the memorial to General Wolfe in Westminster Abbey, the dedication ceremony conducted by the Dean in the presence of several officers and N.C.O.s of the battalion. There they remained until 1919 when they were brought back to Brockville at the instance of the General Brock Chapter.
On 16 October the battalion entrained at Kingston for Halifax, sailing from that port on 19 October, 1916, on the SS Northland. The officers who accompanied the battalion were Lt. Col. T. C. D. Bedell,
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OFFICERS ATTENDING UNVEILING BROCKVILLE WAR MEMORIAL, 23rd MAY, 1924 Front Row-Major J. E. MacKay, M.C., Cey. W. H. Lloyd, Lieut. R. H. Sheridan, Lieut. H. R. Starr, Lieut. C. A. McCalpin, Hon. Capt. W. R. Bannerman,
Lieut. F. R. Gilbert, Lieut. C. A. Beattie, Lieut. L. S. Beattie. Sitting–Major R. N. Horton, Lt-Col. A. E. Harris, Lt-Col. F. B. Carron, Lt-Col. M. W. MacDowell, M.C., Major W. L. Baynes-Reid, D.S.O., V.D.,
Major F. C. Curry, Major S. J. Montgomery, Major N. L. MacDowell. Back Row-Capt. R. F. Craig, Lieut. W. E. Williams, Capt. W. F. Jac kson, Lt-Col. A. W. Gray, V.D., Lieut. E. C. Cossitt, Capt. E. B. Moles, Capt. W.G. Keough, C.c.s.,
Capt. A. F. C. Whalley, Capf. G. D. Woodcock, Major J. R. McCullough, Lleut. H. A. Taylor, Lieut. G. R. Johnston, Lieut. D. E. Lewis, Lieut. J. E. Flanigan, D.C.M., M.M.
O.C., Maj. H. H. Edwards, Maj. G. W. Elliott, Maj. R. J. Gill, Maj. C. T. Wilkinson, Hon. Capt. A. H. Allen, Capts. C. A. Donaldson, C. R. Donovan, R. C. Gaisford, J. H. Graham, W. N. Graham, Hon. Capt. A. E. Hagar, Capt. E. J. Kvle, Capt. E. M. McBrayne, Hon. Capt. P. B. Whiteley, Lts. D. M. Bissell, W. R. Carnwith, W. J. Chapman, T. S. Heaslip, A. S. Heron, W. H. Mackey, R. G. Masson, J. R. McCullough, C. R. McHenry, L. R. McKenna, L. J. Scott, B. S. Stayner, ard G. D. Woodcock.
The battalion landed at Liverpool and went to Witley camp arriving there about 31 October. Shortly after arriving at Witley, the unit was broken up and junior officers and other ranks were used as reinforcements for the 109th, 116th, 119th, 120th, 123rd and 124th Battalions, these being stationed at Bramshot. However, due to good fortune later in January 1917, the unit was reformed and returned to Witley for intensive training.
About the middle of May 1917, the unit furnished its first draft of reinforcements to the following units in the field; the 2nd, 21st, 38th and the Princess Pats. Later on, on the formation of the sth division of infantry, the 156th became a part of that division. However, it was found
that reinforcements were badly needed in the field and as a result, the · Sth Division was broken up and used to reinforce active units in France, the remainder of the 156th going to, with a few exceptions, the four battalions mentioned above.
It should also be pointed out that when the 136th was reformed at Witley, it absorbed a considerable number of all ranks from the 154th of Cornwall and 155th of Belleville, thus this unit was representative of Eastern Ontario.
The 156th played its full part, as some 10 officers and 95 other ranks were killed or died of wounds while serving with other units. Many medals and decorations were earned including one V.C. to Major Thain MacDowell, member of a well-known Brockville family which was to supply two commanding officers. Two nephews of Thain MacDowell Maj. J. P. MacDowell and Capt. R. D. D. MacDowell served in the Regiment in recent years.
Because of the contribution of men made by The Rifles to the 156th, and the engagements these men participated in with other units, we now wear on our cap badge the battle honors “Amiens” and “Pursuit to Mons”,
It would be impossible in the space available to mention all the men who served so bravely from the 16th. Many of them served in the Regiment after the Armistice. Some of these names are mentioned in this history.
It is with pride that we recall that when war was declared this Regiment offered its services immediately. If the battle honors are not as numerous as those of some other units, it is not because there was any hesitancy to brave the conditions of hardship, peril, and combat where such honors are won. The Regiment of to-day is proud to perpetuate the 156th.
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Donaldson, Lt. Col. A. S., C.A.M.C. Gilmour, Capt. W. N., R.A.M.C. Hiscox, C.S.M. W. N., 1st Battalion Jones, Lt. Col. E. W., 21st Battalion Kilgour, Lt. A. J., 4th Cdn. M. G. Company MacDowell, Maj. T. W., 38th Battalion Nichols, Pte. Frank J., P.P.C.L.I. O’Donahoe, Maj. D. J., 47th Battalion O’Donahoe, Lt. Col. J. V. P., 87th Battalion Page, Flight-Lt. J. A., R.A.F. Stewart, Lt. Ross A., 21st Battalion Wilgress, Lt. G. K. K., 21st Battalion
BROUGHT TO NOTICE OF SECRETARY OF STATE FOR WAR Bowie, Lt. Col. R. A., C.A.M.C. Buell, Lt. Col. W. S., 4th Battalion
CROIX DE GUERRE (FRANCE) Carleton, Maj. Rev. W. B., C. Ch. S. Horan, Sgt. Thomas, American Expeditionary Force MacDowell, Lt. Cuyler M., Cdn. Siege Artillery O’Donahoe, Maj. D. J., 47th Battalion
LEGION OF HONOR (FRANCE) Lumb, Lt. Col. H. W., Suffolk Regiment
Gen. Williams appealed to the loyalty of all the officers present to assist in the reorganization, and a committee was nominated composed of Lc, Col. R. A. Bowie, Maj. R. J. Gill, M.C. and others to select an officer to act as Commanding Officer, subject to the approval of D.H.Q. Col. Bowie and his committee secured the consent of Lt. M. W. MacDowell, M.C.to accept the appointment, which was confirmed by M.D. No, 3 on 23 March 1920. Col. MacDowell commenced recruiting in che Fall of 1920. Reorganization was authorized 1 November 1920 — General Order 253-1920.
When it came to deciding as to whether the new unit would be Rifles or Infantry, the officers were not unanimous, but as they had been informed that neither the 156th Battalion number, or colors could be secured it was decided to follow the Rifle traditions. Hardly had this been gazetted than the authorities reversed their decision and named us to perpetuate the 156th Battalion and to receive their colors. We thus became a Rifle Regiment with colors. It was subsequently decided to follow the Rifle traditions as far as colors were concerned, a policy which has persisted to this day.
A regrettable loss to the Regiment took place on 26 November 1920 when Lt. Col. R. A. Bowie was accidently killed by falling down an elevator shaft in St. Vincent de Paul Hospital. Following the death of Colonel Bowie, Captain E. B. Moles, who had served with distinction in France in World War I was appointed Medical Officer.
The first annual training following reorganization took place in January, February and March 1921 with the following establishment of officers: Commanding Officer:
Lt. Col. M. W. MacDowell, M.C. 2nd in Command:
Maj.
J. R. Gill, M.C. Adjutant:
S. J. Montgomery Musketry Officer:
Capt. G. F. Hollington Signalling Officer:
Lt.
J. E. Flanigan, D.C.M., M.M. Quartermaster:
Capt.
R. F. Craig Medical Officer:
Capt.
E. B. Moles Paymaster:
A. M. Patterson Chaplain:
Capt. A. F. C. Whalley “A” Company:
F. C. Curry Capt.
S. G. H. Steele, M.C. W. R. Bannerman
A. J. Koehler Lt.
C. A. McCalpin
A. W. Reynolds “B” Company:
W. A. Delahaye, M.C.
W. H. Comstock Lt.
L. S. Beattie Lt.
C. E. Fraser Lt.
H. R. Starr
ORDER OF THE CROWN (BELGIUM) Lumb, Lt. Col. H. W., Suffolk Regiment
Maj.
ORDER OF ST. GEORGE (RUSSIA) Dunham, Flight-Lt. L. J., R.N.A.S.
SERVICE MEDAL (ITALY) Giroux, Sgt.-Maj. A. P., R.A.S.C.
Maj.
Maj.
Lt. Lt.
Lt.
BETWEEN TWO WARS 1919 – 1939 Following World War I the Militia was again reorganized.
A meeting of officers of the 41st Regiment, former officers, and officers demobilized from the C.E.F., was called by Brig. Gen. V. A. S. Williams, C.M.G., D.O.C. M.D. No. 3, in the Officers’ Mess at the Brockville Armouries in January 1920 for the purpose of discussing the reorganization of the local Regiment.
Maj. Capt.
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Gilfellen, W. J., Gilroy, H. B. Gill, F. L. Glen, L. G. Grant, J. D. Greene, M. F. Grier, D. B. Griffin, G, H. Griffin, W. H. Groves, H. J. Hagarty, T. A. Haggart, R. S. Haggart, W. G. Hall, A. G. Hamilton, W. J. G. Hare, E. C. Hare, S. W. Harper, C. Harper, L. E. Hartnett, J. J. Heald, C. F. . Heaphy, E. E., Hewitt, E. R. Hitsman, F. C. Holmes, A. H. Hone, R. G. Hughes, J. Hutchings, C. M. Hutt, C. H. Hutt, G. R. Hynes, D. C. Ireland, R. Jackson, L. G. Jacques, J. L. James, W. Jenkinson, H. N. Jenkinson, K. I. Johnston, P. B. Johnson, R. P. Johnston, W. S. Kane, C. Keck, W. A. Kehoe, M. J. Kennedy, E. W. Kennedy, J. H. Kinch, C. W. Knowlton, D. C. Lackie, J. A.
.R.C.A.
.B.R. . .R.C.A.F. ..B.R. – Can. Forestry Corps .R.C.A.F. .L.A.A. Bry.
C.A. (A) 1st L.A.A. Bty. B.R.
R.C.A.F. .R.C.O.C. .R.C.O.C. .R.C.O.C. .R.C.A.S.C.
L.A.A. Bty.
L.A.A. Bty. .R.C.A. .R.C.O.C.
.B.R. . . B.R.
.R.C.N.V.R. ..R.C.O.C.
B.R. R.C.A.S.C. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 V.G.C. (A) D.D. 3 B.R. B.R. C.D.C.
C.A. (B) T.C. 31 .R.C.O.C.
B.R.
R.C.O.C. .R.C.A.F.
B.R. D.D. 3 B.R. B.R.
D.D. 3 .B.R. .R.C.O.C. .B.R. Youth Trng. D.D. 3 R.C.N.V.R. R.C.A.S.C.
28-1-42
6-4-42 1-4-42 10-4-42 27-1-42 25-8-42 14-1-42 14-3.42 26-2-42
8-4-42 3-8-42 7-1-42 7-1-42 7-1-42 9-2-42 8-1-42
8-1-42 17-12-41 28-9-42
7-4-42 11-5-42 10-3-42 20-8-42
6-4-42 26-1-42 18-2.42 16-2-42 2-10-42 8-6-42
6-4-42 15-11-42
8-1-42 8-4-42
9.4-42 19-3.42 14-4-42 20-4.42 12-8-42
9-4-42 11-5-42 6-6-42
7-4-42 23-2-42
9-4-42 13-4-42
2-3-42 24-2-42 1-5-42
Legary, J. B. Leizert, H. A., Leizert, R. S. Lewis, G. W. H. Livingstone, E. A. Livingstone, E. T. Loverin, W. H. Lyon, J. B. MacDonald, A. MacDonald, H. E. Marin, J. A. Marin, J. E. Marrs, J. J. Marrs, J. J. Marshall, R. S. Massey, W. H. Matthews, H. H. McClure, W. E. McCurrie, W. McDonald, C. C. McFadden, V. W. McKechnie, N. S. McLaughlin, G. L. McLeod, J. M. McReynolds, M. McSorley, C. M. Mercier, C. W. Merkley, W. B. Millar, G. E. Miller, A. H. Milne, H. M. Mitten, F. E. Moffitt, G. J. Montroy, P. S. Moore, M. L. Munro, I. T. Murphy, L. E. Murray, J. C. Nesbitt, G. S. Nicol, W. Ladd, A. W. Lamoureux, W. A. Lapierre, C. D. Latham, H. E. Latham, S. H. Latimer, J. D. Lavere, H. M. Lawrence, H. B. Leeder, P. A.
C.A. (A) .R.C.A.F. . Clearing Depot .C.A. (A) .R.C.A.F. .R.C.A.E.
B.R. R.C.N.V.R. R.C.O.C. C.A. (A) B.R. B.R. D.D. 3 B.R. C.A. (A) L.A.A. Bty. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 Ist L.A.A. Bty. B.R. Tech. School C.A. (B) T.C. 33 B.R. R.C.A.F. C.A. (A) R.C.O.C. Clearing Depot L.A.A. Bty. B.R. R.C.A.S.C. B.R. B.R. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. Clearing Depot R.C.N.V.R. R.C.A.F. Clearing Depot B.R. B.R. Clearing Depot L.A.A. Bry. R.C.A.F.
6-6-42 15-1-42
6-6-42 6-6-42 8-3-42 6-6-42 13-4-42
2-3-42 21-2-42 24-2-42 7-4-42
7-4-42 18-8-42 18-6-42
4-8-42 6-2-42 18-2.42 19.3.42 7-4-42
1-9-42 20-11-42 20-4-42 22-1-42 3-10-42
7-1-42 14-3-42
9-2-42 7-4-42 15-4-42 14-5-42
8-4-42 16-3-42
6-6-42
6-6-42 21-1-42 29-6-42 14-3.42
8-4-42 7-4-42 14-3.42
5-1-42 14-3-42
9.4.42 18-6-42
6-6-42 14-1-42 16-3-42 18-2-42
2-3-42
B.R.
B.R. R.C.O.C. R.C.O.C. R.C.A.M.C. C.A. (B) T.C. 31 C.A. (A)
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AIR FORCE CROSS Wickens, Capt. P., R.A.F.
HONORS AND AWARDS WORLD WAR I The following are some of the decorations won by Brockville men. Many of these men served with the Brockville Rifles or the units it perpetuates.
ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE Buell, Lt. Col. W. S., 4th Battalion
(Commander)
DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL Flanigan, Lt. J. E., 9 Bde. Sigs. Section Maloney, Pte. Mike, 38th Battalion Price, Maj. C. B., 14th Battalion Walton, Lt. H. B., Sth Cdn. Mounted Rifles
Maj. T. W. MacDowell, v.C., D.S.O.
VICTORIA CROSS MacDowell, Major Thain W., D.S.O., 38th Battalion
MILITARY MEDAL Angus, Cpl. A., 21st Battalion Barner, Pte. G. R., 2nd Battalion Clarke, Sgt. A. N., 21st Battalion Colville, C.S.M., A. M., 38th Battalion Cullum, Gnr. E. A., C.F.A. Fernie, Bdr. David, 33rd Bty. C.F.A. Flanigan, Lt. J. E., (with bar) 9 Bde. Sigs. Section Fraser, Sgt. W. A., R.A.F. Frego, Pte. John J., 2nd Battalion Grant, Cpl. G. H., 2nd Battalion Hourigan, Pte. Wilfred, 38th Battalion Lawson, Pte. James, 2nd Battalion McGuire, Sgt. James, 13th Battalion Mains, C.S.M. Thomas T., 26th Battalion Nicol, Pte. W. McL., 21st Battalion Saunders, Pte. A. B., P.P.C.L.I. Shotter, Cpl. F. C., 21st Battalion Simpson, Sgt. P. O., Ist Cdn. M. G. Battalion Smith, Cpl. D. W., 51st Battery C.E.A. Smith, Pte. H. E., 21st Battalion Sparling, H Capt. J. Grant MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL Baker, Sgt. Maj. A. D., 4th Cdn. M. G. Battalion Snelson, Sgt. Robert, 11th Cdn. L.T.M. Battery Stephenson, C.S.M. Frank L., 21st Battalion
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER Donaldson, Lt. Col. Anson S. (with bar) No. 3 Cdn. Fd. Ambulance Jones, Lt. Col. Elmer W. (with bar) 21st Battalion MacDowell, Maj. Thain W., V.C., 38th Battalion O’Donahoe, Lt. Col. J. V. P., 87th Battalion O’Donahoe, Maj. D. J., 47th Battalion Price, Maj. C. B., 14th Battalion MILITARY CROSS Chapman, Lt. W. J., 2nd Battalion Fitzsimmons, 2nd Lt. H. H., R.A.F. Gill, Capt. R. J., 21st Battalion Gilmour, Capt. W. N., R.A.M.C. Graham, Capt. W. N., 31st Battalion Kincaid, Lt. H. R., R.A.F. Lewis, Lt. J. A., Royal Irish Regt. MacDowell, Lt. M. W., 4th C.M.R. MacLaren, Capt. J. H., C.F.A. Murphy, Capt. Sterndale, 3rd Battalion Richardson, Maj. R. H., (with bar) 8th Battalion
MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES Baker, Sgt.-Maj. A. D., 4th Cdn. M. G. Battalion Bowie, Lt. Col. R. A., C.A.M.C. Caldwell, Sgt. J. M., 75th Battalion Cockeram, Capt. A., 21st Battalion
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OFFICERS OF THE REGIMENT – JANUARY 1966 TOP ROW LEFT TO RIGHT – Capt, G. M. Hendry, Capt, S. V. Kell, Maj. A. W. H. Chefins, Maj. P. B. Nicholson, Lt. Col, R. C. Tivy, Maj.J. G. Scott, Maj. H. E. S. Grout Capt. H. McBratney, Capt. C.J. Betts. CENTRE ROW LEFT TO RIGHT – Capt. C. 0, McDougall, Capt. W. E. Row, Capt. S. J. Cowan, Lieut, D. J. Gray, Lieut. J.J. J. Power, Capt. R. M, Paul, Capt, J. B. Kirby, Capt. R. J. Frager, Lieut. W. R. J. Vallance, Capt, R. P, Miller, BOTTOM ROV LEFT TO RIGHT – 2/Lt, A, E, Wheeler, 2/Lt. R. A. Kirby, LieutJ. R. Muir, Lieut, D. A. S. Fraser, Lieut, D, J. Kernaghan, Lieut. G. D, Holmes, Lieut. J. C. E. Sheflin, Lieut, P, Harrison, Lieut. A. T. Reid, 2/Lt. W. A. G. Montgomery.

FORMER COMMANDING OFFICERS OF THE REGIMENT
(Including Those Who Served Prior to 1866) FIRST ROW-left to right-Lt. Col, James Breakenridge, J.P., Col, Joel Stone, Lt. Col, L. P. Sherwood, Lt. Col. The Hon, James Morris, Lt. Col, The Hon, George Shers ood, Lt. Col, James Crawford, M.P.P, Lt, Col, W. H, Cole, SECOND ROW- Lt. Col, T. W. Sparham, Lt. Col, A. A. Fisher, Lt. Col, W. S. Buell, C.B, E. V.D., Lt. Col, C. T. Wilkinson, Maj. John Power, V.D, Lt. Col, M. W. MacDowell, M.C., Col. R. J. Gill, M.C, V.D, Lt. Col. F. C. Cury, V.D, Lt. Col, J. R. McCullough, V.D, THIRD ROW-Lt. Col. N. L. MacDowell, E.D., Lt. Col, D. E. Lewis, 0.B.E., E.D., Lt. Col, M, L. Douglas, Lt. Col. G. R. Johnston, E.D, CD, Lt. Col, C. V. W. Vickers, D.S.0, E.D., Lt. Col, C, S, Maclaren, M.C. E.D., Lt. Col, W. S. Watson, S.St.J, Lt. Col, J. D, Cooper, C.D.

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